Search results for 'Progress' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.score: 24.0
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of (...)
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  2. Moti Mizrahi (2013). What is Scientific Progress? Lessons From Scientific Practice. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 44 (2):375-390.score: 24.0
    Alexander Bird argues for an epistemic account of scientific progress, whereas Darrell Rowbottom argues for a semantic account. Both appeal to intuitions about hypothetical cases in support of their accounts. Since the methodological significance of such appeals to intuition is unclear, I think that a new approach might be fruitful at this stage in the debate. So I propose to abandon appeals to intuition and look at scientific practice instead. I discuss two cases that illustrate the way in which (...)
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  3. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.score: 24.0
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly comments on (...)
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  4. Theo A. F. Kuipers (1999). Abduction Aiming at Empirical Progress or Eventruth Approximationleading to a Challenge for Computational Modelling. Foundations of Science 4 (3):307-323.score: 24.0
    This paper primarily deals with theconceptual prospects for generalizing the aim ofabduction from the standard one of explainingsurprising or anomalous observations to that ofempirical progress or even truth approximation. Itturns out that the main abduction task then becomesthe instrumentalist task of theory revision aiming atan empirically more successful theory, relative to theavailable data, but not necessarily compatible withthem. The rest, that is, genuine empirical progress aswell as observational, referential and theoreticaltruth approximation, is a matter of evaluation andselection, and (...)
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  5. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2006). Genetic Epistemology and Piaget's Philosophy of Science: Piaget Vs. Kuhn on Scientific Progress. Theory and Psychology 16 (2):203-224.score: 24.0
    This paper concerns Jean Piaget's (1896–1980) philosophy of science and, in particular, the picture of scientific development suggested by his theory of genetic epistemology. The aims of the paper are threefold: (1) to examine genetic epistemology as a theory concerning the growth of knowledge both in the individual and in science; (2) to explicate Piaget's view of ‘scientific progress’, which is grounded in his theory of equilibration; and (3) to juxtapose Piaget's notion of progress with Thomas Kuhn's (1922–1996). (...)
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  6. Moti Mizrahi & Wesley Buckwalter (2014). The Role of Justification in the Ordinary Concept of Scientific Progress. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 45 (1):151-166.score: 24.0
    Alexander Bird and Darrell Rowbottom have argued for two competing accounts of the concept of scientific progress. For Bird, progress consists in the accumulation of scientific knowledge. For Rowbottom, progress consists in the accumulation of true scientific beliefs. Both appeal to intuitions elicited by thought experiments in support of their views, and it seems fair to say that the debate has reached an impasse. In an attempt to avoid this stalemate, we conduct a systematic study of the (...)
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  7. Alexander Bird (2008). Scientific Progress as Accumulation of Knowledge: A Reply to Rowbottom. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (2):279-281.score: 24.0
    I defend my view that scientific progress is constituted by the accumulation of knowledge against a challenge from Rowbottom in favour of the semantic view that it is only truth that is relevant to progress.
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  8. Magdalena Balcerak Jackson (2013). Conceptual Analysis and Epistemic Progress. Synthese 190 (15):3053-3074.score: 24.0
    This essay concerns the question of how we make genuine epistemic progress through conceptual analysis. Our way into this issue will be through consideration of the paradox of analysis. The paradox challenges us to explain how a given statement can make a substantive contribution to our knowledge, even while it purports merely to make explicit what one’s grasp of the concept under scrutiny consists in. The paradox is often treated primarily as a semantic puzzle. However, in “Sect. 1” I (...)
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  9. Gregory Radick (2000). Two Explanations of Evolutionary Progress. Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):475-491.score: 24.0
    Natural selection explains how living forms are fitted to theirconditions of life. Darwin argued that selection also explains what hecalled the gradual advancement of the organisation, i.e.evolutionary progress. Present-day selectionists disagree. In theirview, it is happenstance that sustains conditions favorable to progress,and therefore happenstance, not selection, that explains progress. Iargue that the disagreement here turns not on whether there exists aselection-based condition bias – a belief now attributed to Darwin – but on whether there needs to be (...)
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  10. Bernd Rosslenbroich (2006). The Notion of Progress in Evolutionary Biology – the Unresolved Problem and an Empirical Suggestion. Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):41-70.score: 24.0
    Modern biology is ambivalent about the notion of evolutionary progress. Although most evolutionists imply in their writings that they still understand large-scale macroevolution as a somewhat progressive process, the use of the term “progress” is increasingly criticized and avoided. The paper shows that this ambivalence has a long history and results mainly from three problems: (1) The term “progress” carries historical, theoretical and social implications which are not congruent with modern knowledge of the course of evolution; (2) (...)
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  11. Vladimir V. Mironov (2013). On Progress in Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):10-14.score: 24.0
    This article seeks to clarify the concept of progress in philosophy. It treats progress as a kind of development. But not every development is a progress. When we talk about progress, what really matters is the direction of development. In some cases it is relatively easy to reach agreement about this direction. But not in the case of philosophy, if we abstract it from the obvious and the trivial, like the number of books on philosophy. As (...)
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  12. Yvonne Donders (2011). The Right to Enjoy the Benefits of Scientific Progress: In Search of State Obligations in Relation to Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):371-381.score: 24.0
    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights—the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications—has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)—be it at the very end of both instruments -this right hardly received any attention from States, UN bodies and programmes and academics. The role of science (...)
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  13. Joseph A. Petrick & John F. Quinn (2000). The Integrity Capacity Construct and Moral Progress in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (1):3 - 18.score: 24.0
    The authors propose the integrity capacity construct with its four dimensions (process, judgment, development and system dimensions) as a framework for analyzing and resolving behavioral, moral and legal complexity in business ethics' issues at the individual and collective levels. They claim that moral progress in business comes about through the increase in stakeholders who regularly handle moral complexity by demonstrating process, judgment, developmental and system integrity capacity domestically and globally.
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  14. William J. Rapaport (1982). Unsolvable Problems and Philosophical Progress. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (4):289 - 298.score: 24.0
    Philosophy has been characterized (e.g., by Benson Mates) as a field whose problems are unsolvable. This has often been taken to mean that there can be no progress in philosophy as there is in mathematics or science. The nature of problems and solutions is considered, and it is argued that solutions are always parts of theories, hence that acceptance of a solution requires commitment to a theory (as suggested by William Perry's scheme of cognitive development). Progress can be (...)
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  15. Philippe Verdoux (2009). Transhumanism, Progress and the Future. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20 (2):49-69.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that one can advocate a moral imperative to pursue enhancement technologies while at the same time rejecting the historical reality of progress and holding a pessimistic view of the future. The first half of the paper puts forth several arguments for why progress is illusory and why one has good reason to be pessimistic about the future of humanity (and posthumanity). The second half then argues that this is entirely consistent with also championing the futurological (...)
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  16. Oscar Nudler (2010). Is There Progress in Philosophy. Principia 5 (1-2):241-252.score: 24.0
    After referring to Bertrand Russell's view of philosophy as stated in his book The Problems of Philosophy, according to which the value of philosophy lies not in the achievement of any truth or certainty but in its capacity to "enlarge our thoughts", I address the issue of the nature of philosophical controversies. Based on a development and application of Russell's view, I criticize the prevailing assumption that the existence of protracted, unsettled controversies shows that there is no progress in (...)
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  17. Ignaas Devisch (2011). Progress in Medicine: Autonomy, Oughtonomy and Nudging. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):857-861.score: 24.0
    Rationale: In this article, I argue that we need a new perspective in the debate on autonomy in medicine, to understand many of the problems we face today – dilemmas that are situated at the intersection of autonomy and heteronomy, such as why well informed and autonomous people make unhealthy lifestyle choices. If people do not choose what they want, this is not simply caused by their lack of character or capability, but also by the fact that absolute autonomy is (...)
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  18. Leen De Vreese (2011). Evidence-Based Medicine and Progress in the Medical Sciences. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):852-856.score: 24.0
    The question what scientific progress means for a particular domain such as medicine seems importantly different from the question what scientific progress is in general. While the latter question received ample treatment in the philosophical literature, the former question is hardly discussed. I argue that it is nonetheless important to think about this question in view of the methodological choices we make. I raise specific questions that should be tackled regarding scientific progress in the medical sciences and (...)
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  19. Maarten Doorman (2003). Art in Progress: A Philosophical Response to the End of the Avant-Garde. Amsterdam University Press.score: 24.0
    In this challenging essay, Maarten Doorman argues that in art, belief in progress is still relevant, if not essential. The radical freedoms of postmodernism, he claims, have had a crippling effect on art, leaving it in danger of becoming meaningless. Art can only acquire meaning through context the concept of progress, then, is ideal as the primary criterion for establishing that context. The history of art, in fact, can be seen as a process of constant accumulation, works of (...)
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  20. Andrzej Elżanowski (2013). Moral Progress: A Present-Day Perspective on the Leading Enlightenment Idea. ARGUMENT 3 (1):9-26.score: 24.0
    Most Enlightenment thinkers believed that the World’s order (as ultimately based on divine laws) is good and thus every gain of knowledge will have good consequences. Scientific process was assumed to entail moral progress. In fact some moral progress did occur in the Western civilization and science contributed to it, but it is widely incommensurate with the progress of science. The Enlightenment’s concept of a concerted scientific and moral progress proved largely wrong for several reasons. (1) (...)
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  21. Terry Quinn (2012). Invitation to Functional Collaboration: Dynamics of Progress in the Sciences, Technologies, and Arts. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7.score: 24.0
    In all disciplines there is the question of how to promote progress and offset decline. But, what are progress and decline ? For this short article, the main discussion centers on biology. A solution called functional specialization begins to emerge as relevant to all of the sciences, technologies and arts. This introductory article ends with some heuristics on various follow-up issues.
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  22. Nikil Mukerji (2014). Technological Progress and Responsibility. In Fiorella Battaglia, Nikil Mukerji & Julian Nida-Rümelin (eds.), Rethinking Responsibility in Science and Technology. Pisa University Press. 25-36.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I will examine how technological progress affects the responsibilities of human agents. To this end, I will distinguish between two interpretations of the concept of responsibility, viz. responsibility as attributability and substantive responsibility. On the former interpretation, responsibility has to do with the idea of authorship. When we say that a person is responsible for her actions we mean that she is to be seen as the author of these actions. They can be attributed to her, (...)
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  23. Jeremy R. Simon (2011). How to Make Real, Constructive, Progress in Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):847-851.score: 24.0
    Rationale One's understanding of medical progress – what it is, how it is pursued and how it is assessed – may be deeply dependent on one's understanding of the metaphysics of medicine, and of diseases in particular. -/- Aims and Objectives In this paper I present a new account of the nature of diseases, neither realist nor constructivist, and describe what progress in medicine looks like if we understand diseases in this way. -/- Conclusions This new account, Constructive (...)
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  24. Adrian Mitchell Currie (2013). Narratives, Mechanisms and Progress in Historical Science. Synthese 191 (6):1-21.score: 24.0
    Geologists, Paleontologists and other historical scientists are frequently concerned with narrative explanations targeting single cases. I show that two distinct explanatory strategies are employed in narratives, simple and complex. A simple narrative has minimal causal detail and is embedded in a regularity, whereas a complex narrative is more detailed and not embedded. The distinction is illustrated through two case studies: the ‘snowball earth’ explanation of Neoproterozoic glaciation and recent attempts to explain gigantism in Sauropods. This distinction is revelatory of historical (...)
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  25. Cameron Shelley (2001). Aspects of Visual Argument: A Study of the March of Progress. Informal Logic 21 (2).score: 24.0
    The so-called March of Progress depicts human evolution as a linear progression from mohkey to man. Shelley (1996) analyzed this image as a visual argument proceeding through "rhetorical" and "demonstrative" modes of visual logic. In this paper, I confirm and extend this view of visual logic by examining variations of the original March image. These variations show that each mode of visual logic can be altered or isolated in support of new conclusions. Furthermore, the March can be included in (...)
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  26. Todd Grantham (1994). Does Science Have a “Global Goal?”: A Critique of Hull's View of Conceptual Progress. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):85-97.score: 22.0
    Hull's recent work in evolutionary epistemology is marred by a deep tension. While he maintains that conceptual and biological evolution are both driven by selection processes, he also claims that only the former is globally progressive. In this paper I formulate this tension and present four possible responses (including Hull's). I argue that Hull's position rests on the assumption that there is a goal which is sufficiently general to describe most scientific activity yet precise enough to guide research. Working from (...)
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  27. Mauro Dorato (2011). TRUTH, LAWS AND THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE. Manuscrito 34 (1):185-204.score: 21.0
    In this paper I analyze the difficult question of the truth of mature scientific theories by tackling the problem of the truth of laws. After introducing the main philosophical positions in the field of scientific realism, I discuss and then counter the two main arguments against realism, namely the pessimistic metainduction and the abstract and idealized character of scientific laws. I conclude by defending the view that well-confirmed physical theories are true only relatively to certain values of the variables that (...)
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  28. E. R. Dodds (1973/1985). The Ancient Concept of Progress and Other Essays on Greek Literature and Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    This provocative collection of essays written by the influential Greek scholar E. R. Dodds between 1929 and 1971. represents the wide range of his literary and philosophical interests. Insightful and learned, the essays combine profound scholarship with the lucid humanity of a teacher aware of the special value of Greek studies in the modern world.
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  29. Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Vikki Entwistle (2011). Virtue, Progress and Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):839-846.score: 21.0
  30. Juan Manuel Jaramillo Uribe (2011). Is compatible the idea of incommensurability with that of scientific progress? Some reasons in support of its compatibility. [Spanish]. Eidos 5:10-49.score: 21.0
    El problema de la inconmensurabilidad y, en particular, el del progreso científico, está asociado a -dos nombres: Kuhn y Feyerabend, cuyas propuestas hicieron que muchos pusieran en duda la aparente evidencia del llamado “progreso científico, relativizando su validez a cada escuela o paradigma. En este escrito mostraremos que este tipo de relativismo epistémico — al igual que la teoría convergentista de la verdad — carecen de validez filosófica e histórica y de qué modo la idea de “progreso científico es compatible (...)
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  31. Clinton E. Betts (2005). Progress, Epistemology and Human Health and Welfare: What Nurses Need to Know and Why. Nursing Philosophy 6 (3):174-188.score: 21.0
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  32. Elizabeth A. Herdman (2001). The Illusion of Progress in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 2 (1):4-13.score: 21.0
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  33. Ronald Aronson (2013). Pinker and Progress. History and Theory 52 (2):246-264.score: 21.0
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  34. Robert D. Meade (1963). Effect of Motivation and Progress on the Estimation of Longer Time Intervals. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (6):564.score: 21.0
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  35. Robert D. Meade (1959). Time Estimates as Affected by Motivational Level, Goal Distance, and Rate of Progress. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (4):275.score: 21.0
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  36. Federico Zuolo (2009). Kant's Conception of Moral Progress: Ontological Impossibility and Practical Necessity. Rivista di Filosofia 3 (3):373-396.score: 21.0
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  37. Christopher Dawson (1929/1970). Progress and Religion. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 21.0
     
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  38. E. H. Gombrich (1971). The Ideas of Progress and Their Impact on Art. [New York]Cooper Union School of Art and Architecture.score: 21.0
     
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  39. Frederick Charles Green (1950/1977). Rousseau and the Idea of Progress. Folcroft Library Editions.score: 21.0
     
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  40. James J. Hoecker (1987). Joseph Priestl[E]y and the Idea of Progress. Garland Pub..score: 21.0
  41. la Vega & Francis Joseph (1949). Social Progress and Happiness in the Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas and Contemporary American Sociology. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.score: 21.0
  42. Oliver Lodge (1927). Science and Human Progress. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..score: 21.0
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  43. David W. Marcell (1974). Progress and Pragmatism: James, Dewey, Beard, and the American Idea of Progress. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 21.0
     
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  44. Arthur M. Melzer, Jerry Weinberger & M. Richard Zinman (eds.) (1995). History and the Idea of Progress. Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
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  45. Silvia Sebastiani (2013). The Scottish Enlightenment: Race, Gender, and the Limits of Progress. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 21.0
  46. Alan Tapper (1996). Priestley on Politics, Progress and Moral Theology. In Knud Haakonssen (ed.), Enlightenment and Religion: Rational Dissent in Eighteenth-Century Britain. 272-86.score: 21.0
  47. Alexander Bird (2007). What is Scientific Progress? Noûs 41 (1):64–89.score: 18.0
    I argue that scientific progress is precisely the accumulation of scientific knowledge.
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  48. Theo A. F. Kuipers (2005). The Threefold Evaluation of Theories: A Synopsis of From Instrumentalism to Constructive Realism. On Some Relations Between Confirmation, Empirical Progress, and Truth Approximation (2000). Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):23-85.score: 18.0
    Surprisingly enough, modified versions of the confirmation theory of Carnap and Hempel and the truth approximation theory of Popper turn out to be smoothly synthesizable. The glue between confirmation and truth approximation appears to be the instrumentalist methodology, rather than the falsificationist one.By evaluating theories separately and comparatively in terms of their successes and problems (hence even if they are already falsified), the instrumentalist methodology provides – both in theory and in practice – the straight route for short-term empirical (...) in science in the spirit of Laudan. However, it is argued that such progress is also functional for all kinds of truth approximation: observational, referential, and theoretical. This sheds new light on the long-term dynamic of science and hence on the relation between the main epistemological positions, viz., instrumentalism (Toulmin, Laudan), constructive empiricism (van Fraassen), referential realism (Hacking and Cartwright), and theory realism of a non-essentialist nature (Popper), here called constructive realism.In From Instrumentalism to Constructive Realism (2000) the above story is presented in great detail. The present synopsis highlights the main ways of theory evaluation presented in that book, viz. evaluation in terms of confirmation (or falsification), empirical progress and truth approximation. (shrink)
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  49. Axel Honneth (2007). The Irreducibility of Progress: Kant's Account of the Relationship Between Morality and History. Critical Horizons 8 (1):1-17.score: 18.0
    In the last thirty years of his life Kant was preoccupied with the question of whether or not the "signs of progress" could be elicited from the vale of tears of the historical process. In what follows I am interested in the question of what kind of meaning Kant's historico-philosophical hypothesis of progress can have for us today. In order to provide an answer to this question, I make a distinction between system-conforming and system-bursting, or unorthodox, versions of (...)
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  50. Gustavo Cevolani & Luca Tambolo (2013). Progress as Approximation to the Truth: A Defence of the Verisimilitudinarian Approach. Erkenntnis 78 (4):921-935.score: 18.0
    In this paper we provide a compact presentation of the verisimilitudinarian approach to scientific progress (VS, for short) and defend it against the sustained attack recently mounted by Alexander Bird (2007). Advocated by such authors as Ilkka Niiniluoto and Theo Kuipers, VS is the view that progress can be explained in terms of the increasing verisimilitude (or, equivalently, truthlikeness, or approximation to the truth) of scientific theories. According to Bird, VS overlooks the central issue of the appropriate grounding (...)
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