Search results for 'Professionalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Shaw (2009). Ethics, Professionalism and Fitness to Practice: Three Concepts, Not One. British Dental Journal 207 (2):59-62.score: 18.0
    The GDC’s recent third edition (interim) of The First Five Years places renewed emphasis on the place of professionalism in the undergraduate dental curriculum. This paper provides a brief analysis of the concepts of ethics, professionalism and fitness to practice, and an examination of the GDC’s First Five Years and Standards for Dental Professionals guidance, as well as providing an insight into the innovative ethics strand of the BDS course at the University of Glasgow. It emerges that GDC (...)
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  2. Roger Wertheimer (2010). The Moral Singularity of Military Professionalism. In , Empowering Our Military Conscience.score: 18.0
    Neither M. Walzer's collectivist conception of the "moral equality" of combatants, nor its antithetical individualist conceptions of responsibility are compatible with the ethos of military professionalism and its conception(s) of the responsibility of military professionals for service in an unjust war.
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  3. James A. Stieb (2011). Understanding Engineering Professionalism: A Reflection on the Rights of Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):149-169.score: 18.0
    Engineering societies such as the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) and associated entities have defined engineering and professionalism in such a way as to require the benefit of humanity (NSPE 2009a, Engineering Education Resource Document. NSPE Position Statements. Governmental Relations). This requirement has been an unnecessary and unfortunate add-on. The trend of the profession to favor the idea of requiring the benefit of humanity for professionalism violates an engineer’s rights. It applies political pressure that dissuades from inquiry, (...)
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  4. Baris Parkan (2008). Professionalism: A Virtue or Estrangement From Self-Activity? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):77 - 85.score: 18.0
    This paper attempts to clarify the meaning of the term ‚professional’ in its current use in our daily lives, mainly by making use of Weber’s discussion of the Protestant work ethic and rationalization. Identifying professionalism primarily as a particular lifestyle, it questions whether professionalism is a virtue to be encouraged or an alienated way of life. Rather than conclusively answering this question in the affirmative or negative, it contends that professionalism is an evolving concept, and endeavors to (...)
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  5. Linda Evans (2008). Professionalism, Professionality and the Development of Education Professionals. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (1):20 - 38.score: 18.0
    What purpose is served by renovation or redesign of professionalism, and how successful a process is it likely to be? This article addresses these questions by examining the effectiveness as a professional development mechanism of the imposition of changes to policy and/or practice that require modification or renovation of professionalism. The 'new' professionalisms purported to have been fashioned over the last two or three decades across the spectrum of UK education sectors and contexts have been the subject of (...)
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  6. Jan C. Heller (2012). Medical Professionalism, Revenue Enhancement, and Self-Interest: An Ethically Ambiguous Association. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):307-315.score: 18.0
    This article explores the association between medical professionalism, revenue enhancement, and self-interest. Utilizing the sociological literature, I begin by characterizing professionalism generally and medical professionalism particularly. I then consider “pay for performance” mechanisms as an example of one way physicians might be incentivized to improve their professionalism and, at the same time, enhance their revenue. I suggest that the concern discussed in much of the medical professionalism literature that physicians might act on the basis of (...)
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  7. Susan D. McCammon & Howard Brody (2012). How Virtue Ethics Informs Medical Professionalism. HEC Forum 24 (4):257-272.score: 18.0
    We argue that a turn toward virtue ethics as a way of understanding medical professionalism represents both a valuable corrective and a missed opportunity. We look at three ways in which a closer appeal to virtue ethics could help address current problems or issues in professionalism education—first, balancing professionalism training with demands for professional virtues as a prerequisite; second, preventing demands for the demonstrable achievement of competencies from working against ideal professionalism education as lifelong learning; and (...)
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  8. John Beck (2008). Governmental Professionalism: Re-Professionalising or De-Professionalising Teachers in England? British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (2):119 - 143.score: 18.0
    This paper draws on recent work by John Clarke and Janet Newman and their colleagues to analyse a relatively coherent governmental project, spanning the decades of Conservative and New Labour government in England since 1979, that has sought to render teachers increasingly subservient to the state and agencies of the state. Under New Labour this has involved discourse and policies aimed at transforming teaching into a 'modernised profession'. It is suggested that this appropriation of both the concept and substance of (...)
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  9. Jason E. Glenn (2012). The Eroding Principle of Justice in Teaching Medical Professionalism. HEC Forum 24 (4):293-305.score: 18.0
    This article examines the difficulties encountered in teaching professionalism to medical students in the current social and political climate where economic considerations take top priority in health care decision making. The conflict between the commitment to advocate at all times the interests of one’s patients over one’s own interests is discussed. With personal, institutional, tech industry, pharmaceutical industry, and third-party payer financial imperatives that stand between patients and the delivery of health care, this article investigates how medical ethics instructors (...)
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  10. Michael H. Malloy (2012). The Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas Medical Branch: A Medical Professionalism Translational Tool. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):273-278.score: 18.0
    This essay reviews some of the issues associated with the challenge of integrating the concepts of medical professionalism into the socialization and identity formation of the undergraduate medical student. A narrative-based approach to the integration of professionalism in medical education proposed by Coulehan (Acad Med 80(10):892–898, 2005) offers an appealing method to accomplish the task in a less didactic format and in a way that promotes more personal growth. In this essay, I review how the Osler Student Societies (...)
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  11. Jon Nixon (2001). 'Not Without Dust and Heat': The Moral Bases of the 'New' Academic Professionalism. British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (2):173 - 186.score: 18.0
    This paper challenges the view that academic professionalism resides in the professional 'autonomy ' of the academic, the 'self-regulation' of academics as an occupational group, and the differential 'status' of academic workers. This still influential (though residual) notion of academic professionalism, it is argued, leads to institutional stasis. What is required is greater reflexivity by academics in respect of their underlying professional values. In particular the piece challenges the academic community (of which the author is a member) to (...)
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  12. Emily Bell (forthcoming). A Room with a View of Integrity and Professionalism: Personal Reflections on Teaching Responsible Conduct of Research in the Neurosciences. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-9.score: 18.0
    Neuroscientists are increasingly put into situations which demand critical reflection about the ethical and appropriate use of research tools and scientific knowledge. Students or trainees also have to know how to navigate the ethical domains of this context. At a time when neuroscience is expected to advance policy and practice outcomes, in the face of academic pressures and complex environments, the importance of scientific integrity comes into focus and with it the need for training at the graduate level in the (...)
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  13. Ellen M. Harshman, James F. Gilsinan, James E. Fisher & Frederick C. Yeager (2005). Professional Ethics in a Virtual World: The Impact of the Internet on Traditional Notions of Professionalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):227 - 236.score: 15.0
    Numerous articles in the popular press together with an examination of websites associated with the medical, legal, engineering, financial, and other professions leave no doubt that the role of professions has been impacted by the Internet. While offering the promise of the democratization of expertise – expertise made available to the public at convenient times and locations and at an affordable cost – the Internet is also driving a reexamination of the concept of professional identity and related claims of expertise (...)
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  14. Eric Brown (2013). Vulnerability and the Basis of Business Ethics: From Fiduciary Duties to Professionalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):489-504.score: 15.0
    This paper examines the role of vulnerability in the basis of business ethics by criticizing its role in giving a moral substantial character to fiduciary duties to shareholders. The target is Marcoux’s (Bus Ethics Q 13(1):1–24, 2003) argument for morally substantial fiduciary duties vis-à-vis the multifiduciary stakeholder theory. Rather than proceed to support the stakeholder paradigm, a conception of vulnerability is combined with Heath’s 2004) “market failure” view of the ethical obligations of managers as falling out of their roles as (...)
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  15. Paul Gibbs (2010). A Heideggerian Phenomenology Approach to Higher Education as Workplace: A Consideration of Academic Professionalism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (3):275-285.score: 15.0
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  16. Jocelyn Lim Chua (2013). “Reaching Out to the People”: The Cultural Production of Mental Health Professionalism in the South Indian Public Sphere. Ethos 41 (4):341-359.score: 15.0
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  17. Miettinen Md Mph Msc Phd Md‐phD & Flegel Md Msc Frcp (2003). Professionalism in Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (3):353-356.score: 15.0
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  18. Ronald Harrison Fishbein (2000). Professionalism and 'the Master Clinician'– an Early Learning Experience. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (3):241-243.score: 15.0
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  19. Michael D. Kirk‐Smith & David D. Stretch (2003). The Influence of Medical Professionalism on Scientific Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (4):417-422.score: 15.0
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  20. Barrett T. Kitch, Catherine DesRoches, Cara Lesser, Amy Cunningham & Eric G. Campbell (2013). Systems Model of Physician Professionalism in Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):1-10.score: 15.0
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  21. Olli S. Miettinen & Kenneth M. Flegel (2003). Elementary Concepts of Medicine: X. Being a Good Doctor: Professionalism. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (3):341-343.score: 15.0
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  22. Tom Tomlinson, Judith Andre & Len Fleck (2003). Ethics, Professionalism, and Humanities at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Academic Medicine 78 (10).score: 15.0
     
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  23. David Carr (2000). Professionalism and Ethics in Teaching. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Professionalism and Ethics in Teaching examines the ethical issues of teaching. After discussing the moral implications of professionalism, David Carr explores the relationship of education theory to teaching practice and the impact of this relationship on professional expertise. He then identifies and examines some central ethical and moral issues in education and teaching. Finally he gives a detailed analysis of a range of issues concerning the role of the teacher and the management of educational issues. Professionalism and (...)
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  24. Mary Ann Reynolds (2000). Professionalism, Ethical Codes and the Internal Auditor: A Moral Argument. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (2):115 - 124.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the case of the internal auditor from a sociological and ethical perspective. Is it appropriate to extend the designation of professional to internal auditors? The discussion includes criteria from the sociology literature on professionalism. Further, professional ethical codes are compared. Internal auditors' code of ethics is found to have a strong moral approach, contrasting to the more instrumental approach of certified professional accountants. Internal auditors are noted as using their code of ethics to help resolve professional (...)
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  25. Marianne Allison (1986). A Literature Review of Approaches to the Professionalism of Journalists. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (2):5 – 19.score: 12.0
    This literature review of professionalism was prepared by San Jose State University graduate student Marianne Allison as a research committee project of the Mass Communication and Society Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The project was prepared under the guidance of Professor Diana Stover Tillinghast. It reviews the literature on two approaches to professionalism in general and of the professionalism of journalists in particular: the ?structural?functionalist approach?; and the ?power approach.?; Traditional and recent discussions (...)
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  26. Bala A. Musa & Jerry Komia Domatob (2007). Who is a Development Journalist? Perspectives on Media Ethics and Professionalism in Post-Colonial Societies. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (4):315 – 331.score: 12.0
    Journalistic practice and professionalism across the globe are characterized by certain universals as well as unique particularities. In most post-colonial societies, the ethical philosophies and professional ethos of journalists reflect the tension between the commitment to integrity and social responsibility, shared by journalists worldwide, and the contextual interpretation and application of these principles. This article examines the ethics and ethos of development journalism as a philosophically, culturally, and historically evolving professional ideology. It surveys the ethical landscape of development journalists (...)
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  27. Thomas E. Schaefer (1984). Professionalism: Foundation for Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 3 (4):269 - 277.score: 12.0
    Professionalism includes the essential contents of other key notions within the field of business ethics. As a term involving the notion of vocation it may be understood as containing a religious content, since vocation refers to a man's most intimate personal decisions, destiny and providence. Professionalism also connotes respect for law and so includes a reference to commercial law as a guide to right conduct. Professionalsim thus lifts the requirements of law to the level of personal commitment.Like an (...)
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  28. Delese Wear & Mark G. Kuczewski (2004). The Professionalism Movement: Can We Pause? American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):1 – 10.score: 12.0
    The topic of developing professionalism dominated the content of many academic medicine publications and conference agendas during the past decade. Calls to address the development of professionalism among medical students and residents have come from professional societies, accrediting agencies, and a host of educators in the biomedical sciences. The language of the professionalism movement is now a given among those in academic medicine. We raise serious concerns about the professionalism discourse and how the specialized language of (...)
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  29. Louis W. Hodges (1986). The Journalist and Professionalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (2):32 – 36.score: 12.0
    This essay by the director of Washington & Lee University's applied ethics program for Society and the Professions argues that journalists must begin taking themselves seriously as members of a profession if journalism is to gain the respect it needs to function effectively in society. Journalism, argues the author, may not possess all the classical attributes of professionalism, but it does possess the most important ones. The essay maintains that professionalism in journalism is important for the welfare of (...)
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  30. Lynette Reid (2011). Medical Professionalism and the Social Contract. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):455-469.score: 12.0
    The professionalism movement has animated medical education and practice; an extensive literature expresses and categorizes many interpretations of the concept (Hafferty 2006a; Hafferty and Levinson 2008). The inception of the current wave of the movement was in the American Board of Internal Medicine's Project Professionalism. In the face of threats from the growth of managed care and public concerns about conflict of interest, the ABIM's "Physician Charter" called for the profession to publically commit to values of patient welfare, (...)
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  31. M. J. Czarny, R. R. Faden & J. Sugarman (2010). Bioethics and Professionalism in Popular Television Medical Dramas. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):203-206.score: 12.0
    Television medical dramas sometimes depict medical professionalism and bioethical issues, but their nature and extent are unclear. The authors systematically analysed the bioethical and professionalism content of one season each of Grey's Anatomy and House M.D., two of the most popular current television medical dramas. The results indicate that these programmes are rife with powerful portrayals of bioethical issues and egregious deviations from the norms of professionalism and contain exemplary depictions of professionalism to a much lesser (...)
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  32. Delese Wear & Julie M. Aultman (eds.) (2006). Professionalism in Medicine: Critical Perspectives. Springer.score: 12.0
    The topic of professionalism has dominated the content of major academic medicine publications (e.g. Journal of the American Medical Association, New England Journal of Medicine, Academic Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, The Lancet) during the past decade and continues to do so. The message of this current wave of professionalism is that medical educators need to be more attentive to the moral sensibilities of trainees, to their interpersonal and affective dimensions, and to their social conscience, all to the (...)
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  33. Y. M. Barilan (2009). Responsibility as a Meta-Virtue: Truth-Telling, Deliberation and Wisdom in Medical Professionalism. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):153-158.score: 12.0
    The article examines the new discourse on medical professionalism and responsibility through the prism of conflicts among moral values, especially with regard to truth-telling. The discussion is anchored in the renaissance of English-language writing on medical ethics in the 18th century, which paralleled the rise of humanitarianism and the advent of the word “responsibility”. Following an analysis of the meanings of the value of responsibility in general and in medical practice in particular, it is argued that, similarly to the (...)
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  34. Susan Dorr Goold & David T. Stern (2006). Ethics and Professionalism: What Does a Resident Need to Learn? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):9 – 17.score: 12.0
    Training in ethics and professionalism is a fundamental component of residency education, yet there is little empirical information to guide curricula. The objective of this study is to describe empirically derived ethics objectives for ethics and professionalism training for multiple specialties. Study design is a thematic analysis of documents, semi-structured interviews, and focus groups conducted in a setting of an academic medical center, Veterans Administration, and community hospital training more than 1000 residents. Participants were 84 informants in 13 (...)
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  35. Marietta Peytcheva & Danielle E. Warren (2011). Auditor Professionalism. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (1-2):33-57.score: 12.0
    The effectiveness of professional sanctions against violations rests upon the severity of sanctions and detection of violations. Here we examine perceptions of professional violation detection in auditing where the professional standards may conflict with the interests of the auditor’s firm. Using a sample of future and experienced auditors, we test the relationship between professional violations and auditors’ perceptions of the likelihood that severely-sanctioned violations will be discovered (a) by the audit profession, and (b) by the auditor’s firm. In our study, (...)
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  36. A. Rosin (2009). George Eliot's Middlemarch: A Contribution to Medical Professionalism. Medical Humanities 35 (1):43-46.score: 12.0
    The qualities of medical professionalism have been questioned in the last few years. George Eliot’s 19th century novel Middlemarch illustrates some of the truths that should underlie the physician-patient relationship, and depicts prophetically some of the developments that were to occur in reality in the medicine of the 20th and 21st century. Her insight into the problems facing a medical researcher and the fictional conflicts between vocation and marriage are real issues of medical professionalism even today.
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  37. Karen Ritchie (1988). Professionalism, Altruism, and Overwork. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (4):447-455.score: 12.0
    The author contends that overworking residents cannot be ethically justified. There is evidence that overwork is detrimental both to the resident and to the patient. In addition, thu argument that working long hours is essential to maintain medicine's status as a profession is analyzed. The claim cannot be supported by definitions of professionalism. Although Flexner's definition does specify altruism as an essential component, it does not justify long working hours for residents. Altruism is obligatory in some limited cases, but (...)
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  38. Thomas S. Huddle (2013). The Limits of Social Justice as an Aspect of Medical Professionalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):369-387.score: 12.0
    Contemporary accounts of medical ethics and professionalism emphasize the importance of social justice as an ideal for physicians. This ideal is often specified as a commitment to attaining the universal availability of some level of health care, if not of other elements of a “decent minimum” standard of living. I observe that physicians, in general, have not accepted the importance of social justice for professional ethics, and I further argue that social justice does not belong among professional norms. Social (...)
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  39. E. C. Hui (2010). The Contemporary Healthcare Crisis in China and the Role of Medical Professionalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (4):477-492.score: 12.0
    The healthcare crisis that has developed in the last two decades during China's economic reform has caused healthcare and hospital financing reforms to be largely experienced by patients as a crisis in the patient–healthcare professional relationship (PPR) at the bedside. The nature and magnitude of this crisis were epitomized by the "Harbin Scandal"—an incident that took place in August 2005 in a Harbin teaching hospital in which the family of an elderly patient hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) for (...)
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  40. D. Carr (1981). Professionalism in Education and Physical Education: A Reply to David Best. British Journal of Educational Studies 29 (2):152 - 158.score: 12.0
    (1981). Professionalism in education and physical education: A reply to David best. British Journal of Educational Studies: Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 152-158.
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  41. Edmund L. Erde (2000). On Values, Professionalism and Nosology: An Essay with Late Commentary on Essays by DeVito and Rudnick. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (5):581 – 603.score: 12.0
    The essays by Scott DeVito and Abraham Rudnick are on largely the same topics - the meanings of health(y), normal, disease, pathological, diagnosis , etc., and they contain compatible conclusions - that medical precepts are value-laden and less objective than some na?ve model of scientific objectivity would suggest. This commentary opens with a brief critique of each and ends with a more in-depth account, one complaint being how lacking in weight the analyses are. In the middle portion of this commentary, (...)
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  42. Frederic W. Hafferty & Dana Levinson (2008). Moving Beyond Nostalgia and Motives: Towards a Complexity Science View of Medical Professionalism. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):599-615.score: 12.0
    Modern-day discourse on medical professionalism has largely been dominated by a "nostalgic" view, emphasizing individual motives and behaviors. Shaped by a defining conflict between commercialism and professionalism, this discourse has unfolded through a series of waves, the first four of which are discovery, definition, assessment, and institutionalization. They have unfolded in a series of highly interactive and overlapping sequences that extend into the present. The fifth wave-linking structure and agency-which is nascent, proposes to shift our focus on (...) from changing individuals to modifying the underlying structural and environmental forces that shape social actors and actions. The sixth wave-complexity science-is more incubatory in nature and seeks to recast social actors, social structures, and environmental factors as interactive, adaptive, and interdependent. Moving towards such a framing is necessary if medicine is to effectively reestablish professionalism as a core principle. (shrink)
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  43. Vivien Holmes, Tony Foley, Stephen Tang & Margie Rowe (2012). Practising Professionalism: Observations From an Empirical Study of New Australian Lawyers. Legal Ethics 15 (1):29-55.score: 12.0
    Many suggest that professionalism as traditionally understood is all but dead in today's legal marketplace. Some scholars believe that 'professional' orientations based on managerialism and influenced by profitability have seen the demise of the lawyer's traditional professional identity. This paper argues otherwise. A pilot qualitative study of new Australian lawyers indicates that professional ideals can still flourish. Participants both understood the traditional ideals and sought to incorporate them in their own developing sense of professionalism. This paper reviews the (...)
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  44. Friedrich Baerwald (1970). Problems of Professionalism. Thought 45 (3):371-390.score: 12.0
    The crisis of the contemporary world is also a crisis of professionalism, the inevitable growth of which has created new problems both international and domestic.
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  45. Kerry J. Breen (ed.) (2010). Good Medical Practice: Professionalism, Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Written by specialist practitioners with vast teaching experience, this is a unique, timely and accessible text that reinforces a contemporary focus on professionalism in medical practice.
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  46. E. L. Erde (2008). Professionalism's Facets: Ambiguity, Ambivalence, and Nostalgia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):6-26.score: 12.0
    Medical educators invoke professionalism as a core competency in curricula. This paper criticizes classic definitions. It also identifies some negative traits of medicine as a profession. The call to professionalism is naive nostalgia. Straightforward didactics in professionalism cannot do the desired work in medical education. The most we can say is that students should adopt the good aspects of professionalism and the profession should stop being some of what it has been. This is a platitude. If (...)
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  47. Todd S. Hawley, A. Robert Pifel & Adam W. Jordan (2012). Structure, Citizenship, and Professionalism. Journal of Social Studies Research 36 (3):245-262.score: 12.0
    This article details an interpretive, qualitative interview study that explored rationales developed by seven social studies graduate students, all experiencedteachers, at a large Midwestern university. Interviews revealed three common themes regarding the influence of the rationale development process. The threethemes were: providing structure, connecting purpose and practice, and improving professionalism. The themes demonstrate the complex nature of articulating a sense of purpose, even for experienced teachers. While similar, there were considerable differences in the ways the participants conceptualized their purposes. (...)
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  48. Simon Bradford (2007). The 'Good Youth Leader': Constructions of Professionalism in English Youth Work, 1939-45. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):293-309.score: 12.0
    This article explores the development of professional training for youth leaders (now, youth workers) in England and Wales between 1939 and 1945. The article identifies the state's construction of young people as a problematic social category at a time of national crisis and its mobilization of youth leadership as part of the war effort. The Board of Education supported, sometimes tacitly, the development of courses in some universities and voluntary organizations for youth leaders. By 1942 full-time courses of training existed (...)
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  49. Mary M. Cronin (1993). Trade Press Roles in Promoting Journalistic Professionalism, 1884-1917. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (4):227 – 238.score: 12.0
    Journalism's trade magazines were established just as press members began debating the value of professionalism. These magazines had the potential to become important voices in the professionalizing debate because of their national distribution. This study reveals that although journalists remained divided over the value of professionalism, they valued Editor & Publisher more than The Journalist because Editor & Publisher took a leadership role on the professionalism debate, defining professionalism and explaining what standards and group norms were (...)
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  50. Loretta M. Kopelman (1999). Help From Hume Reconciling Professionalism and Managed Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):396 – 410.score: 12.0
    Health care systems are widely criticized for limiting doctors' roles as patient-advocates. Yet unrestricted advocacy can be unfairly partial, costly, and prejudicial. This essay considers three solutions to the problem of how to reconcile the demands of a just health care system for all patients, with the value of advocacy for some. Two views are considered and rejected, one supporting unlimited advocacy and another defending strict impartiality. A third view suggested by Hume's moral theory seeks to square the moral demands (...)
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