Search results for 'Proper Name' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  45
    Richard Coates (2009). A Strictly Millian Approach to the Definition of the Proper Name. Mind and Language 24 (4):433-444.
    A strictly Millian approach to proper names is defended, i.e. one in which expressions when used properly ('onymically') refer directly, i.e. without the semantic intermediaryship of the words that appear to comprise them. The approach may appear self-evident for names which appear to have no component parts (in current English) but less so for others. Two modes of reference are distinguished for potentially ambiguous expressions such as The Long Island . A consequence of this distinction is to allow a (...)
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  2.  33
    Thomas Sattig (1998). Proper Name Change. Theoria 13 (3):491-501.
    Gareth Evans adduces a case in which a proper name apparently undergoes a change in referent. ‘Madagascar’ was originally the name of a part of Africa. Marco Polo, erroneously thinking he was following native usage, applied the name to an island off the African coast. Today ‘Madagascar’ is the name of that island. Evans argues that this kind of case threatens Kripke ’s picture of naming as developed in Naming and Necessity. According to this picture, (...)
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  3.  12
    Ülle Pärli & Eleonora Rudakovskaja (2002). Juri Lotman on Proper Name. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):577-590.
    The article treats the concept of proper name in Juri Lotman’s semiotics, taking into account also studies in the same field by other authors of the Tartu-Moscow school (V. Ivanov, B. Ogibenin, V. Toporov, B. Uspenski). Focus is laid at three sub-topics: name and myth, name and text, name and artistic creation. One of the sources of treating proper name for both the program article by J. Lotman and B. Uspenski (“Myth — (...) — Culture”), and works by several other semioticians of the Tartu–Moscow school is confidence in the connection between proper name and mythical (a-semiotic) thought: semiosis equals here with nomination. Proper name plurality, different re-namings affirm the continuing importance of mythical thinking in later culture. Proper names (such as personal names, place names) belong, in addition to natural language, also into a certain individual system, forming thus an interlinguistic layer located on the boundary of language. J. Lotmanstresses that art has a specific power of uniting general and proper name (proper name characterized here by individuality, explosiveness). An artistic work is even doubly of proper name character: both the act of creation and its reception are by nature individual and unrepeated. In the opinion of the authors the treatment of proper name by the Tartu-Moscow school contains fruitful and promising standpoints for the analysis of contemporary culture that, however, have been applied unjustifiably little. (shrink)
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  4.  8
    Ülle Pärli (2011). Proper Name as an Object of Semiotic Research. Sign Systems Studies 39 (2-4):197-222.
    The present article is divided into two parts. Its theoretical introductory part takes under scrutiny how proper name has been previously dealt with in linguistics, philosophy and semiotics. The purpose of this short overview is to synthesise different approaches that could be productive in the semiotic analysis of naming practices. Author proposes that proper names should not be seen as a linguistic element or a type of (indexical) signs, but rather as a function that can be (...)
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  5.  15
    William R. Stirton (1994). A Problem Concerning the Definition of `Proper Name'. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):83-89.
    By "proper name" I mean a proper name in Frege's sense, i.e., a singular term. The "problem" mentioned in the title is whether the subject-term of an existential statement can be a proper name. I concentrate on examining some of the existing attempts to define "proper name" and conclude that, whatever answer is given to the question just posed, the authors of these attempts (Dummett, C Wright and B Hale) will have to (...)
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  6. John McDowell (1977). On the Sense and Reference of a Proper Name. Mind 86 (342):159-185.
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  7.  10
    Carl Anders Säfström (2010). The Immigrant has No Proper Name: The Disease of Consensual Democracy Within the Myth of Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):606-617.
    In this article I discuss the role of the immigrant in Swedish society and especially how such a role is construed through what I call the myth of schooling, that is, the normalization of an arbitrary distribution of wealth and power. I relate this myth to the idea of consensual democracy as it is expressed through an implicit idea of what it means to be Swedish. I not only critique the processes through which immigrants are discriminated against or excluded from (...)
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  8. Carine Defoort (2006). Is "Chinese Philosophy" a Proper Name? A Response to Rein Raud. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):625-660.
  9.  55
    Peter Swiggart (1958). Is 'Paradise Lost' a General Name, Proper Name, or What? Analysis 19 (1):4 - 5.
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  10.  2
    Grant Gutheil, Susan A. Gelman, Eileen Klein, Katherine Michos & Kara Kelaita (2008). Preschoolers’ Use of Spatiotemporal History, Appearance, and Proper Name in Determining Individual Identity. Cognition 107 (1):366-380.
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  11.  30
    Ivor Hunt (1958). 'Paradise Lost': General Name, Proper Name, or What? Analysis 19 (1):6 - 7.
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  12. J. Derrida (1987). Otobiographies: Nietzsche and the Politics of the Proper Name. In Harold Bloom (ed.), Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers 127.
     
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  13.  2
    H. S. Eveling (1958). ANALYSIS Problem No. 13 Is Paradise Lost a General Name, Proper Name, or What. Analysis 19 (1):1.
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  14.  2
    I. Hunt (1958). ANALYSIS Problem No. 13 Is Paradise Lost a General Name, Proper Name, or What. Analysis 19 (1):6.
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  15. Sarah Kofman (1986). Tomb for a Proper Name. Substance 49:9-10.
     
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  16. Jacques Derrida (1985). Otobiographies : The Teaching of Nietzsche and the Politics of the Proper Name. In The Ear of the Other: Otobiography, Transference, Translation: Texts and Discussions with Jacques Derrida. University of Nebraska Press
  17.  5
    William Franke (2012). The Place of the Proper Name in the Topographies of the Paradiso. Speculum 87 (4):1089-1124.
    There is an obvious paradox in any attempt to map the topography of Paradise, for Paradise, theologians assure us, is outside of space as well as time. Yet mapping Paradise is what Dante's poem, the Paradiso, attempts to do. For the two preceding realms of the afterlife, hell and purgatory, Dante provides numerous finely articulated descriptions of rigorously ordered regions. And again for Paradise, the variegated states of the souls making up the spiritual order of the realm are expressed very (...)
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  18.  1
    P. Swiggart (1958). ANALYSIS Problem No. 13 Is Paradise Lost a General Name, Proper Name, or What. Erkenntnis 19:4.
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  19.  2
    Chiang Ti (1980). The Proper Name of the Nien Army. Chinese Studies in History 13 (3):70-80.
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  20.  2
    Kristina Peternai Andrić (2009). Sign, Meaning, and Proper Name: Controversial Places in Derrida's Discourse. Filozofska Istrazivanja 29 (3):525-541.
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  21.  1
    Clyde Pax (1988). Homo Viator as a Proper Name of the Human Person. Philosophy Today 32 (4):338-345.
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  22. D. G. Hall (2009). Early Proper Name Learning: Implications for a Theory of Lexical Development. Mind and Language 24:404-432.
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  23. P. Sousedik (2001). Tichy's Criticism of the Causal Theory of the Proper Name. Filosoficky Casopis 49 (5):745-752.
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  24. Mark Textor (2010). Proper Names and Practices: On Reference Without Referents. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):105-118.
    This is review essay of Mark Sainsbury's Reference without Referents. Its main part is a critical discussion of Sainsbury's proposal for the individuation of proper name using practices.
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  25.  19
    Hans Kamp (2015). Using Proper Names as Intermediaries Between Labelled Entity Representations. Erkenntnis 80 (2):263-312.
    This paper studies the uses of proper names within a communication-theoretic setting, looking at both the conditions that govern the use of a name by a speaker and those involved in the correct interpretation of the name by her audience. The setting in which these conditions are investigated is provided by an extension of Discourse Representation Theory, MSDRT, in which mental states are represented as combinations of propositional attitudes and entity representations . The first half of (...)
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  26.  74
    Mark Textor (2007). Frege's Theory of Hybrid Proper Names Developed and Defended. Mind 116 (464):947-982.
    Does the English demonstrative pronoun 'that' (including complex demonstratives of the form 'that F') have sense and reference? Unlike many other philosophers of language, Frege answers with a resounding 'No'. He held that the bearer of sense and reference is a so-called 'hybrid proper name' (Künne) that contains the demonstrative pronoun and specific circumstances of utterance such as glances and acts of pointing. In this paper I provide arguments for the thesis that demonstratives are hybrid (...) names. After outlining why Frege held the hybrid proper name view, I will defend it against recent criticism, and argue that it is superior to views that take demonstrative pronouns to be the bearer of semantic properties. (shrink)
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  27.  5
    Stephen Wheeler (2009). Nomen Omen (J.) Booth, (R.) Maltby (Edd.) What's in a Name? The Significance of Proper Names in Classical Latin Literature. Pp. X + 196, Ills. Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, 2006. Cased, £45. ISBN: 978-1-905125-09-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):455-.
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  28.  31
    Dolf Rami (2014). The Use-Conditional Indexical Conception of Proper Names. Philosophical Studies 168 (1):119-150.
    In this essay I will defend a novel version of the indexical view on proper names. According to this version, proper names have a relatively sparse truth-conditional meaning that is represented by their rigid content and indexical character, but a relatively rich use-conditional meaning, which I call the (contextual) constraint of a proper name. Firstly, I will provide a brief outline of my favoured indexical view on names in contrast to other indexical views (...)
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  29. John R. Searle (1983). Intentionality: An Essay in the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    John Searle's Speech Acts and Expression and Meaning developed a highly original and influential approach to the study of language. But behind both works lay the assumption that the philosophy of language is in the end a branch of the philosophy of the mind: speech acts are forms of human action and represent just one example of the mind's capacity to relate the human organism to the world. The present book is concerned with these biologically fundamental capacities, (...)
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  30. Ora Matushansky (2008). On the Linguistic Complexity of Proper Names. Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (5):573-627.
    While proper names in argument positions have received a lot of attention, this cannot be said about proper names in the naming construction, as in “Call me Al”. I argue that in a number of more or less familiar languages the syntax of naming constructions is such that proper names there have to be analyzed as predicates, whose content mentions the name itself (cf. “quotation theories”). If proper names can enter syntax as predicates, then in (...)
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  31. Pierre Baumann (2010). Are Proper Names Rigid Designators? Axiomathes 20 (2-3):333-346.
    A widely accepted thesis in the philosophy of language is that natural language proper names are rigid designators, and that they are so de jure, or as a matter of the “semantic rules of the language.” This paper questions this claim, arguing that rigidity cannot be plausibly construed as a property of name types and that the alternative, rigidity construed as a property of tokens, means that they cannot be considered rigid de jure; rigidity in this case (...)
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  32. Michael McKinsey (2010). Understanding Proper Names. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (4):325-354.
    There is a fairly general consensus that names are Millian (or Russellian) genuine terms, that is, are singular terms whose sole semantic function is to introduce a referent into the propositions expressed by sentences containing the term. This answers the question as to what sort of proposition is expressed by use of sentences containing names. But there is a second serious semantic problem about proper names, that of how the referents of proper names are determined. This (...)
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  33.  83
    Stavroula Glezakos (2009). Public Proper Names, Idiolectal Identifying Descriptions. Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (3):317-326.
    Direct reference theorists tell us that proper names have no semantic value other than their bearers, and that the connection between name and bearer is unmediated by descriptions or descriptive information. And yet, these theorists also acknowledge that we produce our name-containing utterances with descriptions on our minds. After arguing that direct reference proponents have failed to give descriptions their due, I show that appeal to speaker-associated descriptions is required if the direct reference portrayal of speakers (...)
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  34.  16
    Ignacio Verdú Berganza (1996). Introducción al problema de la libertad en la obra de Thomas Bradwardine. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 1 (8):113-127.
    The paper examines Frege’s argument based on the problem of cognitive value. This argument is opposed to Millian semantics on proper names and sustains Frege’s owns proposal. I point out a general flaw in the argument and elucidate the difficulty embodied by the ‘Paderewski’ example. I also defend the relevance of the example from a contention suggested in a recent paper by David Sosa.
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  35.  3
    Ignacio Vicario Arjona (2002). “Paderewski” y el problema del valor cognoscitivo en Frege. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 27 (2):361-387.
    The paper examines Frege’s argument based on the problem of cognitive value. This argument is opposed to Millian semantics on proper names and sustains Frege’s owns proposal. I point out a general flaw in the argument and elucidate the difficulty embodied by the ‘Paderewski’ example. I also defend the relevance of the example from a contention suggested in a recent paper by David Sosa.
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  36.  49
    Robin Jeshion (2015). Referentialism and Predicativism About Proper Names. Erkenntnis 80 (S2):363-404.
    Overview The debate over the semantics of proper names has, of late, heated up, focusing on the relative merits of referentialism and predicativism. Referentialists maintain that the semantic function of proper names is to designate individuals. They hold that a proper name, as it occurs in a sentence in a context of use, refers to a specific individual that is its referent and has just that individual as its semantic content, its contribution to (...)
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  37. Ian Proops (2011). Russell on Substitutivity and the Abandonment of Propositions. Philosophical Review 120 (2):151-205.
    The paper argues that philosophers commonly misidentify the substitutivity principle involved in Russell’s puzzle about substitutivity in “On Denoting”. This matters because when that principle is properly identified the puzzle becomes considerably sharper and more interesting than it is often taken to be. This article describes both the puzzle itself and Russell's solution to it, which involves resources beyond the theory of descriptions. It then explores the epistemological and metaphysical consequences of that solution. One such consequence, it argues, is that (...)
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  38. Ian Proops (2011). Logical Atomism in Russell and Wittgenstein. In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. OUP Oxford
    An essay examining logical atomism as it arises in Russell and the early Wittgenstein.
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  39.  22
    Kent Bach (2015). The Predicate View of Proper Names. Philosophy Compass 10 (11):772-784.
    The Millian view that the meaning of a proper name is simply its referent has long been popular among philosophers of language. It might even be deemed the orthodox view, despite its well-known difficulties. Fregean and Russellian alternatives, though widely discussed, are much less popular. The Predicate View has not even been taken seriously, at least until fairly recently, but finally, it is receiving the attention it deserves. It says that a name expresses the property of bearing (...)
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  40. Ian Proops (2004). Wittgenstein on the Substance of the World. European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):106–126.
    The *Tractatus* contains an argument that there are simple, necessarily existent objects, which, being simple, are suited to be the referents of the names occuring in the final analysis of propositions. The argument is perplexing in its own right, but also for its invocation of the notion of "substance". I argue that if one locates Wittgenstein's conception of substance in the Kantian tradition to which his talk of "substance" alludes, what emerges is an argument that is very nearly--but not quite--cogent.
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  41.  91
    Gregory McCulloch (1989). The Game of the Name: Introducing Logic, Language, and Mind. Oxford University Press.
    This introduction to modern work in analytic philosophy uses the example of the proper name to give a clear explanation of the logical theories of Gottlob Frege, and explain the application of his ideas to ordinary language. McCulloch then shows how meaning is rooted in the philosophy of mind and the question of intentionality, and looks at the ways in which thought can be "about" individual material objects.
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  42.  73
    Claudio F. Costa (2011). A Meta-Descriptivist Theory of Proper Names. Ratio 24 (3):259-281.
    This paper proposes a new, stronger version of the cluster theory of proper names. It introduces a meta-identifying rule that can establish a cluster's main descriptions and explain how they must be satisfied in order to allow the application of a proper name. At the same time, it preserves some main insights of the causal-historical view. With the resulting rule we can not only give a more detailed reply to the counter-examples to descriptivism, but also explain the (...)
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  43.  26
    Mark Textor & Dolf Rami (2015). Proper Names: Philosophical and Linguistic Perspectives. Erkenntnis 80 (2):191-194.
    Proper names play an important role in our understanding of linguistic ‘aboutness’ or reference. For instance, the name-bearer relation is a good candidate for the paradigm of the reference relation: it provides us with our initial grip on this relation and controls our thinking about it. For this and other reasons proper names have been at the center of philosophical attention. However, proper names are as controversial as they are conceptually fundamental. Since Kripke’s seminal lectures Naming (...)
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  44. Osamu Kiritani (2008). Proper Names and Local Information. Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (3):281-284.
    Evolutionary theory has recently been applied to language. The aim of this paper is to contribute to such an evolutionary approach to language. I argue that Kripke’s causal account of proper names, from an ecological point of view, captures the information carried by uses of a proper name, which is that a certain object is referred to. My argument appeals to Millikan’s concept of local information, which captures information about the environment useful for an organism.
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  45.  18
    M. Fletcher Maumus (2012). Proper Names. Polish Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):41-56.
    Principally under the influence of Saul Kripke (1972), philosophical semantics since the closing decades of 20th century has been dominated by thephenomenon Nathan Salmon (1986) aptly dubbed Direct Reference “mania.” Accordingly, it is now practically orthodox to hold that the meanings of proper names are entirely exhausted by their referents and devoid of any descriptive content. The return to a purely referential semantics of names has, nevertheless, coincided with a resurgence of some of the very puzzles that motivated description (...)
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  46.  23
    M. Fletcher Maumus (2012). Proper Names. Polish Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):41-56.
    Principally under the influence of Saul Kripke (1972), philosophical semantics since the closing decades of 20th century has been dominated by thephenomenon Nathan Salmon (1986) aptly dubbed Direct Reference “mania.” Accordingly, it is now practically orthodox to hold that the meanings of proper names are entirely exhausted by their referents and devoid of any descriptive content. The return to a purely referential semantics of names has, nevertheless, coincided with a resurgence of some of the very puzzles that motivated description (...)
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  47.  12
    Francesco Orilia (2000). The Property-Theoretical, Performative-Nominalistic Theory of Proper Names. Dialectica 54 (3):155–176.
    This paper embeds a theory of proper names in a general approach to singular reference based on type‐free property theory. It is proposed that a proper name “N” is a sortal common noun whose meaning is essentially tied to the linguistic type “N”. Moreover, “N” can be singularly referring insofar as it is elliptical for a definite description of the form the “N” Following Montague, the meaning of a definite description is taken to be a property of (...)
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  48.  16
    Julie Brumberg-Chaumont (2013). The Role of Discrete Terms in the Theory of the Properties of Terms. Vivarium 51 (1-4):169-204.
  49.  50
    M. D'Cruz (2000). A Theory of Ordinary Proper Names. Mind 109 (436):721-756.
    It is widely believed that the semantic function of an ordinary proper name (e.g. 'Aristotle') is inexplicable in terms of the semantic function of an ordinary definite description (e.g. 'the last great ancient philosopher'), given a Russellian analysis of the latter. This paper questions this belief by suggesting a possible semantic explication. In brief, I propose that an ordinary proper name is a mere placeholder for an arbitrary ordinary definite description true of a given individual. The (...)
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  50.  8
    Henri Lauener (1994). How to Use Proper Names. Grazer Philosophische Studien 49:101-119.
    According to relativized transcendentalism, the meaning of expressions, consisting in their intension and extension, is provided by a set of (syntactical, semantical and pragmatical) rules which prescribe their correct use in a context. We interpret a linguistic system by fixing a domain (of the values of the variables) and by assigning exactly one object to each individual constant and n-tuples of objects to predicates. The theory says that proper names have a purely referential role and that their meaning is (...)
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