Search results for 'Primrose Freestone' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vic Norris, Mark S. Madsen & Primrose Freestone (1996). Elements of a Unifying Theory of Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 44 (3-4).score: 240.0
    To discover a unifying theory of biology, it is necessary first to believe in its existence and second to seek its elements. Such a theory would explain the regulation of the cell cycle, differentiation and the origin of life. Some elements of the theory may be obtained by considering both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell cycles. These elements include cytoskeletal proteins, calcium, cyclins, protein kinase C, phosphorylation, transcriptional sensing, autocatalytic gene expression and the physical properties of lipids. Other more exotic candidate (...)
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  2. James Canvin, Susan Grant, Primrose Freestone, Istvan Toth, Mirella Trinei, Kishor Modha, Dominique Cellier & Vic Norris (1998). Rapid Growth Mutants of Escherichia Coli. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (2).score: 240.0
    If rapid growth (rap) mutants of Escherichia coli could be obtained, these might prove a valuable contribution to fields as diverse as growth rate control, biotechnology and the regulation of the bacterial cell cycle. To obtain rap mutants, a dnaQ mutator strain was grown for four and a half days continuously in batch culture. At the end of the selection period, there was no significant change in growth rate. This result means that selecting rap mutants may require an alternative strategy (...)
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  3. Oliver M. Freestone & Peter J. McGoldrick (2008). Motivations of the Ethical Consumer. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):445 - 467.score: 30.0
    There are strong indications that many consumers are switching towards more socially and environmentally responsible products and services, reflecting a shift in consumer values indicated in several countries. However, little is known about the motives that drive some toward, or deter others from, higher levels of ethical concern and action in their purchasing decisions. Following a qualitative investigation using ZMET and focus group discussions, a questionnaire was developed and administered to a representative sample of consumers; nearly 1,000 usable questionnaires were (...)
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  4. O. Freestone & V. Mitchell (2004). Generation Y Attitudes Towards E-Ethics and Internet-Related Misbehaviours. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):121 - 128.score: 30.0
    Aberrant consumer behaviour costs firms millions of pounds a year, and the Internet has provided young techno-literate consumers with a new medium to exploit businesses. This paper addresses Internet related ethics and describes the ways in which young consumers misdemean on the Internet and their attitudes towards these. Using a sample of 219 generation Y consumers, the study identified 24 aberrant behaviours which grouped into five factors; illegal, questionable activities, hacking related, human Internet trade and downloading. Those perceived as least (...)
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  5. Stephen Bolsin, Andrew Patrick, Mark Colson, Bernie Creatie & Liadane Freestone (2005). New Technology to Enable Personal Monitoring and Incident Reporting Can Transform Professional Culture: The Potential to Favourably Impact the Future of Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (5):499-506.score: 30.0
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  6. D. Gwyn Seymour, Anne E. Ball, Elizabeth M. Russell, William R. Primrose, Andrew M. Garratt & John R. Crawford (2001). Problems in Using Health Survey Questionnaires in Older Patients with Physical Disabilities. The Reliability and Validity of the SF‐36 and the Effect of Cognitive Impairment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (4):411-418.score: 30.0
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  7. Emily Grosholz (2001). The Freestone Wall and the Walled Garden. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):2–3.score: 15.0
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  8. David Magnus (2000). Down the Primrose Path. In Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Biology and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press. 91.score: 15.0
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  9. A. MacC Armstrong (1983). The Primrose Path to Philistinism. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (2):138-147.score: 15.0
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  10. B. A. Farrell (1984). Treading the Primrose Path of Dalliance in Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):624.score: 15.0
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  11. As Parkes (1951). The Primrose Path. The Eugenics Review 42:8.score: 15.0
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  12. N. B. Phillips (1984). Jurisfiction: The Primrose Path to Juristic Wisdom. By J. Stanley McQuade. Norcross, Georgia: The Harrison Company, 1982. [REVIEW] American Journal of Jurisprudence 29 (1):220-223.score: 15.0
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  13. Stephen M. Gardiner (2006). A Core Precautionary Principle. Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (1):33–60.score: 3.0
    “[T]he Precautionary Principle still has neither a commonly accepted definition nor a set of criteria to guide its implementation. “There is”, Freestone … cogently observes, “a certain paradox in the widespread and rapid adoption of the Precautionary Principle”: While it is applauded as a “good thing”, no one is quite sure about what it really means or how it might be..
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  14. Massimo Pigliucci (2002). Buffer Zone. Nature 417 (598):599.score: 3.0
    Living organisms are caught between a hammer and an anvil, evolutionarily speaking. On the one hand, they need to buffer the influences of genetic mutations and environmental stresses if they are to develop normally and maintain a coherent and functional form. On the other, stabiliz- ing one’s development too much may mean not being able to respond at all to changes in the environment and starting down the primrose path to extinction. On page 618 of this issue, Queitsch et (...)
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  15. Stevan Harnad, There is No Concrete.score: 3.0
    We are accustomed to thinking that a primrose is "concrete" and a prime number is "abstract," that "roundness" is more abstract than "round," and that "property" is more abstract than "roundness." In reality, the relation between "abstract" and "concrete" is more like the (non)relation between "abstract" and "concave," "concrete" being a sensory term [about what something feels like] and "abstract" being a functional term (about what the sensorimotor system is doing with its input in order to produce its output): (...)
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  16. Peter Danielson (2002). Learning to Cooperate: Reciprocity and Self-Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):256-257.score: 3.0
    Using a simple learning agent, we show that learning self-control in the primrose path experiment does parallel learning cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma. But Rachlin's claim that “there is no essential difference between self-control and altruism” is too strong. Only iterated prisoner's dilemmas played against reciprocators are reduced to self-control problems. There is more to cooperation than self-control and even altruism in a strong sense.
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  17. Jeremy R. Gray & Todd S. Braver (2002). Cognitive Control in Altruism and Self-Control: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):260-260.score: 3.0
    The primrose path and prisoner's dilemma paradigms may require cognitive (executive) control: The active maintenance of context representations in lateral prefrontal cortex to provide top-down support for specific behaviors in the face of short delays or stronger response tendencies. This perspective suggests further tests of whether altruism is a type of self-control, including brain imaging, induced affect, and dual-task studies.
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  18. Edward Wilson Grandin Rajiv Sarkar, Jayaprakash Muliyil Beryl Primrose Gladstone & Gagandeep Kang (2009). Comprehension and Recall of Informed Consent Among Participating Families in a Birth Cohort Study on Diarrhoeal Disease. Public Health Ethics 2 (1).score: 3.0
    Christian Medical College, Vellore, India Jayaprakash Muliyil Christian Medical College, Vellore, India Gagandeep Kang * Christian Medical College, Vellore, India * Corresponding author: Department of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 004, Tamil Nadu, India. Tel.: +91 416 228 2052; Fax: +91 416 223 2035; Email: gkang{at}cmcvellore.ac.in ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Comprehension and recall of informed consent was assessed after the study closure in the parents/guardians of a birth cohort of children participating (...)
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  19. Rajiv Sarkar, Edward Wilson Grandin, Beryl Primrose Gladstone, Jayaprakash Muliyil & Gagandeep Kang (2009). Comprehension and Recall of Informed Consent Among Participating Families in a Birth Cohort Study on Diarrhoeal Disease. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):37-44.score: 3.0
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  20. Rainer Gottlob (1995). Emeralds Are No Chameleons — Why “Grue” is Not Projectible for Induction. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 26 (2):259 - 268.score: 1.0
    The model function for induction of Goodmans's composite predicate "Grue" was examined by analysis. Two subpredicates were found, each containing two further predicates which are mutually exclusive (green and blue, observed before and after t). The rules for the inductive processing of composite predicates were studied with the more familiar predicate "blellow" (blue and yellow) for violets and primroses. The following rules for induction were violated by processing "grue": From two subpredicates only one (blue after t) appears in the conclusion. (...)
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