Search results for 'Professor Adam Morton' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Adam Morton (2002). Emotional Truth: Emotional Accuracy: Adam Morton. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):265–275.score: 1640.0
  2. Professor Adam Morton (2004). Epistemic Virtues, Metavirtues, and Computational Complexity. Noûs 38 (3):481-502.score: 870.0
    I argue that considerations about computational complexity show that all finite agents need characteristics like those that have been called epistemic virtues. The necessity of these virtues follows in part from the nonexistence of shortcuts, or efficient ways of finding shortcuts, to cognitively expensive routines. It follows that agents must possess the capacities – metavirtues –of developing in advance the cognitive virtues they will need when time and memory are at a premium.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Charles Morton (1995). Aristotelian and Cartesian Logic at Harvard: Charles Morton's a Logick System & William Brattle's Compendium of Logick. Published by the Colonial Society of Massachusetts and Distributed by the University Press of Virginia.score: 600.0
    Machine generated contents note: ARISTOTELIAN AND CARTESIAN LOGIC AT HARVARD -- by Rick Kennedy -- I. Introduction --II. Religiously-Oriented, Dogmatically-Inclined Humanistic Logics from the Renaissance to the Seventeenth Century -- A. Melanchthon and Aristotelianism 01 -- B. Richardson and Ramism 16 -- C. Aristotelianism, Ramism, and Schematic Thinking 25 -- D. Puritan Favoritism From Ramus to Descartes 32 -- E. Cartesian Logic and Christian Skepticism 37 -- F. The Religious and Dogmatic Orientation of The Port-'Royalfogic 42 -- G. Cartesian Logic (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Adam Morton (2004). On Evil. Routledge.score: 520.0
    Evil has long fascinated psychologists, philosophers, novelists and playwrights but remains an incredibly difficult concept to talk about. On Evil is a compelling and at times disturbing tour of the many faces of evil. What is evil, and what makes people do awful things? If we can explain evil, do we explain it away? Can we imagine the mind of a serial killer, or does such evil defy description? Does evil depend on a contrast with good, as religion tells us, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Broome & Adam Morton (1994). The Value of a Person. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 68:167 - 198.score: 520.0
    (for Adam Morton's half) I argue that if we take the values of persons to be ordered in a way that allows incomparability, then the problems Broome raises have easy solutions. In particular we can maintain that creating people is morally neutral while killing them has a negative value.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Adam Morton (2012). Bounded Thinking: Intellectual Virtues for Limited Agents. Oup Oxford.score: 520.0
    Adam Morton offers a new account of the virtues of limitation management: intellectual virtues of adapting to the fact that we cannot solve many of the problems that we can describe. He argues that the best response to many problems depends not on the most rationally promising solution, but on the most likely route to success.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Adam Morton (2002). Emotional Truth: Emotional Accuracy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (76):265-275.score: 520.0
    [Ronald de Sousa] Taking literally the concept of emotional truth requires breaking the monopoly on truth of belief-like states. To this end, I look to perceptions for a model of non-propositional states that might be true or false, and to desires for a model of propositional attitudes the norm of which is other than the semantic satisfaction of their propositional object. Those models inspire a conception of generic truth, which can admit of degrees for analogue representations such as emotions; belief-like (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ronald De Sousa & Adam Morton (2002). Emotional Truth. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76:247 - 275.score: 480.0
    [Ronald de Sousa] Taking literally the concept of emotional truth requires breaking the monopoly on truth of belief-like states. To this end, I look to perceptions for a model of non-propositional states that might be true or false, and to desires for a model of propositional attitudes the norm of which is other than the semantic satisfaction of their propositional object. Those models inspire a conception of generic truth, which can admit of degrees for analogue representations such as emotions; belief-like (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Adam Morton (2012). Contrastive Knowledge. In Martijn Blaauw (ed.), Contrastivism in Philosophy: New Perspectives. Routledge. 74-89.score: 300.0
    The claim of this paper is that the everyday functions of knowledge make most sense if we see knowledge as contrastive. That is, we can best understand how the concept does what it does by thinking in terms of a relation “a knows that p rather than q.” There is always a contrast with an alternative. Contrastive interpretations of knowledge, and objections to them, have become fairly common in recent philosophy. The version defended here is fairly mild in that there (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Morton Adam (1997). Explaining Culture. Philosophical Books 38 (4).score: 280.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Adam Morton (2004). Indicative Versus Subjunctive in Future Conditionals. Analysis 64 (4):289–293.score: 260.0
    I present examples of future tense Adams pairs, pairs of conditionals relating the same antecedents and consequents which differ in truth value because one is an indicative conditional and one a subjunctive (counterfactual) conditional. This contradicts claims of Jonathan Bennett and others. I argue that the pairs do differ in that one is indicative and the other subjunctive, by appealing to several ways of marking this distinction.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Fabrizio Mondadori & Adam Morton (1976). Modal Realism: The Poisoned Pawn. Philosophical Review 85 (1):3-20.score: 240.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Adam Morton, Accomplishment.score: 240.0
    The concepts of knowledge and of accomplishment have many similarities. In fact they are duals, in a sense that I explain. Similar issues arise about both of them, deriving from the functions they serve in everyday evaluation of inquiry and action.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Adam Morton (1996). Folk Psychology is Not a Predictive Device. Mind 105 (417):119-37.score: 240.0
  15. Adam Morton (1973). If I Were a Dry Well-Made Match. Dialogue 12 (02):322-324.score: 240.0
    I discuss Goodman's claim that when 'all As are Bs' is a law then the counterfactual 'if a were an A, it would be a B' is tue. I give counterexamples, and link the failure of the connection to the contrast between higher level and lower level laws.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Antti Karjalainen & Adam Morton (2003). Contrastive Knowledge. Philosophical Explorations 6 (2):74 – 89.score: 240.0
    We describe the three place relation of contrastive knowledge, which holds between a person, a target proposition, and a contrasting proposition. The person knows that p rather than that q. We argue for three claims about this relation. (a) Many common sense and philosophical ascriptions of knowledge can be understood in terms of it. (b) Its application is subject to fewer complications than non-contrastive knowledge is. (c) It applies over a wide range of human and nonhuman cases.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Adam Morton (2010). Human Bounds: Rationality for Our Species. Synthese 176 (1):5 - 21.score: 240.0
    Is there such a thing as bounded rationality? I first try to make sense of the question, and then to suggest which of the disambiguated versions might have answers. We need an account of bounded rationality that takes account of detailed contingent facts about the ways in which human beings fail to perform as we might ideally want to. But we should not think in terms of rules or norms which define good responses to an individual's limitations, but rather in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Adam Morton (2000). Saving Epistemology From the Epistemologists: Recent Work in the Theory of Knowledge. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):685-704.score: 240.0
    This is a very selective survey of developments in epistemology, concentrating on work from the past twenty years that is of interest to philosophers of science. The selection is organized around interesting connections between distinct themes. I first connect issues about skepticism to issues about the reliability of belief-acquiring processes. Next I connect discussions of the defeasibility of reasons for belief to accounts of the theory-independence of evidence. Then I connect doubts about Bayesian epistemology to issues about the content of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Adam Morton (2008). The Roots of Evil. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):495–496.score: 240.0
    a review of John Kekes' *The Roots of Evil*. I express admiration for the aims and scope of the book, and disagree with some of Kekes' accounts of some historical cases.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Adam Morton (2012). Accomplishing Accomplishment. Acta Analytica 27 (1):1-8.score: 240.0
    The concepts of knowledge and accomplishment are duals. There are many parallels between them. In this paper I discuss the "AA" thesis, which is dual to the well known KK thesis. The KK thesis claims that if someone knows something, then she knows that she knows it. This is generally thought to be false, and there are powerful reasons for rejecting it. The AA thesis claims that if someone accomplishes something, then she accomplishes that she accomplishes it. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Adam Morton, Searching for Logic.score: 240.0
    This is the PRINT VERSION of the text. There is also an e-version available on the web-site and the moodle site for the course. It has colours and more pictures. You do not have to buy this print version, if you prefer to read the e-version on screen, or print for yourself from the print version files also available on the web. But you do need to have one version or the other. Some may prefer to have both. When I (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Adam Morton (2003). A Guide Through the Theory of Knowledge. Blackwell Pub..score: 240.0
    The third edition of this highly acclaimed text is ideal for introductory courses in epistemology.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Adam Morton (2010). Feelings of Being: Phenomenology, Psychiatry and the Sense of Reality – Matthew Ratcliffe. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):661-662.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Adam Morton, Three Moral Hints.score: 240.0
    A vegetarian argument: We should avoid meat not because we think that animals are like us but because most animals are very different from humans. Most animals are not persons: they think and feel but do not have thoughts and feelings about their thoughts and feelings. With persons the obligation to prevent suffering, and indeed the obligation to preserve life, can be over-ridden by mutual agreement. I'll risk my life and welfare to protect your children if you do the same (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Adam Morton (2010). Central and Marginal Forgiveness: Comments on Charles Griswold's Forgiveness; a Philosophical Exploration. Philosophia 38 (3):439-444.score: 240.0
    I discuss Charles Griswold’s Forgiveness, arguing that he classifies as marginal many cases that we normally count as forgiveness. Moreover the phenomenon that he calls “forgiveness at its best” may include some awful aspects of human nature. Nevertheless, there are central and important aspects of the concept that are captured by his discussion.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Adam Morton (1975). Complex Individuals and Multigrade Relations. Noûs 9 (3):309-318.score: 240.0
    I relate plural quantification, and predicate logic where predicates do not need a fixed number of argument places, to the part-whole relation. For more on these themes see later work by Boolos, Lewis, and Oliver & Smiley.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Adam Morton (2004). Philosophy in Practice: An Introduction to the Main Questions. Blackwell Pub..score: 240.0
    Certainty and doubt -- Sources of conviction -- Rationalism -- Rationalism versus relativism in morals -- Induction and deduction -- The retreat from certainty -- Utilitarianism -- Kantian ethics -- Empiricism -- Beyond empiricism -- Objectivity -- Materialism and dualism -- Morality for naturalists -- Deep illusions -- Realism.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Adam Morton (1975). Because He Thought He Had Insulted Him. Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):5-15.score: 240.0
    I compare our idioms for quantifying into belief contexts to our idioms for quantifying into intention contexts. The latter is complicated by the fact that there is always a discrepancy between the action as intended and the action as performed. The article contains - this is written long after it appeared - an early version of a tracking or sensitivity analysis of the relation between a thought and its object.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Adam Morton (2010). Epistemic Emotions. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 385--399.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Adam Morton (2006). The Future for Philosophy - Edited by Brian Leiter. Philosophical Books 47 (4):366-368.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Adam Morton (1973). Denying the Doctrine and Changing the Subject. Journal of Philosophy 70 (15):503-510.score: 240.0
    I discuss Quine's claim that anyone denying what we now take to be a logical truth would be using logical words in a novel way. I trace this to a confusions between outright denial and failure to assert, and assertion of a negation. (This abstract is written from memory decades after the article.).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Adam Morton (2006). Moral Incompetence. In T. . D. . J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Moral high-performers have characteristic faults. I describe difficulties in handling moral problems that arise not out of faulty intentions or defective values but because the agents underestimate the complexity of the situation.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Adam Morton (forthcoming). Shared Knowledge From Individual Vice: The Role of Unworthy Epistemic Emotions. Philosophical Inquiries.score: 240.0
    This paper begins with a discussion the role of less-than-admirable epistemic emotions in our respectable, indeed admirable inquiries: nosiness, obsessiveness, wishful thinking, denial, partisanship. The explanation for their desirable effect is Mandevillian: because of the division of epistemic labour individual epistemic vices can lead to shared knowledge. In fact it is sometimes essential to it.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Adam Morton (2003). The Importance of Being Understood: Folk Psychology As Ethics. New York: Routledge.score: 240.0
    The Importance of Being Understood argues for an alternative to traditional accounts in contemporary philosophy of the power of folk psychology to explain our...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Adam Morton (2006). But Are They Right? The Prospects for Empirical Conceptology. Journal of Cognition and Culture 6.score: 240.0
    This is exciting stuff. Philosophers have long explored the structure of human concepts from the inside, by manipulating their skills as users of those concepts. And since Quine most reasonable philosophers have accepted that the structure is a contingent matter – we or not too different creatures could have thought differently – which in principle can be..
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Adam Morton & Antti Karjalainen (2008). Contrastivity and Indistinguishability. Social Epistemology 22 (3):271 – 280.score: 240.0
    We give a general description of a class of contrastive constructions, intended to capture what is common to contrastive knowledge, belief, hope, fear, understanding and other cases where one expresses a propositional attitude in terms of “rather than”. The crucial element is the agent's incapacity to distinguish some possibilities from others. Contrastivity requires a course-graining of the set of possible worlds. As a result, contrastivity will usually cut across logical consequence, so that an agent can have an attitude to p (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Adam Morton (1969). Extensional and Non-Truth-Functional Contexts. Journal of Philosophy 66 (6):159-164.score: 240.0
    I discuss Frege's argument - later called the slingshot - that if a construction is extensional and preserves logical equivalence then it is truth-functional. I consider some simple apparent counterexamples and conclude that they are not sentence-embedding in the required way.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Adam Morton (2009). Rediscovering Empathy: Agency, Folk Psychology, and the Human Sciences – Karsten R. Stueber. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):754-756.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Adam Morton (2004). Epistemic Virtues, Metavirtues, and Computational Complexity. Noûs 38 (3):481–502.score: 240.0
    I argue that considerations about computational complexity show that all finite agents need characteristics like those that have been called epistemic virtues. The necessity of these virtues follows in part from the nonexistence of shortcuts, or efficient ways of finding shortcuts, to cognitively expensive routines. It follows that agents must possess the capacities – metavirtues –of developing in advance the cognitive virtues they will need when time and memory are at a premium.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Adam Morton (2011). Conventional Norms of Reasoning. Dialogue 50 (02):247-260.score: 240.0
    I describe conventions not of correct reasoning but of giving and taking advice about reasoning. This article is asn anticipation of part of the first chapter of my forthcoming *Bounded Thinking*, OUP 2012.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Adam Morton (2014). Skookumchuck, Kiidk'yaas, Gibbard: Normativity, Meaning, and Idealization (Critical Notice of Allan Gibbard Meaning and Normativity). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):148-161.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Adam Morton (1985). The Variety of Rationality. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 139:139-162.score: 240.0
  43. Adam Morton (1990). Mathematical Modelling and Contrastive Explanation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (Supplement):251-270.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Adam Morton (1993). Mathematical Models: Questions of Trustworthiness. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (4):659-674.score: 240.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Adam Morton (1991). The Inevitability of Folk Psychology. In R. Bogdan (ed.), Mind and Common Sense. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
  46. Adam Morton (2002). If You’Re so Smart Why Are You Ignorant? Epistemic Causal Paradoxes. Analysis 62 (274):110–116.score: 240.0
    I present epistemic analogs to the tension between causal and evidential decision theory.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Adam Morton (2005). Review of Paul Weirich, Realistic Decision Theory: Rules for Nonideal Agents in Nonideal Circumstances. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (8).score: 240.0
  48. Adam Morton (2004). Against the Ramsey Test. Analysis 64 (4):294–299.score: 240.0
  49. Adam Morton (2000). Incommensurability, Incomparability, and Practical Reason, Ruth Chang (Ed.), Harvard University Press, 1998, 303 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):147-174.score: 240.0
1 — 50 / 999