Search results for 'Primate' (try it on Scholar)

725 found
Sort by:
  1. Georgina M. Montgomery (2005). Place, Practice and Primatology: Clarence Ray Carpenter, Primate Communication and the Development of Field Methodology, 1931-1945. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):495 - 533.score: 24.0
    Place, practice and status have played significant and interacting roles in the complex history of primatology during the early to mid-twentieth century. This paper demonstrates that, within the emerging discipline of primatology, the field was understood as an essential supplement to laboratory work. Founders argued that only in the field could primates be studied in interaction with their natural social group and environment. Such field studies of primate behavior required the development of existing and new field techniques. The practices (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. M. Mur, M. Meys, J. Bodurka, R. Goebel, P. A. Bandettini & N. Kriegeskorte (2012). Human Object-Similarity Judgments Reflect and Transcend the Primate-IT Object Representation. Frontiers in Psychology 4:128-128.score: 24.0
    Primate inferior temporal (IT) cortex is thought to contain a high-level representation of objects at the interface between vision and semantics. This suggests that the perceived similarity of real-world objects might be predicted from the IT representation. Here we show that objects that elicit similar activity patterns in human IT tend to be judged as similar by humans. The IT representation explained the human judgments better than early visual cortex, other ventral stream regions, and a range of computational models. (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller (2005). Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting. Science 309 (5733):385-386.score: 22.0
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello (2010). Primate Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.score: 20.0
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney (2008). Primate Social Knowledge and the Origins of Language. Mind and Society 7 (1):129-142.score: 20.0
    Primate vocal communication is very different from human language. Differences are most pronounced in call production. Differences in production have been overemphasized, however, and distracted attention from the information that primates acquire when they hear vocalizations. In perception and cognition, continuities with language are more apparent. We suggest that natural selection has favored nonhuman primates who, upon hearing vocalizations, form mental representations of other individuals, their relationships, and their motives. This social knowledge constitutes a discrete, combinatorial system that shares (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Louis J. Goldberg & Leonard A. Rosenblum (2013). On the Genetic and Epigenetic Bases of Primate Signal Processing. Biosemiotics 6 (2):161-176.score: 20.0
    Four sequential, sub-processes are identified as the fundamental steps in the processing of signals by big-brained animals. These are, Detection of the signal, its Representation in correlated sensory brain structure, the Interpretation of the signal in another part of the brain and the Expression of the receiver’s response. We label this four-step spatiotemporal process DRIE. We support the view that when the context within which such signals are produced and received is relatively constant, the DRIE process can be ultimately assimilated (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. [deleted]Benoit R. Cottereau (2011). Disparity Context Processing in the Primate Brain: And If the Question Was Both “What” and “When”…. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 20.0
    Disparity Context Processing in the Primate Brain: And If the Question was Both “What” and “When”….
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mary Midgley (1994/1996). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. A. Parker (1998). Primate Cognitive Neuroscience: What Are the Useful Questions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):128-128.score: 18.0
    Study of “theory of mind” in nonhuman primates is hampered both by the lack of rigorous methodology that Heyes stresses and by our lack of knowledge of the cognitive neuroscience of nonhuman primate conceptual structure. Recent advances in this field indicate that progress can be made by first asking simpler research questions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Michael J. Murray & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.) (2009/2010). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gregory Radick (2005). Primate Language and the Playback Experiment, in 1890 and 1980. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):461 - 493.score: 18.0
    The playback experiment -- the playing back of recorded animal sounds to the animals in order to observe their responses -- has twice become central to celebrated researches on non-human primates. First, in the years around 1890, Richard Garner, an amateur scientist and evolutionary enthusiast, used the new wax cylinder phonograph to record and reproduce monkey utterances with the aim of translating them. Second, in the years around 1980, the ethologists Peter Marler, Robert Seyfarth, and Dorothy Cheney used tape (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paul H. Morris, Christine Doe & Emma Godsell (2008). Secondary Emotions in Non-Primate Species? Behavioural Reports and Subjective Claims by Animal Owners. Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):3-20.score: 18.0
    (2008). Secondary emotions in non-primate species? Behavioural reports and subjective claims by animal owners. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 3-20.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Lester Embree (2008). A Beginning for the Phenomenological Theory of Primate Ethology. Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):61-74.score: 18.0
    To establish a starting point for a phenomenological theory of the science of primate ethology, this essay first reviews how the phenomenological philosophers Aron Gurwitsch and Maurice Merleau-Ponty made use of the Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Köhler’s description of chimpanzee consciousness and its objects and then considers primate ethology in light of the theory of the cultural sciences in the work of Gurwitsch in addition to that of Alfred Schutz.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. [deleted]Suzana Herculano-Houzel (2009). The Human Brain in Numbers: A Linearly Scaled-Up Primate Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:31.score: 18.0
    The human brain has often been viewed as outstanding among mammalian brains: the most cognitively able, the largest-than-expected from body size, endowed with an overdeveloped cerebral cortex that represents over 80% of brain mass, and purportedly containing 100 billion neurons and 10x more glial cells. Such uniqueness was seemingly necessary to justify the superior cognitive abilities of humans over larger-brained mammals such as elephants and whales. However, our recent studies using a novel method to determine the cellular composition of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. H. Lyn Miles & Warren P. Roberts (1998). Methodologies, Not Method, for Primate Theory of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):126-127.score: 18.0
    Heyes correctly points out some problems in primate theory of mind, but lacks a critical approach to children's theory of mind, and at times implies meta-awareness when discussing theory of mind. Also, in selecting pure experimental designs, she ignores its limitations, as well as the merits, and at times the necessity, of other methodologies.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Tamara A. R. Weinstein & John P. Capitanio (2005). A Nonhuman Primate Perspective on Affiliation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):366-367.score: 18.0
    Primate research suggests that affiliation is a highly complex construct. Studies of primate affiliation demonstrate the need to distinguish between various affiliative behaviors, consider relationships as emergent properties of these behaviors, define affiliation in the context of general environmental responsiveness, and address developmental changes in affiliation across the lifespan.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Joji Tsunada, Allison E. Baker, Kate L. Christison-Lagay, Selina J. Davis & Yale E. Cohen (2011). Modulation of Cross-Frequency Coupling by Novel and Repeated Stimuli in the Primate Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Adaptive behavior depends on an animal’s ability to ignore uninformative stimuli, such as repeated presentations of the same stimulus, and, instead, detect informative, novel stimuli in its environment. The primate prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to play a central role in this ability. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the ability to differentiate between repeated and novel stimuli are not clear. We hypothesized that the coupling between different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) underlies the PFC’s role in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Sidney R. Lehky, Anne B. Sereno & Margaret E. Sereno (2013). Monkeys in Space: Primate Neural Data Suggest Volumetric Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):555-556.score: 18.0
    The target article does not consider neural data on primate spatial representations, which we suggest provide grounds for believing that navigational space may be three-dimensional rather than quasi–two-dimensional. Furthermore, we question the authors' interpretation of rat neurophysiological data as indicating that the vertical dimension may be encoded in a neural structure separate from the two horizontal dimensions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Yvan I. Russell & Steve Phelps (2013). How Do You Measure Pleasure? A Discussion About Intrinsic Costs and Benefits in Primate Allogrooming. Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):1005-1020.score: 18.0
    Social grooming is an important element of social life in terrestrial primates, inducing the putative benefits of β-endorphin stimulation and group harmony and cohesion. Implicit in many analyses of grooming (e.g. biological markets) are the assumptions of costs and benefits to grooming behaviour. Here, in a review of literature, we investigate the proximate costs and benefits of grooming, as a potentially useful explanatory substrate to the well-documented ultimate (functional) explanations. We find that the hedonic benefits of grooming are well documented. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.) (2009/2010). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jason Clark (2012). Integrating Basic and Higher-Cognitive Emotions Within a Common Evolutionary Framework: Lessons From the Transformation of Primate Dominance Into Human Pride. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):437-460.score: 16.0
    Many argue that higher-cognitive emotions such as pride arose de novo in humans, and thus fall outside of the scope of the kinds of evolutionary explanations offered for ?basic emotions,? like fear. This approach fractures the general category of ?emotion? into two deeply distinct kinds of emotion. However, an increasing number of emotion researchers are converging on the conclusion that higher-cognitive emotions are evolutionarily rooted in simpler emotional responses found in primates. I argue that pride fits this pattern, and then (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Barry Horwitz, Fatima T. Husain & Frank H. Guenther (2005). Auditory Object Processing and Primate Biological Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):134-134.score: 16.0
    This commentary focuses on the importance of auditory object processing for producing and comprehending human language, the relative lack of development of this capability in nonhuman primates, and the consequent need for hominid neurobiological evolution to enhance this capability in making the transition from protosign to protospeech to language.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Frank E. Poirier & Michelle Field (2000). Pavlovian Perceptions and Primate Realities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):262-262.score: 16.0
    The extent to which Pavlovian feed-forward mechanisms operate in primates is debatable. Monkeys and apes are long-lived, usually gregarious, and intelligent animals reliant on learned behavior. Learning occurs during play, mother-infant interactions, and grooming. We address these situations, and are hesitant to accept Domjan et al.'s reliance on Pavlovian conditioning as a major operant in primates.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jacques Vauclair (2002). Does the Use of the Dynamic System Approach Really Help Fill in the Gap Between Human and Nonhuman Primate Language? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):642-643.score: 16.0
    The highly recommended transposition of the dynamic system approach for tackling the question of apes' linguistic abilities has clearly not led to a demonstration that these primates have acquired language. Fundamental differences related to functional modalities – namely, use of the declarative and the form of engagement between mother and infant – can be observed in the way humans and apes use their communicatory systems.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Colin G. Ellard (2001). Evolutionary and Intellectual Antecedents of Primate Visual Processing Streams. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):104-105.score: 16.0
    The main function of vision in many animals is to control movement. In rodents, some visuomotor acts require the construction of models of the external world while others rely on Gibsonian invariants. Such findings support Norman's dual processing approach but it is not clear that the two types of processing rely on homologs of visual processing streams described in primates.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Barry J. Sessle (1998). Recent Evidence of the Involvement of Lateral Frontal Cortex in Primate Cyclic Ingestive Movements. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):529-530.score: 16.0
    This commentary focusses on MacNeilage's arguments and evidence that the development of cerebral cortical controls over cyclic ingestive movements has provided substrates for the evolution of speech production. It outlines evidence from experimental approaches using cortical stimulation, inactivation, and single neuron recording in primates that lateral frontal cortical regions are indeed crucial for the generation and guidance of cyclic orofacial movements.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Dietrich Stout (2001). Constraint and Adaptation in Primate Brain Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):295-296.score: 16.0
    Constraint has played a major role in brain evolution, but cannot tell the whole story. In primates, adaptive specialization is suggested by the existence of a covarying visual system, and may explain some residual variation in the constraint model. Adaptation may also appear at the microstructural level and in the globally integrated system of brain, body, life history and behavior.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Hélène Bouchet, Catherine Blois-Heulin & Alban Lemasson (2013). Social Complexity Parallels Vocal Complexity: A Comparison of Three Non-Human Primate Species. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 16.0
    Social factors play a key role in the structuring of vocal repertoires at the individual level, notably in nonhuman primates. Some authors suggested that, at the species level too, social life may have driven the evolution of communicative complexity, but this has rarely been empirically tested. Here, we use a comparative approach to address this issue. We investigated vocal variability, at both the call type and the repertoire levels, in three forest-dwelling species of Cercopithecinae presenting striking differences in their social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Frans De Waal (2006). Morally Evolved: Primate Social Instincts, Human Morality, and the Rise and Fall of 'Veneer Theory'. In Stephen Macedo & Josiah Ober (eds.), Primates and Philosophers. Princeton University Press.score: 16.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Simon Fitzpatrick (2009). The Primate Mindreading Controversy : A Case Study in Simplicity and Methodology in Animal Psychology. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 224--246.score: 15.0
  31. Candace S. Alcorta (2011). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):233-236.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. E. J. Lowe (2012). The Believing Primate. Faith and Philosophy 29 (2):243-247.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David A. Leopold, Alexander Maier & Nikos K. Logothetis (2003). Measuring Subjective Visual Perception in the Nonhuman Primate. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):115-130.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Andrew Fenton, Re-Conceiving Nonhuman Animal Knowledge Through Contemporary Primate Cognitive Studies.score: 15.0
    Abstract In this paper I examine two claims that support the thesis that chimpanzees are substantive epistemic subjects. First, I defend the claim that chimpanzees are evidence gatherers (broadly construed to include the capacity to gather and use evidence). In the course of showing that this claim is probably true I will also show that, in being evidence gatherers, chimpanzees engage in a recognizable epistemic activity. Second, I defend the claim that chimpanzees achieve a degree of epistemic success while engaging (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Robert W. Mitchell & James R. Anderson (1998). Primate Theory of Mind is a Turing Test. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):127-128.score: 15.0
    Heyes's literature review of deception, imitation, and self-recognition is inadequate, misleading, and erroneous. The anaesthetic artifact hypothesis of self-recognition is unsupported by the data she herself examines. Her proposed experiment is tantalizing, indicating that theory of mind is simply a Turing test.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. B. Thierry (1997). Adaptation and Self-Organization in Primate Societies. Diogenes 45 (180):39-71.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Vittorio Gallese & Maria Alessandra Umiltá (2006). Cognitive Continuity in Primate Social Cognition. Biological Theory 1 (1):25-30.score: 15.0
  38. Frans B. M. Waal (2004). Evolutionary Ethics, Aggression, and Violence: Lessons From Primate Research. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):18-23.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Rebecca L. Walker & Nancy M. P. King (2011). Biodefense Research and the U.S. Regulatory Structure Whither Nonhuman Primate Moral Standing? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (3):277-310.score: 15.0
    Biodefense and emerging infectious disease animal research aims to avoid or ameliorate human disease, suffering, and death arising, or potentially arising, from natural outbreaks or intentional deployment of some of the world’s most dreaded pathogens. Top priority research goals include finding vaccines to prevent, diagnostic tools to detect, and medicines for smallpox, plague, ebola, anthrax, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers, among many other pathogens (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID] priority pathogens). To this end, increased funding for conducting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. N. Everitt (2010). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion, Edited by Jeffrey Schloss and Michael Murray. Mind 119 (475):849-852.score: 15.0
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Marie Fox (2009). The Legal Regulation of Primate Research. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):13-15.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Monica Gerrek (2009). Primate Stroke Research: Still Not Interested. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):29-30.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Benjamin Murphy (2011). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Edited by Jeffrey Schloss and Michael Murray. Heythrop Journal 52 (2):325-326.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Lesley Newson & Stephen Lea (2000). The Limits Imposed by Culture: Are Symmetry Preferences Evidence of a Recent Reproductive Strategy or a Common Primate Inheritance? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):618-619.score: 15.0
    Women's preference for symmetrical men need not have evolved as part of a good gene sexual selection (GGSS) reproductive strategy employed during recent human evolutionary history. It may be a remnant of the reproductive strategy of a perhaps promiscuous species which existed prior to the divergence of the human line from that of the bonobo and chimp.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Frank E. Poirier & Lori J. Fitton (2001). Primate Cultural Worlds: Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):349-350.score: 15.0
    Monkeys and apes, inhabiting variable environments and subjected to K-selection, exhibit cultural behavior transmitted horizontally and vertically, like cetaceans. Behaviors enhancing better health and nutrition, predator avoidance, or mate selection, can affect differential reproduction.Furthermore, dominance hierarchies and social status not only affect the transmission and acceptance of new behaviors but they may also affect genetic inheritance.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Nathan Nobis (2009). Interests and Harms in Primate Research. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):27-29.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Susan Wolf (1997). The Ethical Primate. Philosophical Review 106 (1):131-133.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jonas Langer (2006). The Heterochronic Evolution of Primate Cognitive Development. Biological Theory 1 (1):41-43.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. John Rossi (2009). Nonhuman Primate Research: The Wrong Way to Understand Needs and Necessity. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):21-23.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Michael Sughrue, J. Mocco, Willam Mack, Andrew Ducruet, Ricardo Komotar, Ruth Fischbach, Thomas Martin & E. Sander Connolly (2009). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Bioethical Considerations in Translational Research: Primate Stroke”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):1-3.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 725