Search results for 'Primates (Nonhuman)' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hope Ferdowsian & Agustín Fuentes (2014). Harms and Deprivation of Benefits for Nonhuman Primates in Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):143-156.score: 192.0
    The risks of harm to nonhuman primates, and the absence of benefits for them, are critically important to decisions about nonhuman primate research. Current guidelines for review and practice tend to be permissive for nonhuman primate research as long as minimal welfare requirements are fulfilled and human medical advances are anticipated. This situation is substantially different from human research, in which risks of harms to the individual subject are typically reduced to the extent feasible. A risk threshold is needed (...)
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  2. David Wendler (2014). Should Protections for Research with Humans Who Cannot Consent Apply to Research with Nonhuman Primates? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):157-173.score: 192.0
    Research studies and interventions sometimes offer potential benefits to subjects that compensate for the risks they face. Other studies and interventions, which I refer to as “nonbeneficial” research, do not offer subjects a compensating potential for benefit. These studies and interventions have the potential to exploit subjects for the benefit of others, a concern that is especially acute when investigators enroll individuals who are unable to give informed consent. US regulations for research with human subjects attempt to address this concern (...)
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  3. Dario Maestripieri (1995). Maternal Encouragement in Nonhuman Primates and the Question of Animal Teaching. Human Nature 6 (4):361-378.score: 192.0
    Most putative cases of teaching in nonhuman animals involve parent-offspring interactions. The interpretation of these cases, particularly with regard to the cognitive processes involved, is controversial. Qualitative and quantitative observations made in nonhuman primates suggest that, in some species, mothers encourage their infants’ independent locomotion and that encouragement can be considered a form of instruction. In macaques, experience in raising previous offspring accounts in part for variability between mothers in propensity to encourage infant motor skills. Parsimony suggests that the (...)
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  4. C. M. Heyes (1998). Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):101-114.score: 156.0
    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationships, deception, role-taking, and perspective-taking (...)
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  5. John P. Gluck (2014). Moving Beyond the Welfare Standard of Psychological Well-Being for Nonhuman Primates: The Case of Chimpanzees. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):105-116.score: 148.0
    Since 1985, the US Animal Welfare Act and Public Health Service policy have required that researchers using nonhuman primates in biomedical and behavioral research develop a plan “for a physical environment adequate to promote the psychological well-being of primates.” In pursuing this charge, housing attributes such as social companionship, opportunities to express species-typical behavior, suitable space for expanded locomotor activity, and nonstressful relationships with laboratory personnel are dimensions that have dominated the discussion. Regulators were careful not to direct (...)
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  6. Robert W. Lurz & Carla Krachun (2011). How Could We Know Whether Nonhuman Primates Understand Others' Internal Goals and Intentions? Solving Povinelli's Problem. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):449-481.score: 144.0
    A persistent methodological problem in primate social cognition research has been how to determine experimentally whether primates represent the internal goals of other agents or just the external goals of their actions. This is an instance of Daniel Povinelli’s more general challenge that no experimental protocol currently used in the field is capable of distinguishing genuine mindreading animals from their complementary behavior-reading counterparts. We argue that current methods used to test for internal-goal attribution in primates do not solve (...)
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  7. Colin Gray & Phil Russell (1998). Theory of Mind in Nonhuman Primates: A Question of Language? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):121-121.score: 144.0
    Two substantive comments are made. The first is methodological, and concerns Heyes's proposals for a critical test for theory of mind. The second is theoretical, and concerns the appropriateness of asking questions about theory of mind in nonhuman primates. Although Heyes warns against the apparent simplicity of the theory of mind hypothesis, she underplays the linguistic implications.
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  8. Kim A. Bard (1998). Imitation and Mirror Self-Recognition May Be Developmental Precursors to Theory of Mind in Human and Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):115-115.score: 144.0
    Heyes argues that nonhuman primates are unable to imitate, recognize themselves in mirrors, and take another's perspective, and that none of these capabilities are evidence for theory of mind. First, her evaluation of the evidence, especially for imitation and mirror self-recognition, is inaccurate. Second, she neglects to address the important developmental evidence that these capabilities are necessary precursors in the development of theory of mind.
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  9. Daniela Corbetta (2003). Right-Handedness May Have Come First: Evidence From Studies in Human Infants and Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):217-218.score: 144.0
    Recent studies with human infants and nonhuman primates reveal that posture interacts with the expression and stability of handedness. Converging results demonstrate that quadrupedal locomotion hinders the expression of handedness, whereas bipedal posture enhances preferred hand use. From an evolutionary perspective, these findings suggest that right-handedness may have emerged first, following the adoption of bipedal locomotion, with speech emerging later.
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  10. Gillian R. Brown (2004). Tolerated Scrounging in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):562-563.score: 144.0
    Gurven suggests that the tolerated scrounging model has limited relevance for explaining patterns of food transfers in human populations. However, this conclusion is based on a restricted interpretation of the tolerated scrounging model proposed originally by Blurton Jones (1987). Examples of food transfers in nonhuman primates illustrate that the assumptions of Gurven's tolerated scrounging model are open to question.
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  11. Allison M. Howard & Dorothy M. Fragaszy (2013). Applying the Bicoded Spatial Model to Nonhuman Primates in an Arboreal Multilayer Environment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):552-553.score: 144.0
    Applying the framework proposed by Jeffery et al. to nonhuman primates moving in multilayer arboreal and terrestrial environments, we see that these animals must generate a mosaic of many bicoded spaces in order to move efficiently and safely through their habitat. Terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology and three-dimensional modelling of canopy movement may permit testing of Jeffery et al.'s framework in natural environments.
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  12. Joëlle Proust (1999). Can Nonhuman Primates Read Minds? Philosophical Topics 27 (1):203-232.score: 120.0
    Granted that a given species is able to entertain beliefs and desires, i.e. to have (epistemic and motivational) internal states with semantically evaluable contents, one can raise the question of whether the species under investigation is, in addition, able to represent properties and events that are not only perceptual or physical, but mental, and use the latter to guide their actions, not only as reliable cues for achieving some output, but as mental cues (that is: whether it can 'read minds'). (...)
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  13. Hermann Ackermann, Steffen R. Hage & Wolfram Ziegler (forthcoming). Brain Mechanisms of Acoustic Communication in Humans and Nonhuman Primates: An Evolutionary Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-84.score: 120.0
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  14. J. Mcdermott & M. Hauser (2007). Nonhuman Primates Prefer Slow Tempos but Dislike Music Overall☆. Cognition 104 (3):654-668.score: 120.0
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  15. Jamie L. Eberling, Krystof S. Bankiewicz, James P. O'Neil & William J. Jagust (2007). PET 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-M-Tyrosine Studies of Dopaminergic Function in Human and Nonhuman Primates. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:9.score: 120.0
    Although positron emission tomography (PET) and the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) tracer 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine (FMT) has been used to assess the integrity of the presynaptic dopamine system in the brain, relatively little has been published in terms of brain FMT uptake values especially for normal human subjects. Twelve normal volunteer subjects were scanned using PET and FMT to determine the range of normal striatal uptake values using Patlak graphical analysis. For comparison, seven adult rhesus monkeys were studied and the data (...)
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  16. Jacques Vauclair (2004). Lateralization of Communicative Signals in Nonhuman Primates and the Hypothesis of the Gestural Origin of Language. Interaction Studies 5 (3):365-386.score: 120.0
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  17. Myrna E. Watanabe (2004). Origins of HIV: The Interrelationship Between Nonhuman Primates and the Virus. Bioscience 54 (9):810.score: 120.0
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  18. R. J. Andrew (1993). Behavioural Constraints on Social Communication Are Not Likely to Prevent the Evolution of Large Social Groups in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):694.score: 120.0
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  19. Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2005). Reasoning and Thinking in Nonhuman Primates. In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge Univ Pr. 607--632.score: 120.0
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  20. Richard J. Davidson, Andrew Fox & Ned H. Kalin (2007). Neural Bases of Emotion Regulation in Nonhuman Primates and Humans. In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press. 47--68.score: 120.0
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  21. Ray Greek, Lawrence A. Hansen & Andre Menache (2011). An Analysis of the Bateson Review of Research Using Nonhuman Primates. Medicolegal and Bioethics 1 (1):3-22.score: 120.0
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  22. Dk Candland & Pg Judge (1988). Visual Categorization by Nonhuman-Primates. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):498-498.score: 120.0
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  23. J. McDdermontt & M. Hauser (2004). Are Consonant Intervals Music to Their Ears? Spontaneous Acoustic Preferences in a Nonhuman Primates. Cognition 94:B11 - B24.score: 120.0
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  24. Lisa Parr & Erin Hecht (2011). Facial Perception in Nonhuman Primates. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
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  25. Mt Phelps, Wa Roberts & Aa Wright (1992). Human and Monkey Memory for Upright and Inverted Faces of Human and Nonhuman-Primates. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):458-458.score: 120.0
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  26. Peter R. Rapp (1994). Functional Components of the Hippocampal Memory System: Implications for Future Learning and Memory Research in Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):491-492.score: 120.0
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  27. L. R. Squire (1987). Neural Substrates of Memory in Humans and Nonhuman-Primates. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):345-345.score: 120.0
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  28. Gijsbert Stoet & Lawrence Snyder (2008). Task-Switching in Human and Nonhuman Primates: Understanding Rule Encoding and Control From Behavior to Single Neurons. In Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.), Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
  29. Roger K. R. Thompson & David L. Oden (2000). Categorical Perception and Conceptual Judgments by Nonhuman Primates: The Paleological Monkey and the Analogical Ape. Cognitive Science 24 (3):363-396.score: 120.0
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  30. Ruth Tincoff, Marc D. Hauser & Marc Hauser (2006). Cognitive Basis for Language Evolution in Nonhuman Primates. In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. 553--538.score: 120.0
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  31. Sarah Mychal Jones & Elizabeth M. Brannon (2012). Prosimian Primates Show Ratio Dependence in Spontaneous Quantity Discriminations. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 102.0
    We directly tested the predictions of the approximate number system (ANS) and the object file system in the spontaneous numerical judgments of prosimian primates. Prior work indicates that when human infants and a few species of nonhuman animals are given a single-trial choice between two sequentially baited buckets they choose the bucket with the greater amount of food but only when the quantities are small. This pattern of results has been interpreted as evidence that a limited capacity object-file system (...)
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  32. Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney (2008). Primate Social Knowledge and the Origins of Language. Mind and Society 7 (1):129-142.score: 82.0
    Primate vocal communication is very different from human language. Differences are most pronounced in call production. Differences in production have been overemphasized, however, and distracted attention from the information that primates acquire when they hear vocalizations. In perception and cognition, continuities with language are more apparent. We suggest that natural selection has favored nonhuman primates who, upon hearing vocalizations, form mental representations of other individuals, their relationships, and their motives. This social knowledge constitutes a discrete, combinatorial system that (...)
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  33. Bennett G. Galef (1992). The Question of Animal Culture. Human Nature 3 (2):157-178.score: 72.0
    In this paper I consider whether traditional behaviors of animals, like traditions of humans, are transmitted by imitation learning. Review of the literature on problem solving by captive primates, and detailed consideration of two widely cited instances of purported learning by imitation and of culture in free-living primates (sweet-potato washing by Japanese macaques and termite fishing by chimpanzees), suggests that nonhuman primates do not learn to solve problems by imitation. It may, therefore, be misleading to treat animal (...)
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  34. Jacques Vauclair (2002). Does the Use of the Dynamic System Approach Really Help Fill in the Gap Between Human and Nonhuman Primate Language? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):642-643.score: 66.0
    The highly recommended transposition of the dynamic system approach for tackling the question of apes' linguistic abilities has clearly not led to a demonstration that these primates have acquired language. Fundamental differences related to functional modalities – namely, use of the declarative and the form of engagement between mother and infant – can be observed in the way humans and apes use their communicatory systems.
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  35. B. Bermond (2001). A Neuropsychological and Evolutionary Approach to Animal Consciousness and Animal Suffering. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:47- 62.score: 60.0
  36. Melvyn A. Goodale (2004). Perceiving the World and Grasping It: Dissociations Between Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press. 1159-1172.score: 60.0
     
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  37. Mark Chen, Tanya L. Chartrand, Annette Y. Lee-Chai & John A. Bargh (1998). Priming Primates: Human and Otherwise. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):685-686.score: 54.0
    The radical nub of Byrne & Russon's argument is that passive priming effects can produce much of the evidence of higher-order cognition in nonhuman primates. In support of their position we review evidence of similar behavioral priming effects n humans. However, that evidence further suggests that even program-level imitative behavior can be produced through priming.
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  38. Robert M. Gordon (1998). The Prior Question: Do Human Primates Have a Theory of Mind? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):120-121.score: 54.0
    Given Heyes's construal of there is still no convincing evidence of theory of mind in human primates, much less nonhuman. Rather than making unfounded assumptions about what underlies human social competence, one should ask what mechanisms other primates have and then inquire whether more sophisticated elaborations of those might not account for much of human competence.
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  39. Annukka K. Lindell (2013). Continuities in Emotion Lateralization in Human and Non-Human Primates. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 54.0
    Where hemispheric lateralization was once considered an exclusively human trait, it is increasingly recognized that hemispheric asymmetries are evident throughout the animal kingdom. Emotion is a prime example of a lateralized function: given its vital role in promoting adaptive behavior and hence survival, a growing body of research in affective neuroscience is working to illuminate the cortical bases of emotion processing. Presuming that human and nonhuman primates evolved from a shared ancestor, one would anticipate evidence of organizational continuity in (...)
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  40. J. Michael Plavcan (2012). Sexual Size Dimorphism, Canine Dimorphism, and Male-Male Competition in Primates. Human Nature 23 (1):45-67.score: 54.0
    Sexual size dimorphism is generally associated with sexual selection via agonistic male competition in nonhuman primates. These primate models play an important role in understanding the origins and evolution of human behavior. Human size dimorphism is often hypothesized to be associated with high rates of male violence and polygyny. This raises the question of whether human dimorphism and patterns of male violence are inherited from a common ancestor with chimpanzees or are uniquely derived. Here I review patterns of, and (...)
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  41. Barbara Smuts (1992). Male Aggression Against Women. Human Nature 3 (1):1-44.score: 54.0
    Male aggression against females in primates, including humans, often functions to control female sexuality to the male’s reproductive advantage. A comparative, evolutionary perspective is used to generate several hypotheses to help to explain cross-cultural variation in the frequency of male aggression against women. Variables considered include protection of women by kin, male-male alliances and male strategies for guarding mates and obtaining adulterous matings, and male resource control. The relationships between male aggression against women and gender ideologies, male domination of (...)
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  42. Stéphane Jacobs, Claudio Brozzoli, Fadila Hadj-Bouziane, Martine Meunier & Alessandro Farnè (2011). Studying Multisensory Processing and Its Role in the Representation of Space Through Pathological and Physiological Crossmodal Extinction. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 48.0
    The study of crossmodal extinction has brought a considerable contribution to our understanding of how the integration of stimuli perceived in multiple sensory modalities is used by the nervous system to build coherent representations of the space that directly surrounds us. Indeed, by revealing interferences between stimuli in a disturbed system, extinction provides an invaluable opportunity to investigate the interactions that normally exist between those stimuli in an intact system. Here, we first review studies on pathological crossmodal extinction, from the (...)
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  43. Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos Kazutaka Takahashi, Maryam Saleh, Richard D. Penn (2011). Propagating Waves in Human Motor Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 48.0
    Previous studies in non-human primates have shown that beta oscillations (15-30Hz) of local field potentials (LFPs) in the arm/hand areas of primary motor cortex (MI) propagate as traveling waves across the cortex. These waves exhibited two stereotypical features across animals and tasks: 1) The waves propagated in two dominant modal directions roughly 180 degrees apart, and 2) their propagation speed ranged from 10 ~ 35 cm/s. It is, however, unknown if such cortical waves occur in the human motor cortex. (...)
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  44. Tamara A. R. Weinstein & John P. Capitanio (2005). A Nonhuman Primate Perspective on Affiliation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):366-367.score: 42.0
    Primate research suggests that affiliation is a highly complex construct. Studies of primate affiliation demonstrate the need to distinguish between various affiliative behaviors, consider relationships as emergent properties of these behaviors, define affiliation in the context of general environmental responsiveness, and address developmental changes in affiliation across the lifespan.
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  45. David A. Leopold, Alexander Maier & Nikos K. Logothetis (2003). Measuring Subjective Visual Perception in the Nonhuman Primate. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):115-130.score: 40.0
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  46. Andrew Fenton, Re-Conceiving Nonhuman Animal Knowledge Through Contemporary Primate Cognitive Studies.score: 40.0
    Abstract In this paper I examine two claims that support the thesis that chimpanzees are substantive epistemic subjects. First, I defend the claim that chimpanzees are evidence gatherers (broadly construed to include the capacity to gather and use evidence). In the course of showing that this claim is probably true I will also show that, in being evidence gatherers, chimpanzees engage in a recognizable epistemic activity. Second, I defend the claim that chimpanzees achieve a degree of epistemic success while engaging (...)
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  47. Rebecca L. Walker & Nancy M. P. King (2011). Biodefense Research and the U.S. Regulatory Structure Whither Nonhuman Primate Moral Standing? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (3):277-310.score: 40.0
    Biodefense and emerging infectious disease animal research aims to avoid or ameliorate human disease, suffering, and death arising, or potentially arising, from natural outbreaks or intentional deployment of some of the world’s most dreaded pathogens. Top priority research goals include finding vaccines to prevent, diagnostic tools to detect, and medicines for smallpox, plague, ebola, anthrax, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers, among many other pathogens (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID] priority pathogens). To this end, increased funding for conducting (...)
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  48. John Rossi (2009). Nonhuman Primate Research: The Wrong Way to Understand Needs and Necessity. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):21-23.score: 40.0
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  49. Rebecca L. Walker Nancy M. P. King (2011). Biodefense Research and the U.S. Regulatory Structure Whither Nonhuman Primate Moral Standing? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (3):277-310.score: 40.0
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  50. Sarah T. Boysen & Karen I. Hallberg (2000). Primate Numerical Competence: Contributions Toward Understanding Nonhuman Cognition. Cognitive Science 24 (3):423-443.score: 40.0
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