Search results for 'Pronoun' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Eyal Sagi & Lance J. Rips (2014). Identity, Causality, and Pronoun Ambiguity. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):663-680.
    This article looks at the way people determine the antecedent of a pronoun in sentence pairs, such as: Albert invited Ron to dinner. He spent hours cleaning the house. The experiment reported here is motivated by the idea that such judgments depend on reasoning about identity . Because the identity of an individual over time depends on the causal-historical path connecting the stages of the individual, the correct antecedent will also depend on causal connections. The experiment varied how likely (...)
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  2. Harold W. Noonan (2012). Personal Pronoun Revisionism - Asking the Right Question. Analysis 72 (2):316-318.
    Personal pronoun revisionism (so-called by Olson, E. 2007. What are We? A Study in Personal Ontology. Oxford: Oxford University Press) is a response to the problem of the thinking animal on behalf of the neo-Lockean theorist. Many worry about this response. The worry rests on asking the wrong question, namely: how can two thinkers that are so alike differ in this way in their cognitive capacities? This is the wrong question because they don't. The right question is: how can (...)
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  3.  15
    Zhan Shi, Aibao Zhou, Wei Han & Peiru Liu (2011). Effects of Ownership Expressed by the First-Person Possessive Pronoun. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):951-955.
    The present study examined the behavioral effects of the first-person possessive pronoun. In each trial, a noun was presented to participants after visual presentation of a (...)
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  4.  3
    Hazel Pearson (2015). The Interpretation of the Logophoric Pronoun in Ewe. Natural Language Semantics 23 (2):77-118.
    This paper presents novel data regarding the logophoric pronoun in Ewe. We show that, contrary to what had been assumed in the absence of the necessary fieldwork, Ewe logophors are not obligatorily interpreted de se. We discuss the prima facie rather surprising nature of this discovery given the assumptions that de se construals arise via binding of the pronoun by an abstraction operator in the left periphery of the clausal complement of an attitude predicate, and that logophors are (...)
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  5.  17
    J. Lambek (2007). From Word to Sentence: A Pregroup Analysis of the Object Pronoun Who ( M ). [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 16 (3):303-323.
    We explore a computational algebraic approach to grammar via pregroups, that is, partially ordered monoids in which each element has both a left and a right adjoint. Grammatical judgements are formed with the help of calculations on types. These are elements of the free pregroup generated by a partially ordered set of basic types, which are assigned to words, here of English. We concentrate on the object pronoun who(m).
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  6.  7
    Jacolien Rij, Hedderik Rijn & Petra Hendriks (2013). How WM Load Influences Linguistic Processing in Adults: A Computational Model of Pronoun Interpretation in Discourse. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):564-580.
    This paper presents a study of the effect of working memory load on the interpretation of pronouns in different discourse contexts: stories with and without a topic shift. We discuss a computational model (in ACT-R, Anderson, 2007) to explain how referring expressions are acquired and used. On the basis of simulations of this model, it is predicted that WM constraints only affect adults' pronoun resolution in stories with a topic shift, but not in stories without a topic shift. This (...)
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  7.  12
    José Luis Bermudez (2002). Domain-Generality and the Relative Pronoun. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):676-677.
    The hypothesis in the target paper is that the cognitive function of language lies in making possible the integration of different types of domain-specific information. The case for this hypothesis must consist, at least in part, of a constructive proposal as to what feature or features of natural language allows this integration to take place. This commentary suggests that the vital linguistic element is the relative pronoun and the possibility it affords of forming relative clauses.
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  8.  3
    Gaëtanelle Gilquin & George Jacobs (2006). Elephants Who Marry Mice Are Very Unusual: The Use of the Relative Pronoun Who with Nonhuman Animals. Society and Animals 14 (1):79-105.
    This paper explores the use of the relative pronoun with nonhuman animals. The paper looks at what dictionaries, an encyclopedia, grammars, publication manuals, newspapers, and news agencies say and do relative to this issue. In addition to investigating the views and practices of these authoritative publications, the study also searched a 100-million-word collection of spoken and written English. The study found that while some reference works reject or ignore the use of with nonhuman animals, other works discuss the possibility, (...)
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  9.  2
    Gaëtanelle Gilquin & George M. Jacobs (2006). Elephants Who Marry Mice Are Very Unusual: The Use of the Relative Pronoun Who with Nonhuman Animals. Society and Animals 14 (1):79-105.
    This paper explores the use of the relative pronoun with nonhuman animals. The paper looks at what dictionaries, an encyclopedia, grammars, publication manuals, newspapers, and news agencies say and do relative to this issue. In addition to investigating the views and practices of these authoritative publications, the study also searched a 100-million-word collection of spoken and written English. The study found that while some reference works reject or ignore the use of with nonhuman animals, other works discuss the possibility, (...)
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  10. Thomas Ming (forthcoming). Who Does the Sounding? The Metaphysics of the First-Person Pronoun in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-23.
    In classical Chinese wu 吾 is commonly employed as the first-person pronoun, similar to wo 我 that retains its use in modern Chinese. Although these two words are usually understood as stylistic variants of “I,” “me,” and “myself,” Chinese scholars of the Zhuangzi 莊子 have long been aware of the possible differences in their semantics, especially in the philosophical context of discussing the relation between the self and the person, as evinced by their occurrences in the much-discussed line “Now (...)
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  11. Harold W. Noonan (2010). The Thinking Animal Problem and Personal Pronoun Revisionism. Analysis 70 (1):93-98.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  12. Christopher Heath Wellman (2000). Relational Facts in Liberal Political Theory: Is There Magic in the Pronoun 'My'? Ethics 110 (3):537-562.
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  13.  6
    J. Arnold (2000). The Rapid Use of Gender Information: Evidence of the Time Course of Pronoun Resolution From Eyetracking. Cognition 76 (1):B13-B26.
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  14. Arvid Båve (2009). Why is a Truth-Predicate Like a Pronoun? Philosophical Studies 145 (2):297 - 310.
    I begin with an exposition of the two main variants of the Prosentential Theory of Truth (PT), those of Dorothy Grover et al. and Robert Brandom. Three main types of criticisms are then put forward: (1) material criticisms to the effect that (PT) does not adequately explain the linguistic data, (2) an objection to the effect that no variant of (PT) gives a properly unified account of the various occurrences of "true" in English, and, most importantly, (3) a charge that (...)
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  15. Francesco D'Introno, Full and Null Pronouns in Spanish: The Zero Pronoun Hypothesis.
    Montalbetti (1984) points out certain semantic differences between phonetically full and phonetically empty pronouns (henceforth full and n u l l pronouns) that challenge the traditional interpretive parallelism between empty and full categories (see Chomsky 1981, 1982). He shows that both in subject (1) and object position (2), while null pronouns can be interpreted as bound variables (as in (1a) and (2a) ), full pronouns cannot (as in (1c) and (2c)).
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  16.  37
    Chuansheng He (2013). E-Type Interpretation Without E-Type Pronoun: How Peirce's Graphs Capture the Uniqueness Implication of Donkey Pronouns in Discourse Anaphora. Synthese 192 (4):1-20.
    In this essay, we propose that Peirce’s Existential Graphs can derive the desired uniqueness implication (or in a weaker claim, the definite description readings) of donkey pronouns in conjunctive discourse (A man walks in the park. He whistles), without postulating a separate category of E-type pronouns.
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  17.  78
    C. W. van Staden (2002). Linguistic Markers of Recovery: Theoretical Underpinnings of First Person Pronoun Usage and Semantic Positions of Patients. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):105-121.
  18.  59
    Michael J. White (1979). The First Person Pronoun: A Reply to Anscombe and Clarke. Analysis 39 (3):120 - 123.
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  19.  56
    Alasdair MacIntyre (1983). The Magic in the Pronoun "My":Moral Luck. Bernard Williams. Ethics 94 (1):113-.
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  20. P. C. Gordon (1992). Pronominalization and Discourse Coherence, Discourse Structure, and Pronoun Interpretation. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):486-486.
     
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  21.  14
    Hans Johann Glock & P. M. S. Hacker, Reference and the First Person Pronoun.
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  22.  2
    Ellen H. Grober, William Beardsley & Alfonso Caramazza (1978). Parallel Function Strategy in Pronoun Assignment. Cognition 6 (2):117-133.
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  23.  9
    Masha Vassilieva & Richard K. Larson (2005). The Semantics of the Plural Pronoun Construction. Natural Language Semantics 13 (2):101-124.
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  24.  9
    Patrick Suppes (2002). Linguistic Markers of Recovery: Underpinnings of First Person Pronoun Usage and Semantic Positions of Patients. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):127-129.
  25.  37
    Hiroshi Kojima (1998). On the Semantic Duplicity of the First Person Pronoun “I”. Continental Philosophy Review 31 (3):307-320.
  26.  2
    Catherine Garvey, Alfonso Caramazza & Jack Yates (1974). Factors Influencing Assignment of Pronoun Antecedents. Cognition 3 (3):227-243.
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  27.  32
    Avrum Stroll (1963). The Paradox of the First Person Singular Pronoun. Inquiry 6 (1-4):217 – 233.
  28.  1
    John S. Robertson & Jeffrey S. Turley (2003). A Peircean Analysis of the American-Spanish Clitic Pronoun System. Semiotica 2003 (145).
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  29.  13
    Susan Mendus (2003). The Magic in the Pronoun My. In Matt Matravers (ed.), Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. Frank Cass 33-52.
    In What We Owe to Each Other, T.M. Scanlon says that any acceptable moral teory must answer what he calls the priority question: the question of why moral value should takes priority over other values, such as the values of love and friendship. In this essay I discuss Scanlon's answer to the priority question and contrast it with the answer offered by Christine Korsgaard in Sources of Normativity. I argue that each account contains important insights but that neither is completely (...)
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  30.  5
    Alasdair MacIntyre (1983). Review: The Magic in the Pronoun "My". [REVIEW] Ethics 94 (1):113 - 125.
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  31.  1
    J. B. Poynton (1926). The Position of the Possessive Pronoun in Cicero's Orations. (A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the Graduate College of the State University of Iowa.) By Edgar Allen Menk. Pp. 71. Grand Forks, North Dakota: Normanden Publishing Company, 1925. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (06):219-.
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  32.  1
    A. C. Moorhouse (1992). Roger D. Woodard: On Interpreting Morphological Change: The Greek Reflexive Pronoun. Pp. Viii + 134. Amsterdam: J. C. Gieben, 1990. Paper, Fl. 60. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):213-214.
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  33.  1
    A. C. Moorhouse & W. F. Bakker (1976). Pronomen Abundans and Pronomen Coniunctum: A Contribution to the History of the Resumptive Pronoun Within the Relative Clause in Greek. Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:203.
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  34. Robert Almeder (2000). The Upright Pronoun: A Gentle Reminder. American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (4):421-422.
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  35. Harry E. Blanchard (1987). The Effects of Pronoun Processing on Information Utilization During Fixations in Reading. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (3):171-174.
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  36. Petra Hendriks, Coherent Discourse Solves the Pronoun Interpretation Problem.
     
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  37. Yael Tamir (1995). Five. The Magic Pronoun “My”. In Liberal Nationalism. Princeton University Press 95-116.
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  38.  13
    John Corcoran & Sriram Nambiar (2014). Conversely: Extrapropositional and Prosentential. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 20:404-5.
    This self-contained lecture examines uses and misuses of the adverb conversely with special attention to logic and logic-related fields. Sometimes adding conversely after a conjunction such as and signals redundantly that a converse of what preceded will follow. -/- (1) Tarski read Church and, conversely, Church read Tarski. -/- In such cases, conversely serves as an extrapropositional constituent of the sentence in which it occurs: deleting conversely doesn’t change the proposition expressed. Nevertheless it does introduce new implicatures: a speaker would (...)
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  39.  27
    Elizabeth Burns (2015). Classical and Revisionary Theism on the Divine as Personal: A Rapprochement? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (2):151-165.
    To claim that the divine is a person or personal is, according to Swinburne, ‘the most elementary claim of theism’. I argue that, whether the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal is construed as an analogy or a metaphor, or a combination of the two, analysis necessitates qualification of that concept such that any differences between the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal and revisionary interpretations of that concept are merely (...)
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  40.  12
    Kumiko Fukumura & Roger P. G. van Gompel (2012). Producing Pronouns and Definite Noun Phrases: Do Speakers Use the Addressee's Discourse Model? Cognitive Science 36 (7):1289-1311.
    We report two experiments that investigated the widely held assumption that speakers use the addressee’s discourse model when choosing referring expressions (e.g., Ariel, 1990; Chafe, 1994; Givón, 1983; Prince, 1985), by manipulating whether the addressee could hear the immediately preceding linguistic context. Experiment 1 showed that speakers increased pronoun use (and decreased noun phrase use) when the referent was mentioned in the immediately preceding sentence compared to when it was not, even though the addressee did not hear the preceding (...)
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  41.  21
    Rick Nouwen (2007). On Dependent Pronouns and Dynamic Semantics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (2):123 - 154.
    Within natural language semantics, pronouns are often thought to correspond to variables whose values are contributed by contextual assignment functions. This paper concerns the application of this idea to cases where the antecedent of a pronoun is a plural quantifiers. The paper discusses the modelling of accessibility patterns of quantifier antecedents in a dynamic theory of interpretation. The goal is to reach a semantics of quantificational dependency which yields a fully semantic notion of pronominal accessibility. I argue that certain (...)
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  42.  13
    Min-Joo Kim (2007). Formal Linking in Internally Headed Relatives. Natural Language Semantics 15 (4):279-315.
    This paper aims to clarify and resolve issues surrounding the so-called formal linking problem in interpreting the Internally Headed Relative Clause construction in Korean and Japanese, a problem that has been identified in recent E-type pronominal treatments of the construction (e.g., Hoshi, K. (1995). Structural and interpretive aspects of head-internal and head-external relative clauses. PhD dissertation, University of Rochester; Shimoyama, J. (2001). Wh-constructions in Japanese. PhD dissertation, University of Massachusetts at Amherst). In the literature, this problem refers to the difficulty (...)
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  43.  1
    Yasutada Sudo (2014). Dependent Plural Pronouns with Skolemized Choice Functions. Natural Language Semantics 22 (3):265-297.
    The present paper discusses two interesting phenomena concerning phi-features on plural pronouns: plural pronouns that denote atomic individuals, and plural pronouns with more than one binder. A novel account of these two phenomena is proposed, according to which all occurrences of phi-features are both semantically and morphologically relevant. For such a ‘uniformly semantic account’ of phi-features, dependent plural pronouns constitute a theoretical challenge, while partial binding is more or less straightforwardly accounted for. In order to make sense of the semantic (...)
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  44.  81
    Jose Luis Bermudez (1998). The Paradox of Self-Consciousness. MIT Press.
  45. Anna Szabolcsi, Overt Nominative Subjects in Infinitival Complements Cross-Linguistically: Data, Diagnostics, and Preliminary Analyses. NYU WPL in Syntax, Spring 2009, Ed. By Irwin and Vázquez Rojas. 2009. Http://Linguistics.As.Nyu.Edu/Object/Linguistics.Grad.Nyuwpl#Vol2.
    The typical habitat of overt nominative subjects is in finite clauses. But infinitival complements and infinitival adjuncts are also known to have overt nominative subjects, e.g. in Italian (Rizzi 1982), European Portuguese (Raposo 1987), and Spanish (Torrego 1998, Mensching 2000). The analyses make crucial reference to the movement of Aux or Infl to Comp, and to overt or covert infinitival inflection. This working paper is concerned with a novel set of data that appear to be of a different sort, in (...)
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  46. J. Perry (1979). The Essential Indexical. Noûs 13:3--21.
     
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  47. Pauline I. Jacobson (1980). The Syntax of Crossing Coreference Sentences. Garland Pub..
     
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  48.  3
    Stéphane Chauvier (2001). Kant et l'égologie. Archives de Philosophie 4 (4):647-667.
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  49.  48
    Tomis Kapitan (2006). Indexicality and Self-Awareness. In Uriah Kriegel & Kenneth Williford (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. MIT Press 379--408.
    Self-awareness is commonly expressed by means of indexical expressions, primarily, first- person pronouns like.
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  50.  7
    Dwight van De Vate Jr (1966). Other Minds and the Uses of Language. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (July):250-254.
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