Search results for 'Primitive Terms' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Wolfgang Lenzen (1991). Leibniz on Privative and Primitive Terms. Theoria 6 (1):83-96.score: 60.0
    We first present an edition of the manuscript LH VII, B 2, 39 in which Leibniz develops a new formalism in order to give rigorous definitions of positive, of privative, and of primitive terms.This formalism involves a symbolic treatment of conceptual quantification which differs quite considerably from Leibniz’s “standard” theory of “indefinite concepts” as developed, e.g., in the “General Inquirles” In the subsequent commentary we give an interpretation and a critical evaluation of Leibniz’s symbolic apparatus. It turns out (...)
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  2. Czesław Lejewski (1968). A Propositional Calculus in Which Three Mutually Undefinable Functors Are Used as Primitive Terms. Studia Logica 22 (1):17 - 50.score: 45.0
  3. Danie Strauss (2013). Primitive Terms and the Limits of Conceptual Understanding. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):173-185.score: 45.0
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  4. T. Parent (2013). In the Mental Fiction, Mental Fictionalism is Fictitious. The Monist 96 (4):605-621.score: 30.0
    Here I explore the prospects for fictionalism about the mental, modeled after fictionalism about possible worlds. Mental fictionalism holds that the mental states posited by folk psychology do not exist, yet that some sentences of folk psychological discourse are true. This is accomplished by construing truths of folk psychology as “truths according to the mentalistic fiction.” After formulating the view, I identify five ways that the view appears self-refuting. Moreover, I argue that this cannot be fixed by semantic ascent or (...)
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  5. D. F. M. Strauss (2010). The Significance of a Non-Reductionist Ontology for the Discipline of Mathematics: A Historical and Systematic Analysis. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 20 (1):19-52.score: 30.0
    A Christian approach to scholarship, directed by the central biblical motive of creation, fall and redemption and guided by the theoretical idea that God subjected all of creation to His Law-Word, delimiting and determining the cohering diversity we experience within reality, in principle safe-guards those in the grip of this ultimate commitment and theoretical orientation from absolutizing or deifying anything within creation. In this article my over-all approach is focused on the one-sided legacy of mathematics, starting with Pythagorean arithmeticism (“everything (...)
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  6. Klaus‐Hilmar Sprenger (1997). Some Hierarchies of Primitive Recursive Functions on Term Algebras. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 43 (2):251-286.score: 30.0
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  7. John T. Roberts, The Semantic Novelty of Theoretical Terms.score: 24.0
    Often when a new scientific theory is introduced, new terms are introduced along with it. Some of these new terms might be given explicit definitions using only terms that were in currency prior to the introduction of the theory. Some of them might be defined using other new terms introduced with the theory. But it frequently happens that the standard formulations of a theory do not define some of the new terms at all; these (...) are adopted as primitives. The audience is expected to come to grasp the meanings of the primitive terms by learning the role they play in the theory and its applications. I shall call such new and undefined terms, as well as new terms that are defined using them, theoretical terms. 1 If T is a theory, the T-terms are the theoretical terms introduced by T. A theoretical term need not be a word new to human language; it might be an old term that is employed in a new and specialized sense, not equivalent to any of its familiar senses; e.g. “color” in quantum chromodynamics. (shrink)
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  8. K. Hałkowska (1967). A Note on the System of Propositional Calculus with Primitive Rule of Extensionality. Studia Logica 20 (1):150-150.score: 24.0
    The present paper deals with a systemS of propositional calculus, conjunction, equivalence and falsum being its primitive terms.The only primitive rule inS is the rule of extensionality defined by the scheme: $\frac{{E\alpha \beta ,\Phi (\alpha )}}{{\Phi (\beta )}}$.
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  9. Susan Schneider (forthcoming). The Nature of Primitive Symbols in the Language of Thought. Mind and Language.score: 21.0
    This paper provides a theory of the nature of symbols in the language of thought (LOT). My discussion consists in three parts. In part one, I provide three arguments for the individuation of primitive symbols in terms of total computational role. The first of these arguments claims that Classicism requires that primitive symbols be typed in this manner; no other theory of typing will suffice. The second argument contends that without this manner of symbol individuation, there will (...)
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  10. Dale Jacquette (2011). Intentionality as a Conceptually Primitive Relation. Acta Analytica 26 (1):15-35.score: 21.0
    If conceptual analysis is possible for finite thinkers, then there must ultimately be a distinction between complex and primitive or irreducible and unanalyzable concepts, by which complex concepts are analyzed as relations among primitive concepts. This investigation considers the advantages of categorizing intentionality as a primitive rather than analyzable concept, in both a historical Brentanian context and in terms of contemporary philosophy of mind. Arguments in support of intentionality as a primitive relation are evaluated relative (...)
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  11. Adrian Haddock (2012). Meaning, Justification, And'Primitive Normativity'. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):147-174.score: 21.0
    I critically discuss two claims which Hannah Ginsborg makes on behalf of her account of meaning in terms of ‘primitive normativity’(2011; 2012): first, that it avoids the sceptical regress articulated by Kripke's Wittgenstein; second, that it makes sense of the thought—central to Kripke's Wittgenstein—that ‘meaning is normative’, in a way which shows this thought not only to be immune from recent criticisms but also to undermine reductively naturalistic theories of content. In the course of the discussion, I consider (...)
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  12. Timothy J. Nulty (2007). Primitive Disclosive Alethism. Metaphysica 8 (1):1-15.score: 21.0
    The contemporary debate about truth is polarized between deflationists and those who offer robust accounts of truth. I present a theory of truth called ‘Primitive Disclosive Alethism’ that occupies the middle ground between these two extremes. Contrary to deflationist claims, truth has a nature beyond its merely linguistic, expressive function. Truth is objective and non-epistemic, yet cannot be characterized in terms of correspondence. Primitive Disclosive Alethism offers a metaphysically satisfying explanation of our correspondence intuitions, while explaining why (...)
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  13. Czesław Lejewski (1989). Formalization of Functionally Complete Propositional Calculus with the Functor of Implication as the Only Primitive Term. Studia Logica 48 (4):479 - 494.score: 21.0
    The most difficult problem that Leniewski came across in constructing his system of the foundations of mathematics was the problem of defining definitions, as he used to put it. He solved it to his satisfaction only when he had completed the formalization of his protothetic and ontology. By formalization of a deductive system one ought to understand in this context the statement, as precise and unambiguous as possible, of the conditions an expression has to satisfy if it is added to (...)
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  14. MB Kac (1997). The Proper Treatment of Singular Terms in Ordinary English. Mind 106 (424):661-696.score: 21.0
    A free logical analysis of singular terms couched in terms of the semantic theory of Keenan and Faltz (1985) is shown to avoid problems with both Frege's and Russell's treatments. At its heart is the proposal of Keenan and Faltz to reverse the usual mode-theoretic conception of individuals and properties, taking the latter as primitive and the former as derived therefrom. A simple extension of the notion 'property' is then shown (...)
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  15. Ken Warmbrod (1992). Primitive Representation and Misrepresentation. Topoi 11 (1):89-101.score: 21.0
    This paper develops a statistical approach to the problem of primitive representation. Representation of the kind commonly attributed to litmus paper, fuel gauges and tree rings occurs when, so to speak, there is a sufficiently good correlation between two variables. The fundamental distinction between misrepresentation and non-representation is explained in terms of the notion of an informationally useful correlation. The paper further argues that the statistical approach satisfactorily resolves well-known puzzles such as Fodor's disjunction problem.
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  16. Ludwik Borkowski (1957). Systems of the Propositional and of the Functional Calculus Based on One Primitive Term. Studia Logica 6 (1):7 - 55.score: 21.0
  17. Czesław Lejewski (1977). Systems of Leśniewski's Ontology with the Functor of Weak Inclusion as the Only Primitive Term. Studia Logica 36 (4):323-349.score: 21.0
  18. Herbert Hochberg (1978). Nominalism, General Terms, and Predication. The Monist 61 (3):460-475.score: 21.0
    Platonism, in its most recent and seemingly most cogent form, has rested on (a) the supposed indispensability of descriptive predicate terms in so-called "improved," or "clarified," or "perspicuous" languages; (b) the distinction between subject and predicate terms based on the asymmetry of the predication relation; and (c) the claimed ontological significance of the different categories of terms implied by (a) and (b). Nominalism, in one of its most pervasive recent forms, has involved the denial of the criterion (...)
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  19. Ken Warmbrōd (1992). Primitive Representation and Misrepresentation. Topoi 11 (1):89-101.score: 21.0
    This paper develops a statistical approach to the problem of primitive representation. Representation of the kind commonly attributed to litmus paper, fuel gauges and tree rings occurs when, so to speak, there is a sufficiently good correlation between two variables. The fundamental distinction between misrepresentation and non-representation is explained in terms of the notion of an informationally useful correlation. The paper further argues that the statistical approach satisfactorily resolves well known puzzles such as Fodor's disjunction problem.
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  20. Raymond D. Gumb (2002). The Lazy Logic of Partial Terms. Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (3):1065-1077.score: 21.0
    The Logic of Partial Terms LPT is a strict negative free logic that provides an economical framework for developing many traditional mathematical theories having partial functions. In these traditional theories, all functions and predicates are strict. For example, if a unary function (predicate) is applied to an undefined argument, the result is undefined (respectively, false). On the other hand, every practical programming language incorporates at least one nonstrict or lazy construct, such as the if-then-else, but nonstrict functions cannot be (...)
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  21. Peter Smith, Expressing and Capturing the Primitive Recursive Functions.score: 21.0
    The last Episode wasn’t about logic or formal theories at all: it was about common-or-garden arithmetic and the informal notion of computability. We noted that addition can be defined in terms of repeated applications of the successor function. Multiplication can be defined in terms of repeated applications of addition. The exponential and factorial functions can be defined, in different ways, in terms of repeated applications of multiplication. There’s already a pattern emerging here! The main task in the (...)
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  22. Andrew J. Weigert (1975). Substantival Self: A Primitive Term for a Sociological Psychology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (1):43-62.score: 21.0
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  23. Alexander P. Kreuzer (2012). Primitive Recursion and the Chain Antichain Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 53 (2):245-265.score: 21.0
    Let the chain antichain principle (CAC) be the statement that each partial order on $\mathbb{N}$ possesses an infinite chain or an infinite antichain. Chong, Slaman, and Yang recently proved using forcing over nonstandard models of arithmetic that CAC is $\Pi^1_1$-conservative over $\text{RCA}_0+\Pi^0_1\text{-CP}$ and so in particular that CAC does not imply $\Sigma^0_2$-induction. We provide here a different purely syntactical and constructive proof of the statement that CAC (even together with WKL) does not imply $\Sigma^0_2$-induction. In detail we show using a (...)
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  24. Corine Besson (2010). Rigidity, Natural Kind Terms, and Metasemantics. In Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.), The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge. 25--44.score: 18.0
    A paradigmatic case of rigidity for singular terms is that of proper names. And it would seem that a paradigmatic case of rigidity for general terms is that of natural kind terms. However, many philosophers think that rigidity cannot be extended from singular terms to general terms. The reason for this is that rigidity appears to become trivial when such terms are considered: natural kind terms come out as rigid, but so do all (...)
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  25. Corine Besson (2012). Empty Natural Kind Terms and Dry-Earth. Erkenntnis 76 (3):403-425.score: 18.0
    This paper considers the problem of assigning meanings to empty natural kind terms. It does so in the context of the Twin-Earth externalist-internalist debate about whether the meanings of natural kind terms are individuated by the external physical environment of the speakers using these terms. The paper clarifies and outlines the different ways in which meanings could be assigned to empty natural kind terms. And it argues that externalists do not have the semantic resources to assign (...)
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  26. Michael Strevens (2012). Theoretical Terms Without Analytic Truths. Philosophical Studies 160 (1):167-190.score: 18.0
    When new theoretical terms are introduced into scientific discourse, prevailing accounts imply, analytic or semantic truths come along with them, by way of either definitions or reference-fixing descriptions. But there appear to be few or no analytic truths in scientific theory, which suggests that the prevailing accounts are mistaken. This paper looks to research on the psychology of natural kind concepts to suggest a new account of the introduction of theoretical terms that avoids both definition and reference-fixing description. (...)
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  27. Brent G. Kyle (2013). How Are Thick Terms Evaluative? Philosophers' Imprint 13 (1):1-20.score: 18.0
    Ethicists are typically willing to grant that thick terms (e.g. ‘courageous’ and ‘murder’) are somehow associated with evaluations. But they tend to disagree about what exactly this relationship is. Does a thick term’s evaluation come by way of its semantic content? Or is the evaluation pragmatically associated with the thick term (e.g. via conversational implicature)? In this paper, I argue that thick terms are semantically associated with evaluations. In particular, I argue that many thick concepts (if not all) (...)
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  28. Tyler Hildebrand (2013). Can Primitive Laws Explain? Philosophers' Imprint 13 (15):1-15.score: 18.0
    One reason to posit governing laws is to explain the uniformity of nature. Explanatory power can be purchased by accepting new primitives, and scientists invoke laws in their explanations without providing any supporting metaphysics. For these reasons, one might suspect that we can treat laws as wholly unanalyzable primitives. (John Carroll’s *Laws of Nature* (1994) and Tim Maudlin’s *The Metaphysics Within Physics* (2007) offer recent defenses of primitivism about laws.) Whatever defects primitive laws might have, explanatory weakness should not (...)
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  29. Zhihua Yao (2009). Empty Subject Terms in Buddhist Logic: Dignāga and His Chinese Commentators. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4):383-398.score: 18.0
    The problem of empty terms is one of the focal issues in analytic philosophy. Russell’s theory of descriptions, a proposal attempting to solve this problem, attracted much attention and is considered a hallmark of the analytic tradition. Scholars of Indian and Buddhist philosophy, e.g., McDermott, Matilal, Shaw and Perszyk, have studied discussions of empty terms in Indian and Buddhist philosophy. But most of these studies rely heavily on the Nyāya or Navya-Nyāya sources, in which Buddhists are portrayed as (...)
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  30. Antonio Vassallo & Michael Esfeld (2014). A Proposal for a Bohmian Ontology of Quantum Gravity. Foundations of Physics (1):1-18.score: 18.0
    The paper shows how the Bohmian approach to quantum physics can be applied to develop a clear and coherent ontology of non-perturbative quantum gravity. We suggest retaining discrete objects as the primitive ontology also when it comes to a quantum theory of space-time and therefore focus on loop quantum gravity. We conceive atoms of space, represented in terms of nodes linked by edges in a graph, as the primitive ontology of the theory and show how a non-local (...)
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  31. Richard Gray (2006). Natural Phenomenon Terms. Analysis 66 (290):141–148.score: 18.0
    In lecture III of Naming and Necessity, Kripke extends his claim that names are non-descriptive to natural kind terms, and in so doing includes a brief supporting discussion of terms for natural phenomena, in particular the terms ‘light’ and ‘heat’. Whilst natural kind terms continue to feature centrally in the recent literature, natural phenomenon terms have barely figured. The purpose of the present paper is to show how the apparent similarities between natural kind terms (...)
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  32. Rafael de Clercq (2005). Aesthetic Terms, Metaphor, and the Nature of Aesthetic Properties. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):27–32.score: 18.0
    The paper argues that an important class of aesthetic terms cannot be used as metaphors because it is impossible to commit a category mistake with them. It then uses this fact to provide a general definition of 'aesthetic property'.
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  33. Andy Lamey (2012). Primitive Self-Consciousness and Avian Cognition. The Monist 95 (3):486-510.score: 18.0
    Recent work in moral theory has seen the refinement of theories of moral standing, which increasingly recognize a position of intermediate standing between fully self-conscious entities and those which are merely conscious. Among the most sophisticated concepts now used to denote such intermediate standing is that of primitive self-consciousness, which has been used to more precisely elucidate the moral standing of human newborns. New research into the structure of the avian brain offers a revised view of the cognitive abilities (...)
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  34. C. Taylor (1999). Sympathy. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):73-87.score: 18.0
    In this article I examine an example of sympathy -- the actions of one woman who rescued Jews during their persecution in Nazi Europe. I argue that this woman''s account of her actions here suggests that sympathy is a primitive response to the suffering of another. By primitive here I mean: first, that these responses are immediate and unthinking; and second, that these responses are explanatorily basic, that they cannot be explained in terms of some more fundamental (...)
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  35. Igor Douven & Jaap van Brakel (1998). Can the World Help Us in Fixing the Reference of Natural Kind Terms? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 29 (1):59-70.score: 18.0
    According to Putnam the reference of natural kind terms is fixed by the world, at least partly; whether two things belong to the same kind depends on whether they obey the same objective laws. We show that Putnam's criterion of substance identity only “works” if we read “objective laws” as “OBJECTIVE LAWS”. Moreover, at least some of the laws of some of the special sciences have to be included. But what we consider to be good special sciences and what (...)
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  36. Tao Liang (2009). Mencius and the Tradition of Articulating Human Nature in Terms of Growth. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):180-197.score: 18.0
    This article analyses the tradition of “articulating xing in terms of sheng ” and related other expressions, and also examines the debate between Mencius and Gaozi concerning “ xing is known by sheng .” It claims that while Mencius’ “human nature is good” discourse is influenced by the interpretive tradition of “articulating xing in terms of sheng ”, Mencius also transcends and develops this tradition. Therefore it is only when Mencius’ views about the goodness of human nature are (...)
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  37. Michael P. Wolf, Rigid Designation and Natural Kind Terms, Pittsburgh Style. Normative Functionalism and the Pittsburgh School.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses recent literature on rigid designation and natural kind terms that draws on the inferentialist approaches of Sellars and Brandom, among others. Much of the orthodox literature on rigidity may be seen as appealing, more or less explicitly, to a semantic form of “the given” in Sellars’s terms. However, the important insights of that literature may be reconstructed and articulated in terms more congenial to the Pittsburgh school of normative functionalism.
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  38. Gil Sagi (forthcoming). Formality in Logic: From Logical Terms to Semantic Constraints. Logique Et Analyse.score: 18.0
    In the paper I discuss a prevailing view by which logical terms determine forms of sentences and arguments and therefore the logical validity of arguments. This view is common to those who hold that there is a principled distinction between logical and nonlogical terms and those holding relativistic accounts. I adopt the Tarskian tradition by which logical validity is determined by form, but reject the centrality of logical terms. I propose an alternative framework for logic where logical (...)
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  39. Luisa Valente (2007). Names That Can Be Said of Everything: Porphyrian Tradition and 'Transcendental' Terms in Twelfth-Century Logic. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):298-310.score: 18.0
    In an article published in 2003, Klaus Jacobi—using texts partially edited in De Rijk's Logica Modernorum—demonstrated that twelfth-century logic contains a tradition of reflecting about some of the transcendental names (nomina transcendentia). In addition to reinforcing Jacobi's thesis with other texts, this contribution aims to demonstrate two points: 1) That twelfth-century logical reflection about transcendental terms has its origin in the logica vetus, and especially in a passage from Porphyry Isagoge and in Boethius's commentary on it. In spite of (...)
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  40. Åsa Wikforss (2013). Bachelors, Energy, Cats and Water: Putnam on Kinds and Kind Terms. Theoria 79 (3):242-261.score: 18.0
    Since Hilary Putnam and Saul Kripke's first attacks on traditional, descriptivist theories of natural kind terms, it has become customary to speak of the ‘Putnam-Kripke’ view of meaning and reference. This article argues that this is a mistake, and that Putnam's account of natural kind terms is importantly different from that of Kripke. In particular, Putnam has from the very start been sceptical of Kripke's modal claims, and in later papers he explicitly rejects the proposal that theoretical identity (...)
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  41. Liang Tao & Andrew Lambert (2009). Mencius and the Tradition of Articulating Human Nature in Terms of Growth. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):180 - 197.score: 18.0
    This article analyses the tradition of "articulating xing in terms of sheng" and related other expressions, and also examines the debate between Mencius and Gaozi concerning "xing is known by sheng" It claims that while Mencius' "human nature is good" discourse is influenced by the interpretive tradition of "articulating xing in terms of sheng", Mencius also transcends and develops this tradition. Therefore it is only when Mencius' views about the goodness of human nature are understood in the context (...)
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  42. Michael Rubin (2013). Are Chemical Kind Terms Rigid Appliers? Erkenntnis 78 (6):1303-1316.score: 18.0
    According to Michael Devitt, the primary work of a rigidity distinction for kind terms is to distinguish non-descriptional predicates from descriptional predicates. The standard conception of rigidity fails to do this work when it is extended to kind terms. Against the standard conception, Devitt defends rigid application: a predicate is a rigid applier iff, if it applies to an object in one world, it applies to that object in every world in which it exists. Devitt maintains that rigid (...)
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  43. Daniel E. Severin (2008). Unary Primitive Recursive Functions. Journal of Symbolic Logic 73 (4):1122-1138.score: 18.0
    In this article, we study some new characterizations of primitive recursive functions based on restricted forms of primitive recursion, improving the pioneering work of R. M. Robinson and M. D. Gladstone. We reduce certain recursion schemes (mixed/pure iteration without parameters) and we characterize one-argument primitive recursive functions as the closure under substitution and iteration of certain optimal sets.
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  44. Genoveva Martí & José Martínez-Fernández (2011). General Terms, Rigidity and the Trivialization Problem. Synthese 181 (2):277 - 293.score: 18.0
    We defend the view that defines the rigidity of general terms as sameness of designated universal across possible worlds from the objection that such a characterization is incapable of distinguishing rigid from non-rigid readings of general terms and, thus, that it trivializes the notion of rigidity. We also argue that previous attempts to offer a solution to the trivialization problem do no succeed.
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  45. Manuel Bodirsky, Hubie Chen & Michael Pinsker (2010). The Reducts of Equality Up to Primitive Positive Interdefinability. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (4):1249-1292.score: 18.0
    We initiate the study of reducts of relational structures up to primitive positive interdefinability: After providing the tools for such a study, we apply these tools in order to obtain a classification of the reducts of the logic of equality. It turns out that there exists a continum of such reducts. Equivalently, expressed in the language of universal algebra, we classify those locally closed clones over a countable domain which contain all permutations of the domain.
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  46. Helmut Renders (2011). O guia medicinal Primitive Physick de John Wesley de 1747: ciência, charlatania ou medicina social? (John Wesley's medical guide Primitive Physic[k] from 1747: science, charlatanism or social medicine?) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n21p339. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (21):339-353.score: 18.0
    Resumo Em 1747, John Wesley, spiritus rector do movimento metodista, publicou a primeira edição do seu guia medicinal Primitive Physic[k] . Qual era o seu propósito num mundo onde a academia real, herbalistas, curandeiros/as, exorcistas e charlatães competiam pela atenção da população? O artigo apresenta os diferentes grupos que atuaram, ou pretendiam atuar, em prol da saúde na Inglaterra do século 18, e compara o conteúdo do guia Primitive Physic[k] com suas propostas e estratégias terapêuticas. Conclua-se que uma (...)
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  47. William R. Stirton (2012). How to Assign Ordinal Numbers to Combinatory Terms with Polymorphic Types. Archive for Mathematical Logic 51 (5-6):475-501.score: 18.0
    The article investigates a system of polymorphically typed combinatory logic which is equivalent to Gödel’s T. A notion of (strong) reduction is defined over terms of this system and it is proved that the class of well-formed terms is closed under both bracket abstraction and reduction. The main new result is that the number of contractions needed to reduce a term to normal form is computed by an ε 0-recursive function. The ordinal assignments used to obtain this result (...)
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  48. Pius ten Hacken (2010). Creating Legal Terms: A Linguistic Perspective. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (4):407-425.score: 18.0
    Legal terms have a special status at the interface between language and law. Adopting the general framework developed by Jackendoff and the concepts competence and performance as developed by Chomsky, it is shown that legal terms cannot be fully accounted for unless we set up a category of abstract objects. This idea corresponds largely to the classical view of terminology, which has been confronted with some challenges recently. It is shown that for legal terms, arguments against abstract (...)
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  49. David Albrecht, Frank A. Bäuerle, John N. Crossley & John S. Jeavons (1998). Curry-Howard Terms for Linear Logic. Studia Logica 61 (2):223 - 235.score: 18.0
    In this paper we 1. provide a natural deduction system for full first-order linear logic, 2. introduce Curry-Howard-style terms for this version of linear logic, 3. extend the notion of substitution of Curry-Howard terms for term variables, 4. define the reduction rules for the Curry-Howard terms and 5. outline a proof of the strong normalization for the full system of linear logic using a development of Girard's candidates for reducibility, thereby providing an alternative to (...)
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