Search results for 'Programming languages (Electronic computers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Roberto M. Amadio (1998). Domains and Lambda-Calculi. Cambridge University Press.
    This book describes the mathematical aspects of the semantics of programming languages. The main goals are to provide formal tools to assess the meaning of programming constructs in both a language-independent and a machine-independent way, and to prove properties about programs, such as whether they terminate, or whether their result is a solution of the problem they are supposed to solve. In order to achieve this the authors first present, in an elementary and unified way, the theory (...)
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  2. Veronica Dahl & Patrick Saint-Dizier (1985). Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming, Rennes, France, 18-20 September, 1984. [REVIEW] Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  3. C. Böhm (ed.) (1975). [Lambda]-Calculus and Computer Science Theory: Proceedings of the Symposium Held in Rome, March 25-27, 1975. Springer-Verlag.
     
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  4. Bruno Buchberger (1972). A Study on Universal Functions. Institut Für Numerische Mathematik Und Elektronische Informationsverarbeitung, Universität Innsbruck.
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  5.  9
    Yorick Wilks (1982). Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):191-195.
    When John von Neumann turned his interest to computers, he was one of the leading mathematicians of his time. In the 1940s, he helped design two of the first stored-program digital electronic computers. He authored reports explaining the functional organization of modern computers for the first time, thereby influencing their construction worldwide (von Neumann, 1945; Burks et al., 1946). In the first of these reports, von Neumann described the computer as analogous to a brain, with an input (...)
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