Search results for 'Processes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    Sergio A. Gallegos (2016). The Explanatory Role of Abstraction Processes in Models: The Case of Aggregations. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:161-167.
    Though it is held that some models in science have explanatory value, there is no conclusive agreement on what provides them with this value. One common view is that models have explanatory value vis-à-vis some target systems because they are developed using an abstraction process. Though I think this is correct, I believe it is not the whole picture. In this paper, I argue that, in addition to the well-known process of abstraction understood as an omission of features or information, (...)
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  2.  48
    William Hirstein & Katrina Sifferd (2011). The Legal Self: Executive Processes and Legal Theory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):151-176.
    When laws or legal principles mention mental states such as intentions to form a contract, knowledge of risk, or purposely causing a death, what parts of the brain are they speaking about? We argue here that these principles are tacitly directed at our prefrontal executive processes. Our current best theories of consciousness portray it as a workspace in which executive processes operate, but what is important to the law is what is done with the workspace content rather than (...)
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  3.  12
    Barbara M. Sattler (2010). A Time for Learning and for Counting – Egyptians, Greeks and Empirical Processes in Plato’s Timaeus. In Richard Mohr & Barbara M. Sattler (eds.), One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today. Parmenides Press 249-266.
    This paper argues that processes in the sensible realm can be in accord with reason in the Timaeus, since rationality is understood here as being based on regularity, which is conferred onto processes by time. Plato uses two different temporal structures in the Timaeus, associated with the contrast there drawn between Greek and Egyptian approaches to history. The linear order of before and after marks natural processes as rational and underlies the Greek treatment of history. By contrast, (...)
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  4. Daniel M. Wegner (2005). Who is the Controller of Controlled Processes? In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 19-36.
    Are we the robots? This question surfaces often in current psychological re- search, as various kinds of robot parts-automatic actions, mental mechanisms, even neural circuits-keep appearing in our explanations of human behavior. Automatic processes seem responsible for a wide range of the things we do, a fact that may leave us feeling, if not fully robotic, at least a bit nonhuman. The complement of the automatic process in contemporary psychology, of course, is the controlled process (Atkinson & Shiffrin, 1968; (...)
     
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  5.  9
    Marc Jekel, Andreas Glöckner, Susann Fiedler & Arndt Bröder (2012). The Rationality of Different Kinds of Intuitive Decision Processes. Synthese 189 (S1):147-160.
    Whereas classic work in judgment and decision making has focused on the deviation of intuition from rationality, more recent research has focused on the performance of intuition in real-world environments. Borrowing from both approaches, we investigate to which extent competing models of intuitive probabilistic decision making overlap with choices according to the axioms of probability theory and how accurate those models can be expected to perform in real-world environments. Specifically, we assessed to which extent heuristics, models implementing weighted additive information (...)
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  6. Marco Mazzone (2011). Schemata and Associative Processes in Pragmatics. Journal of Pragmatics 43 (8):2148-2159.
    The notion of schema has been given a major role by Recanati within his conception of primary pragmatic processes, conceived as a type of associative process. I intend to show that Recanati’s considerations on schemata may challenge the relevance theorist’s argument against associative explanations in pragmatics, and support an argument in favor of associative (versus inferential) explanations. More generally, associative relations can be shown to be schematic, that is, they have enough structure to license inferential effects without any appeal (...)
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  7.  52
    William Hirstein (2011). The Contribution of Prefrontal Executive Processes to Creating a Sense of Self. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):150-158.
    According to several current theories, executive processes help achieve various mental actions such as remembering, planning and decision-making, by executing cognitive operations on representations held in consciousness. I plan to argue that these executive processes are partly responsible for our sense of self, because of the way they produce the impression of an active, controlling presence in consciousness. If we examine what philosophers have said about the "ego" (Descartes), "the Self" (Locke and Hume), the "self of all selves" (...)
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  8.  16
    Albert Newen (forthcoming). What Are Cognitive Processes? An Example-Based Approach. Synthese:1-18.
    The question “What are cognitive processes?” can be understood variously as meaning “What is the nature of cognitive processes?”, “Can we distinguish epistemically cognitive processes from physical and biochemical processes on the one hand, and from mental or conscious processes on the other?”, and “Can we establish a fruitful notion of cognitive process?” The present aim is to deliver a positive answer to the last question by developing criteria for what would count as a paradigmatic (...)
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  9.  24
    Goran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh, Emily Carasco & Michael Callaghan (2009). Ethical Structures and Processes of Corporations Operating in Australia, Canada, and Sweden: A Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):485 - 506.
    Based on the 'Partnership Model of Corporate Ethics' (Wood, 2002), this study examines the ethical structures and processes that are put in place by organizations to enhance the ethical business behavior of staff. The study examines the use of these structures and processes amongst the top companies in the three countries of Australia, Canada, and Sweden over two time periods (2001–2002 and 2005–2006). Subsequendy, a combined comparative and longitudinal approach is applied in the study, which we contend is (...)
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  10.  19
    Marie-Louise Risgaard, Pia Frederiksen & Pernille Kaltoft (2007). Socio-Cultural Processes Behind the Differential Distribution of Organic Farming in Denmark: A Case Study. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):445-459.
    Conversion to organic farming, along with its associated driving forces and barriers, has been explored intensively over the past decade, while studies on the distribution and impacts of local socio-cultural processes in relation to conversion to and diffusion of organic farming have been scarce. The concentration of organic farms in Denmark differs according to county and, moreover, there appears to be large within-county variation in the density of organic farms. The present study explores local aspects of conversion to organic (...)
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  11.  18
    Larissa K. Samuelson, Gavin W. Jenkins & John P. Spencer (2015). Grounding Cognitive‐Level Processes in Behavior: The View From Dynamic Systems Theory. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2):191-205.
    Marr's seminal work laid out a program of research by specifying key questions for cognitive science at different levels of analysis. Because dynamic systems theory focuses on time and interdependence of components, DST research programs come to very different conclusions regarding the nature of cognitive change. We review a specific DST approach to cognitive-level processes: dynamic field theory. We review research applying DFT to several cognitive-level processes: object permanence, naming hierarchical categories, and inferring intent, that demonstrate the difference (...)
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  12.  12
    David A. Gallo & John G. Seamon (2004). Are Nonconscious Processes Sufficient to Produce False Memories? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):158-168.
    Seamon, Luo, and Gallo reported evidence that nonconscious processes could produce false recognition in a converging-associates task, whereby subjects falsely remember a nonstudied lure after studying a list of related words . Zeelenberg, Plomp, and Raaijmakers failed to observe this false recognition effect when list word recognition was at chance. We critically evaluate the evidence for nonsconscious processing and report the results of a new experiment designed to overcome previous methodological limitations. Consistent with Seamon et al., we found that (...)
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  13.  1
    Daniel Patrone & David Resnik (2011). Pandemic Ventilator Rationing and Appeals Processes. Health Care Analysis 19 (2):165-179.
    In a severe influenza pandemic, hospitals will likely experience serious and widespread shortages of patient pulmonary ventilators and of staff qualified to operate them. Deciding who will receive access to mechanical ventilation will often determine who lives and who dies. This prospect raises an important question whether pandemic preparedness plans should include some process by which individuals affected by ventilator rationing would have the opportunity to appeal adverse decisions. However, the issue of appeals processes to ventilator rationing decisions has (...)
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  14.  4
    Fritz Böhle (1994). Relevance of Experience-Based Work in Modern Processes. AI and Society 8 (3):207-215.
    The increasing use of computer-cont rolled automation systems has brought with it a bias towards a purely scientific approach to work. This tends to undermine the significance of experiential knowledge and sensory perception when working with highly automated processes. This paper argues for a recognition of the importance of subjectifying action in carrying out work practices. Without it, complex technical systems cannot be effectively operated. Moreover, the contradictory demands that arise for workers could have negative consequences in terms of (...)
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  15.  42
    Michelene T. H. Chi, Rod D. Roscoe, James D. Slotta, Marguerite Roy & Catherine C. Chase (2012). Misconceived Causal Explanations for Emergent Processes. Cognitive Science 36 (1):1-61.
    Studies exploring how students learn and understand science processes such as diffusion and natural selection typically find that students provide misconceived explanations of how the patterns of such processes arise (such as why giraffes’ necks get longer over generations, or how ink dropped into water appears to “flow”). Instead of explaining the patterns of these processes as emerging from the collective interactions of all the agents (e.g., both the water and the ink molecules), students often explain the (...)
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  16.  23
    Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers & René Zeelenberg (2004). Evaluating the Evidence for Nonconscious Processes in Producing False Memories. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):169-172.
    In response to the failure of Zeelenberg, Plomp, and Raaijmakers to replicate the results of Seamon, Luo, and Gallo regarding their purported finding of a reliable false memory effect in the absence of memory for the list items, Gallo and Seamon report a new experiment that they claim shows that conscious activation of a related lure during study is not necessary for its subsequent recognition. We critically evaluate their conclusion and argue that the evidence clearly shows that false recognition is (...)
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  17.  27
    Frank van der Velde & Marc de Kamps (2002). Synchrony in the Eye of the Beholder: An Analysis of the Role of Neural Synchronization in Cognitive Processes. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):291-312.
    We discuss the role of synchrony of activationin higher-level cognitive processes. Inparticular, we analyze the question of whethersynchrony of activation provides a mechanismfor compositional representation in neuralsystems. We will argue that synchrony ofactivation does not provide a mechanism forcompositional representation in neural systems.At face value, one can identify a level ofcompositional representation in the models thatintroduce synchrony of activation for thispurpose. But behavior in these models isalways produced by means conjunctiverepresentations in the form of coincidencedetectors. Therefore, models that rely (...)
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  18.  24
    Stefan Dragulinescu (2012). The Problem of Processes and Transitions: Are Diseases Phase Kinds? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):79-89.
    In this paper I discuss a central objection against diseases being natural kinds—namely, that diseases are processes or transitions and hence they should not be conceptualized in the ‘substantish’ framework of natural kinds. I indicate that the objection hinges on conceiving disease kinds as phase kinds, in contrast to the non-phase, natural kinds of the exact sciences. I focus on somatic diseases and argue, via a representative comparison, that if disease kinds are phase kinds, then exact science kinds are (...)
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  19.  12
    R. Bernabei, P. Belli, F. Cappella, R. Cerulli, C. J. Dai, A. D'Angelo, H. L. He, A. Incicchitti, H. H. Kuang, X. H. Ma, F. Montecchia, F. Nozzoli, D. Prosperi, X. D. Sheng & Z. P. Ye (2010). Non-Paulian Nuclear Processes in Highly Radiopure NaI(Tl): Status and Perspectives. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (7):807-813.
    Searches for non-paulian nuclear processes, i.e. processes normally forbidden by the Pauli–Exclusion–Principle (PEP) with highly radiopure NaI(Tl) scintillators allow the test of this fundamental principle with high sensitivity. Status and perspectives are addressed.
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  20.  33
    John Heil (1970). Sensations, Experiences, and Brain Processes. Philosophy 45 (July):221-6.
    In his defence of the identity theory, Professor Smart has attempted to show that reports of mental states are strictly topic-neutral. If this were the case then it would follow that there is nothing logically wrong with the claim that the mind is the brain or that mental states are really nothing but brain states. Some phillosophers have argued that a fundamental objection to any form of materialism is that the latter makes an obvious logical blunder in identifying the mental (...)
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  21.  8
    Tom Lindstrøm (2008). Nonlinear Stochastic Integrals for Hyperfinite Lévy Processes. Logic and Analysis 1 (2):91-129.
    I develop a notion of nonlinear stochastic integrals for hyperfinite Lévy processes and use it to find exact formulas for expressions which are intuitively of the form $\sum_{s=0}^t\phi(\omega,dl_{s},s)$ and $\prod_{s=0}^t\psi(\omega,dl_{s},s)$ , where l is a Lévy process. These formulas are then applied to geometric Lévy processes, infinitesimal transformations of hyperfinite Lévy processes, and to minimal martingale measures. Some of the central concepts and results are closely related to those found in S. Cohen’s work on stochastic calculus for (...)
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  22.  21
    Joseph M. Notterman (2000). Note on Reductionism in Cognitive Psychology: Reification of Cognitive Processes Into Mind, Mind-Brain Equivalence, and Brain-Computer Analogy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):116-121.
    This note brings together three phenomena leading to a tendency toward reductionism in cognitive psychology. They are the reification of cognitive processes into an entity called mind; the identification of the mind with the brain; and the congruence by analogy of the brain with the digital computer. Also indicated is the need to continue studying the effects upon behavior of variables other than brain function. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  23. Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood (2001). Attention and Alerting: Cognitive Processes Spared in Blindsight. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press 163-181.
  24.  2
    Mary Rute Gomes Esperandio & Alexsander Cordeiro Lopes (2012). Juventude e religiosidade: Cartografia dos processos de subjetivação de jovens católicos em uma comunidade de fé (Youth and religiousness: mapping the subjectivation processes of the catholic youth in a community of faith). Horizonte 10 (26):476-499.
    Juventude e religiosidade: Cartografia dos processos de subjetivação de jovens católicos em uma comunidade de fé (Youth and religiousness: mapping the subjectivation processes of the catholic youth in a community of faith). DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012.v10n26p476. Este estudo apresenta os resultados de uma pesquisa motivada pela constatação de que muitas subjetividades juvenis católicas do Brasil vivem uma situação de fragmentação que faz emergir distintos grupos identitários e em graves conflitos no seio das comunidades de fé. Por meio da realização de uma (...)
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  25.  2
    Fayme Yeates, Andy J. Wills, Fergal W. Jones & Ian P. L. McLaren (2015). State‐Trace Analysis: Dissociable Processes in a Connectionist Network? Cognitive Science 39 (5):1047-1061.
    Some argue the common practice of inferring multiple processes or systems from a dissociation is flawed. One proposed solution is state-trace analysis, which involves plotting, across two or more conditions of interest, performance measured by either two dependent variables, or two conditions of the same dependent measure. The resulting analysis is considered to provide evidence that either a single process underlies performance or there is evidence for more than one process. This article reports simulations using the simple recurrent network (...)
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  26. M. Oswald & Volker Gadenne (2000). Are Controlled Processes Conscious? In Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.), Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates 87--101.
     
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  27. Abraham Rudnick (2007). Processes and Pitfalls of Dialogical Bioethics. Health Care Analysis 15 (2):123-135.
    Bioethics uses various theories, methods and institutions for its decision-making. Lately, a dialogical, i.e., dialogue-based, approach has been argued for in bioethics. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the decision-making processes that may be involved in this dialogical approach, as well as related pitfalls that may have to be addressed in order for this approach to be helpful, particularly in clinical ethics. Using informal logic, an analysis is presented of the notion of dialogue and of (...)
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  28. Markus Kiefer & Doreen Brendel (2006). Attentional Modulation of Unconscious "Automatic" Processes: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials in a Masked Priming Paradigm. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 18 (2):184-198.
  29. René Zeelenberg, Gijs Plomp & Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers (2003). Can False Memories Be Created Through Nonconscious Processes? Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):403-412.
    Presentation times of study words presented in the Deese/Roediger and McDermott (DRM) paradigm varied from 20 to 2000 ms per word in an attempt to replicate the false memory effect following extremely short presentations reported by . Both in a within-subjects design (Experiment 1) and in a between-subjects design (Experiment 2) subjects showed memory for studied words as well as a false memory effect for related critical lures in the 2000-ms condition. However, in the conditions with shorter presentation times (20 (...)
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  30.  2
    F. J. McGuigan & G. V. Pavek (1972). On the Psychophysiological Identification of Covert Nonoral Language Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (2):237.
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  31.  3
    Edward E. Smith & Gerald D. Nielsen (1970). Representations and Retrieval Processes in Short-Term Memory: Recognition and Recall of Faces. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):397.
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  32. Keith Frankish & Jonathan St B. T. Evans (eds.) (2009). In Two Minds: Dual Processes and Beyond. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the idea that we have two minds - automatic, unconscious, and fast, the other controlled, conscious, and slow. In recent years there has been great interest in so-called dual-process theories of reasoning and rationality. According to such theories, there are two distinct systems underlying human reasoning - an evolutionarily old system that is associative, automatic, unconscious, parallel, and fast, and a more recent, distinctively human system that is rule-based, controlled, conscious, serial, and slow. Within the former, (...) the former, processes are held to be innate and to use heuristics that evolved to solve specific adaptive problems. In the latter, processes are taken to be learned, flexible, and responsive to rational norms. -/- Despite the attention these theories are attracting, there is still poor communication between dual-process theorists themselves, and the substantial bodies of work on dual processes in cognitive psychology and social psychology remain isolated from each other. This book brings together leading researchers on dual processes to summarize the state-of-the-art, highlight key issues, present different perspectives, explore implications, and provide a stimulus to further work. It includes new ideas about the human mind both by contemporary philosophers interested in broad theoretical questions about mental architecture and by psychologists specialising in traditionally distinct and isolated fields. For all those in the cognitive sciences, this is a book that will advance dual-process theorizing, promote interdisciplinary communication, and encourage further applications of dual-process approaches. (shrink)
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  33.  2
    Endel Tulving & Donald M. Thomson (1971). Retrieval Processes in Recognition Memory: Effects of Associative Context. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):116.
  34.  27
    Irene Roozen, Patrick De Pelsmacker & Frank Bostyn (2001). The Ethical Dimensions of Decision Processes of Employees. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):87 - 99.
    The influence of stakeholders, organisational commitment, personal values, goals of the organisation and socio-demographic characteristics of individuals on the ethical dimension of behavioural intentions of employees in various organisations are investigated. The research results show that employees working for the public sector or in educational institutions take more ethical aspects into account than employees working in the "private" sector. The influence of stakeholders and organisational commitment do not significantly affect the ethical behaviour of employees, and only some personal values and (...)
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  35. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Psychology Press.
  36.  20
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Haluk Ogmen & Jian Chen (2004). Unconscious Priming by Color and Form: Different Processes and Levels. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):138-157.
    Using a metacontrast masking paradigm, prior studies have shown that a target’s color information and form information, can be processed without awareness and that unconscious color processing occurs at early, wavelength-dependent levels in the cortical information processing hierarchy. Here we used a combination of paracontrast and metacontrast masking techniques to explore unconscious color and form priming effects produced by blue, green, and neutral stimuli. We found that color priming in normal observers is significantly reduced when an additional paracontrast mask precedes (...)
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  37.  1
    Endel Tulving & Roy D. Patterson (1968). Functional Units and Retrieval Processes in Free Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2):239.
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  38. J. J. C. Smart (1961). Further Remarks on Sensations and Brain Processes. Philosophical Review 70 (July):406-407.
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  39.  2
    Claudia Pagliari, Jeremy Grimshaw & Martin Eccles (2001). The Potential Influence of Small Group Processes on Guideline Development. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (2):165-173.
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  40. Jerome A. Shaffer (1961). Could Mental States Be Brain Processes? Journal of Philosophy 58 (December):813-22.
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  41. Tobias Egner & Amir Raz (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 29-50.
  42.  1
    Johnrob Bantang & Caesar Saloma (2006). Co‐Existence of Poisson and Non‐Poisson Processes in Ordered Parallel Multilane Pedestrian Traffic. Complexity 11 (6):35-42.
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  43.  50
    J. Feinstein, M. Stein, G. Castillo & M. Paulus (2004). From Sensory Processes to Conscious Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):323-335.
    In recent years, cognitive neuroscientists have began to explore the process of how sensory information gains access to awareness. To further probe this process, event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used while testing subjects with a paradigm known as the “attentional blink.” In this paradigm, visually presented information sporadically fails to reach awareness. It was found that the magnitude and time course of activation within the anterior cingulate , medial prefrontal cortex , and frontopolar cortex predicted whether or not information (...)
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  44.  11
    John J. Furedy & Karl Schiffman (1973). Concurrent Measurement of Autonomic and Cognitive Processes in a Test of the Traditional Discriminative Control Procedure for Pavlovian Electrodermal Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):210.
  45.  28
    María G. Navarro (2010). Intelligent Environments and the Challenge of Inferential Processes. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 72 (2):309-326.
  46.  50
    M. C. Bradley (1963). Sensations, Brain-Processes, and Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):385-93.
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  47.  47
    Robert C. Coburn (1963). Shaffer on the Identity of Mental States and Brain Processes. Journal of Philosophy 60 (February):89-92.
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  48.  8
    E. A. Haggard (1943). Experimental Studies in Affective Processes: I. Some Effects of Cognitive Structure and Active Participation on Certain Autonomic Reactions During and Following Experimentally Induced Stress. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (4):257.
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  49.  23
    Joseph Margolis (1965). Brain Processes and Sensations. Theoria 31 (2):133-38.
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  50.  8
    Katharine I. Blick (1969). Decision and Decay Processes in the Short-Term Memory for Length. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):224.
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