Search results for 'Progressive education' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Norman Dale Norris (2004). The Promise and Failure of Progressive Education. Scarecroweducation.score: 180.0
    What is progressive education? -- Origins of progressive education -- Progressive education in action: what really happens -- Broken promises: why progressive education has failed to deliver -- Making progressive education work: perspectives, conclusions, and recommendations.
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  2. William Hayes (2006). The Progressive Education Movement: Is It Still a Factor in Today's Schools? Rowman & Littlefield Education.score: 180.0
    The rise of progressive education -- John Dewey -- Other pioneers in the progressive education movement -- The progressive education movement during the first half of the twentieth century -- The fifties -- The sixties and seventies -- A nation at risk (1983) -- The eighties and nineties -- No child left behind -- Maria Montessori -- Teacher education programs -- Middle schools -- Choice -- Education of the gifted and talented -- (...)
     
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  3. Natalie K. Camper (2010). Testing, Guidance and Curriculum: The Impact of Progressive Education in Waltham, Massachusetts, 1918-1968. Educational Studies 9 (2):159-171.score: 122.0
    (1978). Testing, Guidance and Curriculum: The Impact of Progressive Education in Waltham, Massachusetts, 1918-1968. Educational Studies: Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 159-171.
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  4. Dennis Carlson (2002). Leaving Safe Harbors: Toward a New Progressivism in American Education and Public Life. Routledge Falmer.score: 108.0
    Leaving Safe Harbors offers radical readings of conventional literature, and makes creative use of philosophy, literature, film and popular culture as it maps out a future for progressive education. Award winning author Dennis Carlson re-scripts the myths embedded in the works of Plato, Hegel, Nietzsche and Heidegger and analyzes them alongside such popular phenomena as Ridley Scott's Bladerunner and the British Punk group, The Sex Pistols. In his fluid writing style, he lucidly illustrates how these modern "myths" may (...)
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  5. Klas Roth (2012). Education and a Progressive Orientation Towards a Cosmopolitan Society. Ethics and Education 7 (1):59 - 73.score: 102.0
    Robin Barrow claims in his ?Moral education's modest agenda? that ?the task of moral education is to develop understanding, at the lowest level, of the expectations of society and, at the highest level, of the nature of morality???[that is, that moral education] should go on to develop understanding, not of a particular social code, but of the nature of morality ? of the principles that provide the framework within which practical decisions have to be made? [Barrow, R. (...)
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  6. Harold Bernard Alberty (ed.) (1940). Progressive Education: Its Philosophy and Challenge. [New York.score: 102.0
     
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  7. Uday Shanker (1978). Progressive Education. Indian Publcations.score: 102.0
     
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  8. Aaron Schutz (2011). Power and Trust in the Public Realm: John Dewey, Saul Alinsky, and the Limits of Progressive Democratic Education. Educational Theory 61 (4):491-512.score: 100.0
    Throughout the twentieth century, middle-class progressives embraced visions of democracy rooted in their relatively privileged life experiences. Progressive educators developed pedagogies designed to nurture the individual voice within egalitarian classrooms, assuming that collective action in the public realm could be modeled on the relatively safe small-group interactions they were familiar with in their families, schools, and associations. Partly as a result, they remained blind to (and often denigrated) the democratic aspects of working-class organizations, such as unions and community action (...)
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  9. Rose A. Rutnitski (2012). Leta Stetter Hollingworth and the Speyer School, 1935-1940: Historical Roots of the Contradictions in Progressive Education for Gifted Children. [REVIEW] Education and Culture 13 (1):2.score: 96.0
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  10. Jacque Ensign (1996). A Conversation Between John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner: A Comparison of Waldorf and Progressive Education. Educational Theory 46 (2):175-188.score: 92.0
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  11. Dennis Carlson (1995). Making Progress: Progressive Education in the Postmodern. Educational Theory 45 (3):337-357.score: 92.0
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  12. John H. Kohler (1982). The Confluence of New Left and Old Right Persistent Criticism of Progressive Education. Educational Theory 32 (1):1-8.score: 92.0
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  13. Paul Nash (1964). The Strange Death of Progressive Education. Educational Theory 14 (2):65-82.score: 92.0
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  14. John F. Roche (1990). Building for Democracy: Organic Architecture in Relation to Progressive Education. Educational Theory 40 (3):295-308.score: 92.0
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  15. Clarence Karier (1970). Review of Patricia Albjerg Graham's Progressive Education: From Arcade to Academe. [REVIEW] Educational Theory 20 (2):197-201.score: 92.0
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  16. Leslie J. Francis & Zoë Grindle (1998). Whatever Happened to Progressive Education? A Comparison of Primary School Teachers' Attitudes in 1982 and 1996. Educational Studies 24 (3):269-279.score: 92.0
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  17. Henry C. Johnson (1965). Progressive Education: A Case of Arrested Development? A Brief Critical Review of Twentieth Century Educational Theory. Educational Theory 15 (3):188-197.score: 92.0
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  18. Abraham Kaufman (1965). Progressive Education: Fact or Moral Concept? Educational Theory 15 (1):7-12.score: 92.0
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  19. Yoon K. Pak (2001). Progressive Education and the Limits of Racial Recognition, Revisited. Educational Theory 51 (4):487-497.score: 92.0
  20. W. A. Campbell Stewart (1979). Progressive Education-Past Present and Future. British Journal of Educational Studies 27 (2):103 - 110.score: 92.0
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  21. Paul Theobald (1990). Foxfire Reconsidered: A Twenty-Year Experiment in Progressive Education. Educational Theory 40 (2):249-254.score: 92.0
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  22. Leslie J. Francis[1] & Zoë Grindle (1998). Whatever Happened to Progressive Education? A Comparison of Primary School Teachers' Attitudes in 1982 and 1996. Educational Studies 24 (3):269-279.score: 92.0
    Summary Two cohorts of teachers working full?time in Church of England voluntary?aided and voluntary?controlled first, primary and middle (deemed primary) schools within the Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich were invited to complete a questionnaire concerned with teaching styles in 1982 and again in 1996. The data demonstrate a significant shift toward placing greater value on traditional teaching styles between 1982 and 1996.
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  23. John Dewey (1939). John Dewey and the Promise of America, Progressive Education Booklet, No. 14, American Education Press.score: 90.0
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  24. Walter Feinberg (1992). Progressive Education and Social Planning. In J. E. Tiles (ed.), John Dewey: Critical Assessments. Routledge. 2--168.score: 90.0
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  25. Katharine D. Kennedy (1994). The Politics of Progressive Education: The Odenwaldschule in Nazi Germany. History of European Ideas 18 (4):591-593.score: 90.0
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  26. Colin Richards (2001). Yet Another 'Crisis' in Primary Education? Anatomy of an Aborted, Unpublished Enquiry 1948-1951. British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (1):4 - 25.score: 86.0
    In the period since 1944 English primary education has been subject to recurring criticism. Official enquiries, surveys of attainment, individual causes-célèbres and the pronouncements of pundits have drawn attention to purported 'crises'. The paper discusses the background, procedures and findings of the earliest of the post-war official enquiries - an unpublished and previously uncited investigation by the Central Advisory Council for Education (England).
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  27. Klas Roth (2013). A Cosmopolitan Design of Teacher Education and a Progressive Orientation Towards the Highest Good. Ethics and Global Politics 5 (4).score: 84.0
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  28. Richard A. Brosio (2000). Philosophical Scaffolding for the Construction of Critical Democratic Education. P. Lang.score: 78.0
  29. Avi I. Mintz (2012). The Happy and Suffering Student? Rousseau's Emile and the Path Not Taken in Progressive Educational Thought. Educational Theory 62 (3):249-265.score: 74.0
    One of the mantras of progressive education is that genuine learning ought to be exciting and pleasurable, rather than joyless and painful. To a significant extent, Jean-Jacques Rousseau is associated with this mantra. In a theme of Emile that is often neglected in the educational literature, however, Rousseau stated that “to suffer is the first thing [Emile] ought to learn and the thing he will most need to know.” Through a discussion of Rousseau's argument for the importance of (...)
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  30. Doris Santoro Gómez (2008). Women's Proper Place and Student-Centered Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (5):313-333.score: 66.0
  31. Naoko Saito (2005). The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    In the name of efficiency, the practice of education has come to be dominated by neoliberal ideology and procedures of standardization and quantification. Such attempts to make all aspects of practice transparent and subject to systematic accounting lack sensitivity to the invisible and the silent, to something in the human condition that cannot readily be expressed in an either-or form. Seeking alternatives to such trends, Saito reads Dewey’s idea of progressive education through the lens of Emersonian moral (...)
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  32. Mecîd Kakeweys (2008). Basêk le Binemay Perwerde W Fêrkirdin U Komełgay Pêşkewtû. Dezgay Twêjînewe W Biławkirdinewey Mukiryanî.score: 60.0
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  33. Noam Chomsky (2003). Chomsky on Democracy & Education. Routledgefalmer.score: 54.0
    Education stands at the intersection of Noam Chomsky's two lives as scholar and social critic: As a linguist he is keenly interested in how children acquire language, and as a political activist he views the education system as an important lever of social change. Chomsky on Democracy and Education gathers for the first time his impressive range of writings on these subjects, some previously unpublished and not readily available to the general public. Raised in a progressive (...)
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  34. Cristina Allemann-Ghionda (2000). Dewey in Postwar-Italy: The Case of Re-Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):53-67.score: 54.0
    After the end of the Second World War, Italy was thefirst Axis country (followed by Germany and Japan), toundergo a process of ``reeducation'' by the alliedtroops, focusing initially on the education system.Under the direction of American scholars and schoolinnovators, school syllabi and textbooks wererewritten in order to replace the ideologicalindoctrination exerted by the Fascist regime from 1923to 1943 with democratic ideas. This articlereconstructs different phases of the influence of JohnDewey's progressive education in Italy. This influencewas predominant in (...)
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  35. Mordecai Bar‐Lev & Yuval Dror (1995). Education for Work in the Kibbutz as a Means Towards Personal, Social and Learning Fulfilment. Journal of Moral Education 24 (3):259-272.score: 54.0
    Abstract This article attempts to present education for work in the kibbutz, with regard to the most up to date international literature in the field. The first part explains how the ideals of the Jewish tradition, of Socialist Zionism and progressive education made education for work so central in the kibbutz. In the second part, the unique philosophical and practical approach to self?realisation in society and in study in the kibbutz is described. In the final part, (...)
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  36. Alan H. Cromer (1997). Connected Knowledge: Science, Philosophy, and Education. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    When physicist Alan Sokal recently submitted an article to the postmodernist journal Social Text, the periodical's editors were happy to publish it--for here was a respected scientist offering support for the journal's view that science is a subjective, socially constructed discipline. But as Sokal himself soon revealed in Lingua Franca magazine, the essay was a spectacular hoax--filled with scientific gibberish anyone with a basic knowledge of physics should have caught--and the academic world suddenly awoke to the vast gap that has (...)
     
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  37. Jay Roberts (2007). Education, Eco-Progressivism and the Nature of School Reform. Educational Studies 41 (3):212-229.score: 50.0
    This article is an attempt to critique some of the limitations of dominant school reform discourses in education, drawing upon the work of Michel Foucault, Michael Apple, Maxine Greene, and Dennis Carlson, in addition to writers in the emerging field of what might be called ?eco-progressivism.? The intersections between ecology and education can help construct a distinct counternarrative of progressive educational reform that is informed by ecological discourses, movements, and zeitgeists. Through the field of conservation biology, I (...)
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  38. Charles Bingham (2010). Settling No Conflict in the Public Place: Truth in Education, and in Rancièrean Scholarship. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):649-665.score: 48.0
    This essay offers an educational understanding of truth deriving from the work of Jacques Rancière. Unlike other educational accounts—the traditional, progressive, and critical accounts—of truth that take education as a way of approaching pre-existing truths (or lack of pre-existing truths), this essay establishes an account of truth that is intrinsic to education. It uses Rancière's language theory to do so, showing that Rancière's own perspective on truth is in fact opposed to the one so often promoted in (...)
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  39. Daniel Pekarsky (1983). Moral Choice and Education. Journal of Moral Education 12 (1):3-13.score: 48.0
    Abstract Moral education need not be construed as an attempt to inculcate particular moral beliefs; it can profitably be understood as an attempt to help children acquire the skills, attitudes, and dispositions that will enable them to make their own moral choices intelligently. If moral education is construed in this way, it is crucial that it begin with an adequate conception of moral choice. The thesis of the paper is that the conception of moral choice that has guided (...)
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  40. Aaron S. Richmond * & Rhoda Cummings (2004). In Support of the Cognitive‐Developmental Approach to Moral Education: A Response to David Carr. Journal of Moral Education 33 (2):197-205.score: 48.0
    David Carr (2002) has argued against the use of developmental theories as a basis for curriculum development in moral education. Although we find common ground with some aspects of Carr's arguments, we disagree with several of his criticisms of the cognitive?developmental approach to moral education. He confuses romantic ideology (as espoused by Rousseau and others) and progressive ideology (as espoused by Dewey and others); he assumes that developmental theories have no endpoint or final goal from which to (...)
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  41. Ellen Durrigan Santora (2012). Historiographic Perspectives of Context and Progress During a Half Century of Progressive Educational Reform. Education and Culture 16 (1):2.score: 48.0
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  42. Noah De Lissovoy (2011). Pedagogy in Common: Democratic Education in the Global Era. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1119-1134.score: 46.0
    In the context of the increasingly transnational organization of society, culture, and communication, this article develops a conceptualization of the global common as a basic condition of interrelation and shared experience, and describes contemporary political efforts to fully democratize this condition. The article demonstrates the implications for curriculum and teaching of this project, describing in particular the importance of fundamentally challenging the interpellation of students as subjects of the nation, and the necessity for new and radically collaborative forms of political (...)
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  43. Tim McDonough (2011). Initiation, Not Indoctrination: Confronting the Grotesque in Cultural Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):706-723.score: 44.0
    The goal of this article is to differentiate initiation from indoctrination, and to return a positive significance to the notion of initiation, as a pedagogy that contributes not only to the perpetuation of a particular form of life or community, but that provides the next generation with means to advance that knowledge beyond its existing boundaries. When we conflate the terms ‘initiation’ and ‘indoctrination’ or only mark a minor difference between the two, we lose meaning. The explanatory and predictive power (...)
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  44. Olivier Michaud (2012). Thinking About the Nature and Role of Authority in Democratic Education with Rousseau's Emile. Educational Theory 62 (3):287-304.score: 44.0
    Educational authority is an issue in contemporary democracies. Surprisingly, little attention has been given to the problem of authority in Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Emile and his work has not been addressed in the contemporary debate on the issue of authority in democratic education. Olivier Michaud's goals are, first, to address both of these oversights by offering an original reading of the problem of authority in Emile and then to rehabilitate the notion of “educational authority” for democratic educators today. Contrary to (...)
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  45. Tal Gilead (2011). The Provenances of Economic Theory's Impact on Education: French Educational Thought at the End of the Ancien Régime. Educational Theory 61 (1):55-73.score: 44.0
    Today, the influence of economic thought on educational theory is evident. It seems to weaken, however, the further we travel back in history. In this article, Tal Gilead examines the historical origins of this influence. He shows that it first emerged in French educational thought during the second half of the eighteenth century. Through analyzing a number of books on educational theory from this period, Gilead demonstrates the educational impact of two innovative economic ideas: first, the idea that wealth stems (...)
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  46. John Beck (2007). Education and the Middle Classes: Against Reductionism in Educational Theory and Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (1):37 - 55.score: 44.0
    This paper critiques what it sees as a tendency on the part of certain social researchers to engage in moralistic critiques of middle-class parents, especially in relation to the choices and actions of such parents within educational quasi-markets. It proceeds to a linked critique of the influence within education of certain aspects of the work of Pierre Bourdieu, with particular reference to the concepts of symbolic violence and the depiction of cultural meanings as arbitrary. It is argued that both (...)
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  47. Gary McCulloch (2012). The Standing Conference on Studies in Education — Sixty Years On. British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (4):301 - 316.score: 44.0
    This paper assesses the origins, character and legacy of the Standing Conference on Studies in Education (SCSE), established in 1951. In the historical and theoretical context of British educational studies, the SCSE, despite its outward appearance as an elite and conservative body, represented a progressive and even radical movement, and played a significant part in the emergence of a modernised and more fully developed approach to the study of education in post-war Britain. In contrast to Scotland, educational (...)
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  48. Ilan Gur-Zeev (2011). Philosophy of Education in a Poor Historical Moment: A Personal Account. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):477-483.score: 42.0
    Under the post-metaphysical sky “old” humanistic-oriented education is possible solely at the cost of its transformation into its negative, into a power that is determined to diminish human potentials for self-exaltation. Nothing less than total metamorphosis is needed to rescue the core of humanistic genesis: the quest for edifying Life and resistance to the call for “home-returning” into the total harmony that is promised to us within nothingness.
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  49. Richard A. Smith & John R. Leach (2010). Liberal Arts Education and Brain Plasticity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (2):119-130.score: 42.0
    This paper addresses what some view as a progressive and decades-long devaluing of the liberal arts in our educational institutions and society at large. It draws attention to symptoms of this trend and possible contributing factors, identifies benefits commonly attributed to the liberal arts, and then shows how insights from recent research on neuroplasticity provide good reason to believe that a traditional liberal education has positive effects on a person's brain. The paper supports the thesis that well-designed liberal (...)
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  50. Anthony O'Hear (2012). Education and the Modern State. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):322-335.score: 42.0
    In this paper I show how modern democratic states are likely to be inimical to traditional liberal education. Drawing on theoretical considerations and recent history I show how any attempt to promote traditional educational values through state interventions, such as national curricula or state regulation, is bound to be illusory. The preservation of liberal education will best be served by the wholesale removal of education from the progressive state and its bureaucracies.
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