Search results for 'Privilege' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alison Bailey (1998). Privilege: Expanding on Marilyn Frye's Oppression. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):104-119.score: 24.0
    This essay serves as both a response and embellishment of Marilyn Frye's now classic essay "Oppression." It is meant to pick up where this essay left off and to make connections between oppression, as Frye defines it, and the privileges that result from institutional structures. This essay tries to clarify one meaning of privilege that is lost in philosophical discussions of injustice. I develop a distinction between unearned privileges and earned advantages. Clarifying the meaning of privilege as unearned (...)
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  2. Michael J. Monahan (2014). The Concept of Privilege. South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):73-83.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I examine the use of the concept of privilege within the critical theoretical discourse on oppression and liberation (with a particular focus on white privilege and antiracism in the USA). In order to fulfill the rhetorical aims of liberation, concepts for privilege must meet what I term the ‘boundary condition’, which demarcates the boundary between a privileged elite and the rest of society, and the ‘ignorance condition’, which establishes that the elite status and the (...)
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  3. Kate Hodkinson (2013). The Need to Know—Therapeutic Privilege: A Way Forward. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (2):105-129.score: 24.0
    Providing patients with information is fundamental to respecting autonomy. However, there may be circumstances when information may be withheld to prevent serious harm to the patient, a concept referred to as therapeutic privilege. This paper provides an analysis of the ethical, legal and professional considerations which impact on a decision to withhold information that, in normal circumstances, would be given to the patient. It considers the status of the therapeutic privilege in English case law and concludes that, while (...)
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  4. Maureen Linker (2014). Epistemic Privilege and Expertise in the Context of Meta-Debate. Argumentation 28 (1):67-84.score: 24.0
    I argue that Kotzee’s (Argumentation 24:265–281, 2010) model of meta-debate succeeds in identifying illegitimate or fallacious charges of bias but has the unintended consequence of classifying some legitimate and non-fallacious charges as fallacious. This makes the model, in some important cases, counter-productive. In particular, cases where the call for a meta-debate is prompted by the participant with epistemic privilege and a charge of bias is denied by the participant with social advantage, the impasse will put the epistemically advantaged at (...)
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  5. Ben Kotzee (2010). Poisoning the Well and Epistemic Privilege. Argumentation 24 (3):265-281.score: 22.0
    In this paper, a challenge is outlined for Walton’s recent analysis of the fallacy of poisoning the well. An example of the fallacy in action during a debate on affirmative action on a South African campus is taken to raise the question of how Walton’s analysis squares with the idea that disadvantaged parties in debates about race may be epistemically privileged . It is asked when the background of a participant is relevant to a debate and it is proposed that (...)
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  6. Quassim Cassam (2004). Introspection, Perception, and Epistemic Privilege. The Monist 87 (2):255-274.score: 21.0
  7. Jamie P. Ross (2008). “White Privilege and the Color of Fear.” Chapter in Lessons From The Color of Fear. In Victor Lee Lewis & Hugh Vasquez (eds.), Lessons from The Color of Fear Field Reports. Using the Color of Fear in the Classroom. Speak Out - The Institute for Democratic Education and Cultural.score: 21.0
  8. Dorit Bar-On & Douglas C. Long (2001). Avowals and First-Person Privilege. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (2):311-35.score: 21.0
  9. White Privilege (2008). Peggy McIntosh. In Alexandra Miletta & Maureen McCann Miletta (eds.), Classroom Conversations: A Collection of Classics for Parents and Teachers. The New Press. 169.score: 20.0
  10. K. Brad Wray (2012). Epistemic Privilege and the Success of Science. Noûs 46 (3):375-385.score: 18.0
    Realists and anti-realists disagree about whether contemporary scientists are epistemically privileged. Because the issue of epistemic privilege figures in arguments in support of and against theoretical knowledge in science, it is worth examining whether or not there is any basis for assuming such privilege. I show that arguments that try to explain the success of science by appeal to some sort of epistemic privilege have, so far, failed. They have failed to give us reason to believe (i) (...)
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  11. Alison Bailey (1998). Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a View of Privilege-Cognizant White Character. Hypatia 13 (3):27 - 42.score: 18.0
    I address the problem of how to locate "traitorous" subjects, or those who belong to dominant groups yet resist the usual assumptions and practices of those groups. I argue that Sandra Harding's description of traitors as insiders, who "become marginal" is misleading. Crafting a distinction between "privilege-cognizant" and "privilege-evasive" white scripts, I offer an alternative account of race traitors as privilege-cognizant whites who refuse to animate expected whitely scripts, and who are unfaithful to worldviews whites are expected (...)
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  12. Sonia Kruks (2005). Simone de Beauvoir and the Politics of Privilege. Hypatia 20 (1):178-205.score: 18.0
    : How should socially privileged white feminists (and others) address their privilege? Often, individuals are urged to overcome their own personal racism through a politics of self-transformation. The paper argues that this strategy may be problematic, since it rests on an over-autonomous conception of the self. The paper turns to Simone de Beauvoir for an alternative account of the self, as "situated," and explores what this means for a politics of privilege.
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  13. Cynthia Kaufman (2001). A User's Guide to White Privilege. Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):30-38.score: 18.0
    Picking up where Peggy McKintosh’s “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack” left off, this essay looks further into the ways that racial privilege manifests itself in the lives of white Americans. It explores some of the reasons that white privilege is hard for whites to see and it explores the question of how white people can act responsibly given the unavoidable realities of racial privilege.
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  14. Miranda Fricker (1999). Epistemic Oppression and Epistemic Privilege. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):191-210.score: 18.0
    (1999). Epistemic Oppression and Epistemic Privilege. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 191-210.
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  15. Erika Faith Feigenbaum (2007). Heterosexual Privilege: The Political and the Personal. Hypatia 22 (1):1-9.score: 18.0
    : In this essay, Feigenbaum examines heterosexism as it functions politically and interpersonally in her own experience. She loosely traces her analysis along the current political climate of the bans on same-sex marriages, using this discussion to introduce and illustrate how heterosexual dominance functions. The author aims throughout to clarify what heterosexism looks like "in action," and she moves toward providing steps to recognize, name, interrupt, and counter heterosexist privilege.
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  16. Patrick Emerton & Toby Handfield (forthcoming). Understanding the Political Defensive Privilege. In Cecile Fabre & Seth Lazar (eds.), The Morality of Defensive War. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Nations are understood to have a right to go to war, not only in defense of individual rights, but in defense of their own political standing in a given territory. This paper argues that the political defensive privilege cannot be satisfactorily explained, either on liberal cosmopolitan grounds or on pluralistic grounds. In particular, it is argued that pluralistic accounts require giving implausibly strong weight to the value of political communities, overwhelming the standing of individuals. Liberal cosmopolitans, it is argued, (...)
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  17. Lynne Tirrell (1993). Definition and Power: Toward Authority Without Privilege. Hypatia 8 (4):1-34.score: 18.0
    Feminists have urged women to take semantic authority. This article explains what such authority is, how it depends upon community recognition, and how it differs from privilege and from authority as usually conceived under patriarchy. Understanding its natures and limits is an important part of attaining it. Understanding the role of community explains why separatism is the logical conclusion of this project, and why separatism is valuable even to those who do not separate.
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  18. C. Richard, Y. Lajeunesse & M. -T. Lussier (2010). Therapeutic Privilege: Between the Ethics of Lying and the Practice of Truth. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):353-357.score: 18.0
    The ‘right to the truth’ involves disclosing all the pertinent facts to a patient so that an informed decision can be made. However, this concept of a ‘right to the truth’ entails certain ambiguities, especially since it is difficult to apply the concept in medical practice based mainly on current evidence-based data that are probabilistic in nature. Furthermore, in some situations, the doctor is confronted with a moral dilemma, caught between the necessity to inform the patient (principle of autonomy) and (...)
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  19. Evan Fox-Decent, Parliamentary Privilege and the Rule of Law.score: 18.0
    Parliamentary privilege immunises certain activities of legislative bodies and their members from the ordinary law and judicial scrutiny. The rule of law, on the other hand, insists that everyone - including public officials - is subject to the law. Moreover, the rule of law is usually understood to involve judicial review of executive rather than legislative action. Thus, parliamentary privilege seems to establish a public sphere that is beyond the rule of law. Notwithstanding the tension that appears between (...)
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  20. Janet Saltzman Chafetz (2004). Gendered Power and Privilege: Taking Lenski One Step Further. Sociological Theory 22 (2):269-277.score: 18.0
    In Power and Privilege, Gerhard Lenski's theory of the evolution of systems of inequality, he showed some recognition of gender inequality but, as universally accepted in sociology at the time, "social" stratification was conceptualized implicitly as inequality between male household heads. To move from this to explaining gender inequality requires consideration of constructs in addition to those developed by Lenski, but in terms of his typology of societies based on technology and size of economic surplus, the level of gender (...)
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  21. Ann R. Tickamyer (2004). Between Modernism and Postmodernism: Lenski's "Power and Privilege" in the Study of Inequalities. Sociological Theory 22 (2):247-257.score: 18.0
    Gerhard Lenski's classical work on stratification, "Power and Privilege", was an effort to reconcile and to synthesize different approaches to inequality incorporated into the grand theories of the day. It anticipated a variety of developments in the theoretical and empirical understanding of inequalities. These include recognition of the multiplicity of inequalities; emphasis on race, class, gender, and other sources and systems of domination and subordination; and the intersection of these factors in complex patterns to create different standpoints and life (...)
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  22. Alison I. Griffith (1998). Insider / Outsider: Epistemological Privilege and Mothering Work. [REVIEW] Human Studies 21 (4):361-376.score: 18.0
    As researchers, we cannot be outside society and thus activities such as "science," or "objectivity" are striated with procedures for minimizing or celebrating the presence of the researcher in the research product. Our recognition of the situated character of scientific knowledge is the context in which questions about the researchers relation to the group she studies have arisen. The paper begins with a review of the Insider/Outsider debate which circles around the researcher''s relation to those she studies. Where the researcher (...)
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  23. Carolyn Johnston & Genevieve Holt (2006). The Legal and Ethical Implications of Therapeutic Privilege – is It Ever Justified to Withhold Treatment Information From a Competent Patient? Clinical Ethics 1 (3):146-151.score: 18.0
    This article examines the standard of disclosure, set by law, of risks of treatment and alternative procedures that should normally be disclosed to patients. Therapeutic privilege has been recognized by the courts as an exception to this standard of disclosure. It provides a justification for withholding such information from competent patients in the interests of patient welfare. The article explores whether this justification is either legally or ethically defensible. In assessing patient welfare, the health care professional is required to (...)
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  24. Tanja Stähler (2003). Does Hegel Privilege Speech Over Writing? A Critique of Jacques Derrida. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (2):191 – 204.score: 18.0
    In his essay 'The Pit and the Pyramid: Introduction to Hegel's Semiology', Jacques Derrida claims that there is a privilege of speech over writing inherent in Hegel's theory of signs. In this paper, I examine Derrida's criticism. While it is to Derrida's credit that he focusses on an area of Hegel's philosophy that has hardly been analysed, his reading is problematic in several regards. After presenting Derrida's main arguments, I pose three questions, the first of which belongs to the (...)
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  25. Brian Lucas (2013). Religious Confession Privilege and the Common Law [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (1):113.score: 18.0
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: Religious confession privilege and the common law, by Keith Thompson (Leiden: Matinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2011), pp.395, E135.00.
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  26. Jason L. Mallory (2007). 9. Prisoner Oppression and Free World Privilege. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:177-206.score: 18.0
    The position I defend in this paper is that both prisoners and ex-prisoners, at least within present U.S. society, experience a form of oppression that can be distinguished from that inflicted upon other structurally disadvantaged groups. As a result of these U.S. conditions, I also argue that those who have not been or are not currently incarcerated may possess some unearned advantages, similar to but also different from other forms of privilege, such as those based upon race, class, gender, (...)
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  27. Jennifer Evans Marsh (2003). Empirical Support for the United States Supreme Court's Protection of the Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege. Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):385 – 400.score: 18.0
    This study explored relations between willingness to disclose in 5 psychotherapy scenarios and 2 independent variables (privilege condition and previous therapy experience). Scenarios involved suicidal, gravely disabled, physically abusive, and sexually abusive patients, and a police officer patient who shot a suspect. For each of the 5 scenarios, participants in the privilege condition had significantly higher willingness-to-disclose scores than participants in the no-privilege condition. There were no significant differences between willingness-to-disclose scores of participants with and without therapy (...)
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  28. Tim Nieguth (1999). Privilege or Recognition? The Myth of State Neutrality. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):112-131.score: 18.0
    Despite liberalism's considerable internal heterogeneity, liberal approaches to the management of ethno?cultural relations in diverse societies are unified in one respect: they revolve around the implicit assumption that there are three distinct approaches the state can take toward this issue, namely, domination by one cultural group, a politics of recognition, and state neutrality. This articles argues that in the context of an unequal distribution of societal power among ethno?cultural groups there are, in fact, only two basic state approaches to the (...)
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  29. Gay Garland Reed (2011). The Complexity of Moral Learning: Diversity, Deprovincialisation and Privilege. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):359-367.score: 18.0
    This paper explores some complexities of moral learning by referencing personal and professional experiences that shape my moral ecology. Moral learning, like all forms of learning, is not merely accumulative but rather a recursive, adaptive and elaborative process. The multidimensional nature of this phenomenon can be captured by drawing on the language of complexity theory. Using original poetry as a vehicle for distilling thought, and personal experiences of living, learning and teaching inside and outside my home country (in Hawai?i and (...)
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  30. Thomas J. Papadimos (2007). Healthcare Access as a Right, Not a Privilege: A Construct of Western Thought. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):2.score: 18.0
    Over 45 million Americans are uninsured or underinsured. Those living in poverty exhibit the worst health status. Employment, education, income, and race are important factors in a person's ability to acquire healthcare access. Having established that there are people lacking healthcare access due to multi-factorial etiologies, the question arises as to whether the intervention necessary to assist them in obtaining such access should be considered a privilege, or a right. The right to healthcare access is examined from the perspective (...)
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  31. Harry van der Linden (2008). Combatant's Privilege Reconsidered. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:821-821.score: 18.0
    International law grants to legitimate combatants the right to kill enemy soldiers both in wars of aggression and defensive wars. A main argument in support of this “combatant’s privilege” is Michael Walzer’s doctrine of the “moral equality of soldiers.” The doctrine argues that soldiers fighting in wars of aggression and defensive wars have the same moral status because they both typically believe that justice is on their side, and their moral choices are equally severely restricted by the overwhelming coercive (...)
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  32. Mike Redmayne (2007). Rethinking the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (2):209-232.score: 18.0
    While recognized in a large number of jurisdictions, the privilege against self-incrimination proves hard to justify. This article attempts to develop a rationale for the privilege which avoids the usual pitfalls. It argues that the most compelling rationale for the privilege is that it serves as a distancing mechanism, allowing defendants to disassociate themselves from prosecutions. The resulting account has implications for the scope of the privilege. First, it suggests that no distinction should be drawn between (...)
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  33. D. Hook (2011). White Privilege, Psychoanalytic Ethics, and the Limitations of Political Silence. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):494-501.score: 18.0
    The moral and philosophical interrogation of white privilege remains an imperative in post-apartheid South Africa. Whereas the critique of whiteness involves both philosophical and psychological scrutiny, subsequent calls for white political silence and withdrawal have yet to be subjected to adequate psychological analysis. This paper offers such an analysis by questioning, firstly, the idea of appropriate emotions for white South Africans (shame, guilt, regret), posing instead the problems of mimed affect and neurotic goodness. White approaches to guilt-alleviation and political (...)
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  34. Amira Proweller (2010). A Review of “Making Sense of Race, Class, and Gender: Commonsense, Power, and Privilege in the United States”. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 46 (1):139-144.score: 18.0
    (2010). A Review of “Making Sense of Race, Class, and Gender: Commonsense, Power, and Privilege in the United States”. Educational Studies: Vol. 46, No. 1, pp. 139-144.
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  35. Jason Bosland (2011). Republication of Defamation Under the Doctrine of Reportage—The Evolution of Common Law Qualified Privilege in England and Wales. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31 (1):89-110.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the ‘doctrine of reportage’—a particular application of the Reynolds qualified privilege defence to defamation recognized by the House of Lords in Reynolds v Times Newspapers Ltd. The doctrine of reportage provides protection for the neutral reporting (republication) of defamatory allegations made by others in the context of a dispute or controversy of public interest. It is argued in this paper, however, that this emerging defence is doctrinally distinct from the privilege recognized in Reynolds and that (...)
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  36. Mélanie E. de Wit, Clifford M. Marks, Jeffrey P. Natterman & Albert W. Wu (2013). Supporting Second Victims of Patient Safety Events: Shouldn't These Communications Be Covered by Legal Privilege? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):852-858.score: 18.0
    Adverse events that harm patients can also have a harmful impact on health care workers. A few health care organizations have begun to provide psychological support to these Second Victims, but there is uncertainty over whether these discussions are admissible as evidence in malpractice litigation or disciplinary proceedings. We examined the laws governing the admissibility of these communications in 5 states, and address how the laws might affect participation in programs designed to support health care workers involved in adverse events. (...)
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  37. Emily C. Parke (forthcoming). Experiments, Simulations, and Epistemic Privilege. 81 (4):516-536,.score: 18.0
    Experiments are commonly thought to have epistemic privilege over simulations. Two ideas underpin this belief: first, experiments generate greater inferential power than simulations, and second, simulations cannot surprise us the way experiments can. In this article I argue that neither of these claims is true of experiments versus simulations in general. We should give up the common practice of resting in-principle judgments about the epistemic value of cases of scientific inquiry on whether we classify those cases as experiments or (...)
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  38. Naomi Scheman (1993). Engenderings: Constructions of Knowledge, Authority, and Privilege. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Naomi Scheman argues that the concerns of philosophy emerge not from the universal human condition but from conditions of privilege. Her books represents a powerful challenge to the notion that gender makes no difference in the construction of philosophical reasoning. At the same time, it criticizes the narrow focus of most feminist theorizing and calls for a more inclusive form of inquiry.
     
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  39. Nurbay Irmak (2013). The Privilege of the Physical and the Status of Ontological Debates. Philosophical Studies 166 (1 Supplement):1-18.score: 16.0
    Theodore Sider in his latest book provides a defense of the substantivity of the first-order ontological debates against recent deflationary attacks. He articulates and defends several realist theses: (a) nature has an objective structure, (b) there is an objectively privileged language to describe the structure, and (c) ontological debates are substantive. Sider’s defense of metaontological realism, (c), crucially depends on his realism about fundamental languages, (b). I argue that (b) is wrong. As a result, Sider’s metaontological realism fails to establish (...)
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  40. Marian Eide (2008). "The Stigma of Nation": Feminist Just War, Privilege, and Responsibility. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 48-60.score: 16.0
    If women are not yet accorded the full rights of citizenship internationally and especially in the military context, a feminist position on just war may have to be provisional. Drawing on Virginia Woolf's argument referenced in the title, Eide suggests in this essay that feminist theory develop its principles from women's exclusion from national privileges and argues that jus post bellum or justice after war be central to feminist theories of just war.
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  41. Crystal Reeck & Tobias Egner (2011). Affective Privilege: Asymmetric Interference by Emotional Distracters. Frontiers in Psychology 2:232.score: 16.0
    Numerous theories posit that affectively salient stimuli are privileged in their capacity to capture attention and disrupt ongoing cognition. Two underlying assumptions in this theoretical position are that the potency of affective stimuli transcends task boundaries (i.e., emotional distracters do not have to belong to a current task-set to disrupt processing) and that there is an asymmetry between emotional and cognitive processing (i.e., emotional distracters disrupt cognitive processing, but not vice versa). These assumptions have remained largely untested, as common experimental (...)
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  42. Robin James (2013). Oppression, Privilege, & Aesthetics: The Use of the Aesthetic in Theories of Race, Gender, and Sexuality, and the Role of Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Philosophical Aesthetics. Philosophy Compass 8 (2):101-116.score: 15.0
  43. Thomas D. Senor (2006). God's Goodness Needs No Privilege: A Reply to Funkhouser. Faith and Philosophy 23 (4):423-431.score: 15.0
    According to Eric Funkhouser, omnipotence and necessary moral perfection (what Funkhouser calls "impeccability") are not compatible. Funkhouser gives two arguments for this claim. In this paper, I argue that neither of Funkhouser's arguments is sound. The traditional theist can reasonably claim that, contra Funkhouser, (i) there is no possible being who possesses all of God's attributes sans impeccability, and (ii) the fact that there are things that God cannot do does not entail that God lacks omnipotence. Armed with (i) and (...)
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  44. Kareem Khalifa (2010). Default Privilege and Bad Lots: Underconsideration and Explanatory Inference. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):91 – 105.score: 15.0
    The underconsideration argument against inference to the best explanation and scientific realism holds that scientists are not warranted in inferring that the best theory is true, because scientists only ever conceive of a small handful of theories at one time, and as a result, they may not have considered a true theory. However, antirealists have not developed a detailed alternative account of why explanatory inference nevertheless appears so central to scientific practice. In this paper, I provide new defences against some (...)
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  45. Lisa A. Bergin (2002). Testimony, Epistemic Difference, and Privilege: How Feminist Epistemology Can Improve Our Understanding of the Communication of Knowledge. Social Epistemology 16 (3):197 – 213.score: 15.0
  46. Naomi Seiler (2003). Identifying Racial Privilege: Lessons From Critical Race Theory and the Law. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):24 – 25.score: 15.0
  47. Brian Leiter (2000). Nietzsche's Metaethics: Against the Privilege Readings. European Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):277–297.score: 15.0
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