Search results for 'Primate' (try it on Scholar)

397 found
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  1.  7
    Georgina M. Montgomery (2005). Place, Practice and Primatology: Clarence Ray Carpenter, Primate Communication and the Development of Field Methodology, 1931-1945. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):495 - 533.
    Place, practice and status have played significant and interacting roles in the complex history of primatology during the early to mid-twentieth century. This paper demonstrates that, within the emerging discipline of primatology, the field was understood as an essential supplement to laboratory work. Founders argued that only in the field could primates be studied in interaction with their natural social group and environment. Such field studies of primate behavior required the development of existing and new field techniques. The practices (...)
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  2.  71
    Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello (2010). Primate Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already (...)
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  3.  15
    Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller (2005). Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting. Science 309 (5733):385-386.
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
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  4. Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.) (2009). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological (...)
     
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  5.  22
    Michael J. Murray & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.) (2009). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological (...)
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  6. Michael Tomasello & Josep Call (1997). Primate Cognition. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In this enlightening exploration of our nearest primate relatives, Michael Tomasello and Josep Call address the current state of our knowledge about the cognitive skills of non-human primates and integrate empirical findings from the beginning of the century to the present.
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  7.  10
    Gregory Radick (2005). Primate Language and the Playback Experiment, in 1890 and 1980. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):461-493.
    The playback experiment -- the playing back of recorded animal sounds to the animals in order to observe their responses -- has twice become central to celebrated researches on non-human primates. First, in the years around 1890, Richard Garner, an amateur scientist and evolutionary enthusiast, used the new wax cylinder phonograph to record and reproduce monkey utterances with the aim of translating them. Second, in the years around 1980, the ethologists Peter Marler, Robert Seyfarth, and Dorothy Cheney used tape recorders (...)
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  8.  8
    Louis J. Goldberg & Leonard A. Rosenblum (2013). On the Genetic and Epigenetic Bases of Primate Signal Processing. Biosemiotics 6 (2):161-176.
    Four sequential, sub-processes are identified as the fundamental steps in the processing of signals by big-brained animals. These are, Detection of the signal, its Representation in correlated sensory brain structure, the Interpretation of the signal in another part of the brain and the Expression of the receiver’s response. We label this four-step spatiotemporal process DRIE. We support the view that when the context within which such signals are produced and received is relatively constant, the DRIE process can be ultimately assimilated (...)
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  9.  24
    Paul H. Morris, Christine Doe & Emma Godsell (2008). Secondary Emotions in Non-Primate Species? Behavioural Reports and Subjective Claims by Animal Owners. Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):3-20.
    (2008). Secondary emotions in non-primate species? Behavioural reports and subjective claims by animal owners. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 3-20.
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  10.  34
    Mary Midgley (1994). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality. Routledge.
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come (...)
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  11.  26
    Manuel Worsdorfer (2015). 'Animal Behavioural Economics': Lessons Learnt From Primate Research. Economic Thought 4 (1):80-106.
    The paper gives an overview of primate research and the economic-ethical 'lessons' we can derive from it. In particular, it examines the complex, multi-faceted and partially conflicting nature of human primates. Our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees and bonobos, apparently walk on two legs: a selfish and a groupish leg. Given evolutionary continuity and gradualism between monkeys, apes and humans, human primates seem to be bipolar apes as well. They, too, tend to display a dual structure: there seems to (...)
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  12.  16
    Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney (2008). Primate Social Knowledge and the Origins of Language. Mind and Society 7 (1):129-142.
    Primate vocal communication is very different from human language. Differences are most pronounced in call production. Differences in production have been overemphasized, however, and distracted attention from the information that primates acquire when they hear vocalizations. In perception and cognition, continuities with language are more apparent. We suggest that natural selection has favored nonhuman primates who, upon hearing vocalizations, form mental representations of other individuals, their relationships, and their motives. This social knowledge constitutes a discrete, combinatorial system that shares (...)
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  13.  4
    Joëlle Proust (2016). The Evolution of Primate Communication and Metacommunication. Mind and Language 31 (2):177-203.
    Against the prior view that primate communication is based only on signal decoding, comparative evidence suggests that primates are able, no less than humans, to intentionally perform or understand impulsive or habitual communicational actions with a structured evaluative nonconceptual content. These signals convey an affordance-sensing that immediately motivates conspecifics to act. Although humans have access to a strategic form of propositional communication adapted to teaching and persuasion, they share with nonhuman primates the capacity to communicate in impulsive or habitual (...)
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  14.  9
    Tamara A. R. Weinstein & John P. Capitanio (2005). A Nonhuman Primate Perspective on Affiliation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):366-367.
    Primate research suggests that affiliation is a highly complex construct. Studies of primate affiliation demonstrate the need to distinguish between various affiliative behaviors, consider relationships as emergent properties of these behaviors, define affiliation in the context of general environmental responsiveness, and address developmental changes in affiliation across the lifespan.
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  15.  20
    A. Parker (1998). Primate Cognitive Neuroscience: What Are the Useful Questions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):128-128.
    Study of “theory of mind” in nonhuman primates is hampered both by the lack of rigorous methodology that Heyes stresses and by our lack of knowledge of the cognitive neuroscience of nonhuman primate conceptual structure. Recent advances in this field indicate that progress can be made by first asking simpler research questions.
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  16.  9
    Lester Embree (2008). A Beginning for the Phenomenological Theory of Primate Ethology. Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):61-74.
    To establish a starting point for a phenomenological theory of the science of primate ethology, this essay first reviews how the phenomenological philosophers Aron Gurwitsch and Maurice Merleau-Ponty made use of the Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Köhler’s description of chimpanzee consciousness and its objects and then considers primate ethology in light of the theory of the cultural sciences in the work of Gurwitsch in addition to that of Alfred Schutz.
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  17.  2
    M. Midgley & A. Freeman (1995). The Ethical Primate. Anthony Freeman in Discussion with Mary Midgley. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):67-75.
    [opening paragraph}: The latest book by moral philosopher Mary Midgley prompted Anthony Freeman to consider some of the cultural and ethical aspects of consciousness and to discuss them with the author. What have ethics to do with consciousness? First, it is consciousness that makes morality possible. Second, neither subject fits comfortably into currently popular reductive schemes. As a consequence both have tended to be isolated in a ghetto, shut off from the rest of the intellectual scene. So believes Mary Midgley, (...)
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  18.  5
    H. Lyn Miles & Warren P. Roberts (1998). Methodologies, Not Method, for Primate Theory of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):126-127.
    Heyes correctly points out some problems in primate theory of mind, but lacks a critical approach to children's theory of mind, and at times implies meta-awareness when discussing theory of mind. Also, in selecting pure experimental designs, she ignores its limitations, as well as the merits, and at times the necessity, of other methodologies.
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  19. Lisa Kemmerer (ed.) (2012). Primate People: Saving Nonhuman Primates Through Education, Advocacy, and Sanctuary. University of Utah Press.
    In the last 30 years the bushmeat trade has led to the slaughter of nearly 90 percent of West Africa’s bonobos, perhaps our closest relatives, and has recently driven Miss Waldron’s red colobus monkey to extinction. Earth was once rich with primates, but every species—except one—is now extinct or endangered because of one primate—_Homo sapiens_. How have our economic and cultural practices pushed our cousins toward destruction? Would we care more about their fate if we knew something of their (...)
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  20. Sidney R. Lehky, Anne B. Sereno & Margaret E. Sereno (2013). Monkeys in Space: Primate Neural Data Suggest Volumetric Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):555-556.
    The target article does not consider neural data on primate spatial representations, which we suggest provide grounds for believing that navigational space may be three-dimensional rather than quasi–two-dimensional. Furthermore, we question the authors' interpretation of rat neurophysiological data as indicating that the vertical dimension may be encoded in a neural structure separate from the two horizontal dimensions.
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  21. Mary Midgley (2002). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality. Routledge.
    In _The Ethical Primate_, Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the _Times Literary Supplement_, addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come about.
     
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  22. Mary Midgley (1994). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality. Routledge.
    In _The Ethical Primate_, Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the _Times Literary Supplement_, addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come about.
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  23. Michael Tomasello & Klaus Zuberbühler (2002). Primate Vocal and Gestural Communication. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press 293--29.
  24.  59
    John Duncan (2010). The Multiple-Demand System of the Primate Brain: Mental Programs for Intelligent Behaviour. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):172-179.
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  25.  13
    Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Matthias Schlesewsky, Steven L. Small & Josef P. Rauschecker (2015). Neurobiological Roots of Language in Primate Audition: Common Computational Properties. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (3):142-150.
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  26.  5
    Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom (1987). Primate Handedness Reconsidered. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):247.
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  27. Richard W. Byrne (2002). Evolutionary Psychology and Primate Cognition. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press 393--398.
     
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  28.  4
    Marc D. Hauser, Elissa L. Newport & Richard N. Aslin (2001). Segmentation of the Speech Stream in a Non-Human Primate: Statistical Learning in Cotton-Top Tamarins. Cognition 78 (3):B53-B64.
  29. Simon Fitzpatrick (2009). The Primate Mindreading Controversy : A Case Study in Simplicity and Methodology in Animal Psychology. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press 224--246.
  30.  2
    Michael Sughrue, J. Mocco, Willam Mack, Andrew Ducruet, Ricardo Komotar, Ruth Fischbach, Thomas Martin & E. Sander Connolly (2009). Bioethical Considerations in Translational Research: Primate Stroke. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):3-12.
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  31. Daya S. Gupta (2014). Processing of Sub- and Supra-Second Intervals in the Primate Brain Results From the Calibration of Neuronal Oscillators Via Sensory, Motor, and Feedback Processes. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  32.  2
    R. W. Byrne & A. Whiten (1988). Toward the Next Generation in Data Quality: A New Survey of Primate Tactical Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):267.
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  33.  4
    R. Allen Gardner & Beatrix T. Gardner (1986). Review: Discovering and Understanding the Meaning of Primate Signals. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (4):477 - 495.
    This volume, edited by a philosopher and an anthropologist, is a collection of essays on the philosophical implications of laboratory and field research. While neither the best nor the worst of the genre, it is a collection that offers a representative sample of traditional themes. As practicing scientists who view the implications of behavioural research from a somewhat different perspective we offer this critical review.
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  34.  1
    Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom (1988). Primate Handedness: A Foot in the Door. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):737.
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  35.  10
    Andrew Whiten (2000). Primate Culture and Social Learning. Cognitive Science 24 (3):477-508.
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  36.  7
    Michael A. Skeide & Angela D. Friederici (2015). Response to Bornkessel-Schlesewsky Et Al. – Towards a Nonhuman Primate Model of Language? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (9):483.
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  37.  19
    J. Mcdermott & M. Hauser (2004). Are Consonant Intervals Music to Their Ears? Spontaneous Acoustic Preferences in a Nonhuman Primate. Cognition 94 (2):B11-B21.
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  38. Simon M. Reader & Katharine MacDonald (2003). Environmental Variability and Primate Behavioural Flexibility. In Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.), Animal Innovation. OUP Oxford
     
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  39. James C. Lynch (1978). The Command Function Concept in Studies of the Primate Nervous System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):31.
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  40.  15
    Robert M. Seyfarth, Dorothy L. Cheney & Thore J. Bergman (2005). Primate Social Cognition and the Origins of Language. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):264-266.
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  41.  10
    Marc D. Hauser (1997). Artifactual Kinds and Functional Design Features: What a Primate Understands Without Language. Cognition 64 (3):285-308.
  42.  3
    W. John Smith, Julia Chase & Anna Katz Lieblich (1974). Tongue Showing: A Facial Display of Humans and Other Primate Species. Semiotica 11 (3).
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  43.  6
    Juan-Carlos Gomez (1996). 19 Non-Human Primate Theories of (Non-Human Primate) Minds: Some Issues Concerning the Origins of Mind-Reading. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press 330.
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  44.  4
    Domenic V. Cicchetti (1987). On Viewing the Evidence for Primate Handedness: Some Biostatistical Considerations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):268.
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  45.  12
    Adriano R. Lameira, Ian Maddieson & Klaus Zuberbühler (2014). Primate Feedstock for the Evolution of Consonants. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (2):60-62.
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  46.  12
    James K. Rilling (2014). Comparative Primate Neuroimaging: Insights Into Human Brain Evolution. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (1):46-55.
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  47. B. Thierry (1997). Adaptation and Self-Organization in Primate Societies. Diogenes 45 (180):39-71.
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  48. David C. Van Essen & Edgar A. Deyoe (1995). Concurrent Processing in the Primate Visual Cortex. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press
  49.  25
    Vittorio Gallese & Maria Alessandra Umiltá (2006). Cognitive Continuity in Primate Social Cognition. Biological Theory 1 (1):25-30.
  50.  16
    A. Ghazanfar (1999). The Neuroethology of Primate Vocal Communication: Substrates for the Evolution of Speech. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (10):377-384.
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