Search results for 'Professional Autonomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jan Hoogland & Henk Jochemsen (2000). Professional Autonomy and the Normative Structure of Medical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):457-475.score: 240.0
    Professional autonomy is often described as a claim of professionalsthat has to serve primarily their own interests. However, it can also beseen as an element of a professional ideal that can function as astandard for professional, i.e. medical practice. This normativeunderstanding of the medical profession and professional autonomy facesthree threats today. 1) Internal erosion of professional autonomy due toa lack of internal quality control by the medical profession; 2)the increasing upward pressure on (...)
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  2. John J. Polder & Henk Jochemsen (2000). Professional Autonomy in the Health Care System. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):477-491.score: 240.0
    Professional autonomy interferes at a structural level with the variousaspects of the health care system. The health care systems that can bedistinguished all feature a specific design of professional autonomy,but experience their own governance problems. Empirical health caresystems in the West are a nationally coloured blend of ideal type healthcare systems. From a normative perspective, the optimal health caresystem should consist of elements of all the ideal types. A workableoptimum taking national values into account could be (...)
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  3. Dario Sacchini & Leonardo Antico (2000). The Professional Autonomy of the Medical Doctor in Italy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):441-456.score: 240.0
    This contribution deals with the issue of the professional autonomy ofthe medical doctor. Worldwide, the physician's autonomy is guaranteedand limited, first of all, by Codes of Medical Ethics. InItaly, the latest version of the national Code of MedicalEthics (Code 1998) was published in 1998 by the Federation ofprovincial Medical Associations (FnomCeO). The Code 1998acknowledges the physician's autonomy regarding the scheduling, thechoice and application of diagnostic and therapeutic means, within theprinciples of professional responsibility. This responsibility has (...)
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  4. H. M. Dupuis (2000). Professional Autonomy: A Stumbling Block for Good Medical Practice. An Analysis and Interpretation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):493-502.score: 240.0
    In this article the various descriptions and interpretations ofprofessional autonomy, as have been given in the articles from Belgium,Italy and the UK are subjected to a further analysis. The implicit claimthat professional autonomy of physicians is beneficial for the health ofpatients is scrutinized and is proven to be untrue and invalid. Theconclusion is that professional autonomy is more directed at theinterests of physicians than of those of patients and deserves nospecial place in health care.
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  5. Herman Nys & Paul Schotsmans (2000). Professional Autonomy in Belgium. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):425-439.score: 240.0
    The Belgian health care system has a few features that may havecontributed to the rising costs of health care: patients' freechoice of physicians, large clinical freedom of physicians, essentiallya fee-for-service remuneration for medical specialists in which the feesare agreed between insurance funds and physicians. The increased medicalconsumption and costs have prompted the state and insurance companies totake measures that limit the professional autonomy of the physicians.Access to medical education, free until 1997, is now restricted. Themedical profession is organized (...)
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  6. Henk Ten Have (2000). Re-Evaluating Professional Autonomy in Health Care. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):503-513.score: 240.0
    Professional autonomy, as the symbol of the traditional freedom ofdecision-making of medical professionals is criticized. This essayexamines the critique. It analyses the underlying assumption that theautonomy of health professionals is incompatible with the need fororganisation and management in order to control rising health carecosts. It is argued that the concept of professional autonomy should beredefined, not through restricting the decision-making freedom ofindividual health professionals, but through expanding the concept intothe sphere of management, so that managers will (...)
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  7. Henk Ten Have (2000). Re-Evaluating Professional Autonomy in Health Care. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5).score: 180.0
    Professional autonomy, as the symbol of the traditional freedom ofdecision-making of medical professionals is criticized. This essayexamines the critique. It analyses the underlying assumption that theautonomy of health professionals is incompatible with the need fororganisation and management in order to control rising health carecosts. It is argued that the concept of professional autonomy should beredefined, not through restricting the decision-making freedom ofindividual health professionals, but through expanding the concept intothe sphere of management, so that managers will (...)
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  8. Eric Gampel (2006). Does Professional Autonomy Protect Medical Futility Judgments? Bioethics 20 (2):92-104.score: 162.0
  9. Michael Davis (1996). Professional Autonomy. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):441-460.score: 162.0
    Employed professionals (e.g., accountants or engineers)-and those who study them-sometimes claim that their status as employeesdenies them the “autonomy” necessary to be “true professionals.” Is this a conceptual claim or an empirical claim? How might it be proved or disproved? This paper draws on recent work on autonomy to try to answer these questions. In the course of doing that, it identifies three literatures concerned with autonomy and suggests an approach bringing them together in a way likely (...)
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  10. George J. Agich (1990). Rationing and Professional Autonomy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (1-2):77-84.score: 150.0
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  11. Asa Kasher (2005). Professional Ethics and Collective Professional Autonomy. Ethical Perspectives 12 (1):67-97.score: 150.0
  12. Ericgampel (2006). Does Professional Autonomy Protect Medical Futility Judgments? Bioethics 20 (2):92–104.score: 150.0
  13. Chris Macdonald (2002). Relational Professional Autonomy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (03):282-289.score: 150.0
  14. Michael Davis (forthcoming). Professional Autonomy: A Framework for Empirical Research. Business Ethics Quarterly.score: 150.0
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  15. Gloria Lankshear & David Mason (2001). Technology and Ethical Dilemmas in a Medical Setting: Privacy, Professional Autonomy, Life and Death. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):223-233.score: 150.0
    A growing literature addresses the ethicalimplications of electronic surveillance atwork, frequently assigning ethical priority tovalues such as the right to privacy. Thispaper suggests that, in practice, the issuesare sociologically more complex than someaccounts suggest. This is because manyworkplace electronic technologies not designedor deployed for surveillance purposesnevertheless embody surveillance capacity. Thiscapacity may not be immediately obvious toparticipants or lend itself to simpledeployment. Moreover, because of their primaryfunctions, such systems embody a range of otherfeatures which are potentially beneficial forthose utilising them. As (...)
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  16. Zehra Goçmen Baykara & Serap Şahinoğlu (forthcoming). An Evaluation of Nurses' Professional Autonomy in Turkey. Nursing Ethics.score: 150.0
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  17. Z. G. Baykara & S. Ahino Lu (2014). An Evaluation of Nurses' Professional Autonomy in Turkey. Nursing Ethics 21 (4):447-460.score: 150.0
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  18. Constance Perry, Linda Quinn & L. Nelson (2001). Birth Plans and Professional Autonomy. Hastings Center Report 32 (2):12.score: 150.0
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  19. Andrew M. Francis (2007). Legal Ethics, Moral Agency and Professional Autonomy: The Unbearable Ethics of Being (a Legal Executive). Legal Ethics 10 (2):131-153.score: 150.0
  20. Eric Molleman, Manda Broekhuis, Renee Stoffels & Frans Jaspers (2008). How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals. Health Care Analysis 16 (4):329-341.score: 150.0
    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have analyzed the impact of these two types of cooperation on perceived professional autonomy. Two teams were studied, one team dealing with geriatric patients and another treating oncology patients. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews, studied written documents, held informal discussions (...)
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  21. David T. Ozar (1984). Patients' Autonomy: Three Models of the Professional-Lay Relationship in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1).score: 144.0
    Health care is not merely a matter of individual encounters between patients and physicians or other health care personnel. For patients and those who provide health care come to these encounters already possessed of learned habits of perception and judgment, valuation and action, which define their roles in relation to one another and affect every aspect of their encounter. So the presuppositions of these encounters must be examined if our understanding of patients' autonomy is to be complete. In this (...)
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  22. M. Ardagh (1999). Resurrecting Autonomy During Resuscitation--The Concept of Professional Substituted Judgment. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):375-378.score: 144.0
    The urgency of the resuscitation and the impaired ability of the patient to make a reasonable autonomous decision both conspire against adequate consideration of the principles of medical ethics. Informed consent is usually not possible for these reasons and this leads many to consider that consent is not required for resuscitation, because resuscitation brings benefit and prevents harm and because the patient is not in a position to give or withhold consent. However, consent for resuscitation is required and the common (...)
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  23. J. Wilson-Barnett (1989). Limited Autonomy and Partnership: Professional Relationships in Health Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (1):12-16.score: 144.0
    Principles of autonomy and self-determination have been upheld as vital to modern-day medical and ethical practice. However, the complexities of current health care and changes in the expectation of some patients and their families justify a review of such concepts. Their limitations and relativities may suggest that other descriptions of partnership and negotiated goal-setting, while based on respect for autonomy, reflect more modern and ideal multi-disciplinary practices. Discussion should extend beyond the 'classic' participants of patient and doctor to (...)
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  24. Hywel Thomas & Tian Qiu (2013). Continuing Professional Development: Accountability, Autonomy, Efficiency and Equity in Five Professions. British Journal of Educational Studies 61 (2):161-186.score: 144.0
    ABSTRACT We examine the influence of neo-liberalism in re-shaping the accountability of five professional groups (accountants, solicitors, social workers, nurses and doctors) and its consequence for their CPD policies. Documentary analysis and Quarterly Labour Force Survey data (n=31,260) from the 1990s to the present are integrated in a comparative method which examines whether changes are specific to a profession or represent more general patterns. Using complementary theories from neo-liberal economics and the sociology of professionalism, we show how regulatory oversight (...)
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  25. Finn Daniel Raaen (2011). Autonomy, Candour and Professional Teacher Practice: A Discussion Inspired by the Later Works of Michel Foucault. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):627-641.score: 132.0
    Autonomy is considered to be an important feature of professionals and to provide a necessary basis for their informed judgments. In this article these notions will be challenged. In this article I use Michel Foucault's deconstruction of the idea of the autonomous citizen, and his later attempts to reconstruct that idea, in order to bring some new perspectives to the discussion about the foundation of professionalism. The turning point in Foucault's discussion about autonomy is to be found in (...)
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  26. Herman P. Meininger (2001). Autonomy and Professional Responsibility in Care for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities. Nursing Philosophy 2 (3):240–250.score: 132.0
  27. Kathia Serrano-Velarde (2014). Rising Above Institutional Constraints? The Quest of German Accreditation Agencies for Autonomy and Professional Legitimacy. Minerva 52 (1):97-118.score: 126.0
    European quality assurance has a complicated history that must be viewed as taking place on two levels: first, in a national effort to deregulate the public sector and to make universities accountable for their teaching performance; and second, a supranational endeavor to accomplish European integration in the field of higher education. Similarly, the web of institutional constraints and opportunity structures in which accreditation agencies are embedded spans two policy levels, the national and the European. In this paper, we examine how (...)
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  28. Jukka Varelius (2008). Ethics Consultation and Autonomy. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):65-76.score: 120.0
    Services of ethics consultants are nowadays commonly used in such various spheres of life as engineering, public administration, business, law, health care, journalism, and scientific research. It has however been maintained that use of ethics consultants is incompatible with personal autonomy; in moral matters individuals should be allowed to make their own decisions. The problem this criticism refers to can be conceived of as a conflict between the professional autonomy of ethics experts and the autonomy of (...)
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  29. Stefan Timmermans (2005). From Autonomy to Accountability: The Role of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Professional Power. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (4):490-501.score: 120.0
  30. Henk Jochemsen & Henk ten Have (2000). The Autonomy of the Health Professional: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):405-408.score: 120.0
  31. Frank A. Chervenak & Laurence B. McCullough (2012). The Professional Responsibility Model of Respect for Autonomy in Decision Making About Cesarean Delivery. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):1 - 2.score: 120.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 7, Page 1-2, July 2012.
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  32. J. Stuart Horner (2000). Autonomy in the Medical Profession in the United Kingdom – an Historical Perspective. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):409-423.score: 120.0
    This paper reviews the concept of professional autonomy from anhistorical perspective. It became formalised in the United Kingdom onlyafter a long struggle throughout most of the nineteenth century. In itspure form professional autonomy implies unlimited powers to undertakemedical investigations and to prescribe treatment, irrespective of cost.Doctors alone should determine the quality of care and the levels ofremuneration to which they should be entitled. In the second half of thetwentieth century a steady erosion of professional (...) occurred inthe United Kingdom. The level of remuneration has been restricted formost doctors for nearly fifty years, whilst the costs of health carehave steadily reduced the doctor's ability to provide unrestricted carewithin the health care system. Reorganisation of the National HealthService in 1983 and 1991 has substantially eroded professional autonomy,to the point where research developments, clinical judgement and ethicalstandards are all now being placed at risk. (shrink)
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  33. Henk Jochemsen & Henk ten Have (2000). The Autonomy of the Health Professional: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):405-408.score: 120.0
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  34. Renato A. Schibeci & Ruth L. Hickey (2004). Dimensions of Autonomy: Primary Teachers' Decisions About Involvement in Science Professional Development. Science Education 88 (1):119-145.score: 120.0
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  35. A. H. Vedder (2002). Review of the Book Autonomy and Clinical Medicine-Renewing the Health Professional Relation with the Patient, J. Bergsma & DC Thomasma, 2000, 0792362071. [REVIEW] In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. 16--382.score: 120.0
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  36. N. Hanna (1998). Review Article. Challenging Medical Decision-Making: Professional Dominance, Patient Rights or Collaborative Autonomy? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (1):143-152.score: 120.0
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  37. Yvonne Lau & Chrystal Jaye (2009). The 'Obligation' to Screen and its Effect on Autonomy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):495-505.score: 102.0
    In the United States, disease screening is offered to the public as a consumer service. It has been proposed that the act of “consumption” is a manifestation of agency and that the decision to consume is an exercise of autonomy. The enthusiasm of the American public for disease screening and the expansion in the demand for all sorts of disease screening in recent years can be viewed as an expression of such autonomy. Here, we argue that the enthusiasm (...)
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  38. Lucie White (2010). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians. Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3 (1).score: 102.0
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look at two influential (...)
     
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  39. Frans Jacobs (2005). Reasonable Partiality in Professional Ethics: The Moral Division of Labour. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):141 - 154.score: 96.0
    Attention is given to a background idea that is often invoked in discussions about reasonable partiality: the idea of a moral division of labour. It is not only a right, but also a duty for professionals to attend (almost) exclusively to the interests of their own clients, because their partial activities are part of an impartial scheme providing for an allocation of professional help to all clients. To clarify that idea, a difference is made between two kinds of division (...)
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  40. Rosemary Bryant (2007). Contradictions in the Concept of Professional Culpability. Health Care Analysis 15 (2):137-152.score: 96.0
    Increasing recognition of adverse events in health care is wide spread. Implementing improved system arrangements, which prevent adverse events taking place rather than focussing on individual culpability is increasingly being recognised as a more effective preventative strategy. But does such a perspective mean individual health practitioners remain accountable for their practice? This article explores the philosophical, psychological and professional contradictions inherent in attempting to understand where the responsibility for our actions lies and concludes by arguing that while the case (...)
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  41. Michiel Brumsen & Ibo van de Poel (2001). A Special Section on Research in Engineering Ethics Towards a Research Programme for Ethics and Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):365-378.score: 90.0
    In this editorial contribution, two issues relevant to the question, what should be at the top of the research agenda for ethics and technology, are identified and discussed. Firstly: can, and do, engineers make a difference to the degree to which technology leads to morally desirable outcomes? What role does professional autonomy play here, and what are its limits? And secondly, what should be the scope of engineers’ responsibility; that is to say, on which issues are they, as (...)
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  42. George J. Agich (1993). Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    The realities and myths of long-term care and the challenges it poses for the ethics of autonomy are analyzed in this perceptive work. The book defends the concept of autonomy, but argues that the standard view of autonomy as non-interference and independence has only a limited applicability for long term care. The treatment of actual autonomy stresses the developmental and social nature of human persons and the priority of identification over autonomous choice. The work balances analysis (...)
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  43. Karey Harwood (2009). Egg Freezing: A Breakthrough for Reproductive Autonomy? Bioethics 23 (1):39-46.score: 84.0
    This article describes the relatively new technology of freezing human eggs and examines whether egg freezing, specifically when it is used by healthy women as 'insurance' against age-related infertility, is a legitimate exercise of reproductive autonomy. Although egg freezing has the potential to expand women's reproductive options and thus may represent a breakthrough for reproductive autonomy, I argue that without adequate information about likely outcomes and risks, women may be choosing to freeze their eggs in a commercially exploitative (...)
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  44. Lucie White (2013). Understanding the Relationship Between Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Response to Taylor. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):483-491.score: 84.0
    Medical ethicists conventionally assume that the requirement to employ informed consent procedures is grounded in autonomy. It seems intuitively plausible that providing information to an agent promotes his autonomy by better allowing him to steer his life. However, James Taylor questions this view, arguing that any notion of autonomy that grounds a requirement to inform agents turns out to be unrealistic and self-defeating. Taylor thus contends that we are mistaken about the real theoretical grounds for informed consent (...)
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  45. A. Dreyer, R. Forde & P. Nortvedt (2009). Autonomy at the End of Life: Life-Prolonging Treatment in Nursing Homes--Relatives' Role in the Decision-Making Process. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (11):672-677.score: 84.0
    Background: The increasing number of elderly people in nursing homes with failing competence to give consent represents a great challenge to healthcare staff’s protection of patient autonomy in the issues of life-prolonging treatment, hydration, nutrition and hospitalisation. The lack of national guidelines and internal routines can threaten the protection of patient autonomy. Objectives: To place focus on protecting patient autonomy in the decision-making process by studying how relatives experience their role as substitute decision-makers. Design: A qualitative descriptive (...)
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  46. Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O'Mathúna & P. Anne Scott (2012). Patient Autonomy and Choice in Healthcare: Self-Testing Devices as a Case in Point. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.score: 84.0
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that self-testing (...)
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  47. Vilhjálmur Árnason (2000). Gadamerian Dialogue in the Patient-Professional Interaction. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):17-23.score: 84.0
    In his seminal work, Truth and Method, theGerman philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer distinguishesbetween three types of what he calls the experience ofthe `Thou'. In this paper, Gadamer's analysis of thisexperience is explained in terms of his philosophicalhermeneutics and brought to bear upon thepatient-professional relationship. It is argued thatwhile Gadamer's analysis implies fruitful insights fora dialogical account of the patient-professionalinteraction, it harbours elements which are conduciveto paternalistic practice of medicine. The strongattribution of value to tradition and the respect forauthority emphasized in (...)
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  48. Helen L. Treanor (2000). Health Risks and the Health Care Professional. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (3):251-254.score: 80.0
    Health care professionals are one of a large group of individuals who are exposed to significant risks by virtue of their occupation, such as the police, mountain rescuers, fire-service. The types of risk to which health care professionals are exposed are numerous, many of which remain largely unrecognised by the public and may even be underestimated by the professionals themselves. Examples of these health risks include fatigue, emotional/psychological trauma, physical injury caused by the use of machinery, back injuries, possible even (...)
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  49. Thomas May (2002). Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 72.0
    Issues concerning patients' rights are at the center of bioethics, but the political basis for these rights has rarely been examined. In Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making , Thomas May offers a compelling analysis of how the political context of liberal constitutional democracy shapes the rights and obligations of both patients and health care professionals. May focuses on how a key feature of liberal society -- namely, an individual's right to make independent decisions (...)
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  50. Lionel Cauchard & Vilardell (2013). L'histoire face aux financements sur projet : autonomie professionnelle, temporalités et organisation de la recherche. Temporalités 18.score: 72.0
    Dans cet article, nous analysons comment et dans quelle mesure les changements dans les modalités d’allocation des financements publics génèrent des transformations dans les pratiques, les temporalités et l’organisation de la recherche en histoire. Face aux deux thèses qui s’affrontent autour de cette problématique, l’une soutenant l’hypothèse de la déprofessionnalisation et de la perte d’autonomie des chercheurs, et l’autre celle d’une recomposition de la profession académique, le travail d’enquête réalisé dans trois laboratoires d’histoire en France montre qu’il n’y a pas (...)
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