Search results for 'Proper Name-Unsing Practice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark Textor (2010). Proper Names and Practices: On Reference Without Referents. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):105-118.score: 718.0
    This is review essay of Mark Sainsbury's Reference without Referents. Its main part is a critical discussion of Sainsbury's proposal for the individuation of proper name using practices.
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  2. Ülle Pärli (2011). Proper Name as an Object of Semiotic Research. Sign Systems Studies 39 (2-4):197-222.score: 288.0
    The present article is divided into two parts. Its theoretical introductory part takes under scrutiny how proper name has been previously dealt with in linguistics, philosophy and semiotics. The purpose of this short overview is to synthesise different approaches that could be productive in the semiotic analysis of naming practices. Author proposes that proper names should not be seen as a linguistic element or a type of (indexical) signs, but rather as a function that can be carried by (...)
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  3. Michael McKinsey (2010). Understanding Proper Names. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (4):325-354.score: 219.0
    There is a fairly general consensus that names are Millian (or Russellian) genuine terms, that is, are singular terms whose sole semantic function is to introduce a referent into the propositions expressed by sentences containing the term. This answers the question as to what sort of proposition is expressed by use of sentences containing names. But there is a second serious semantic problem about proper names, that of how the referents of proper names are determined. This is the (...)
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  4. Weixiang Ding (2010). Taking on Proper Appearance and Putting It Into Practice: Two Different Systems of Effort in Song and Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):326-351.score: 192.0
    Both jianxing 践形 (taking on proper appearance) and jianxing 践行 (putting into practice) were concepts coined by Confucians before the Qin Dynasty. They largely referred to similar things. But because the Daxue 大学 ( Great Learning ) was listed as one of the Sishu 四书 (The Four Books) during the Song Dynasty, different explanations and trends in terms of the Great Learning resulted in taking on proper appearance and putting into practice becoming two different systems of (...)
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  5. Ding Weixiang (2010). Taking on Proper Appearance and Putting It Into Practice: Two Different Systems of Effort in Song and Ming Neo-Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):326-351.score: 168.0
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  6. Richard Coates (2009). A Strictly Millian Approach to the Definition of the Proper Name. Mind and Language 24 (4):433-444.score: 162.0
    A strictly Millian approach to proper names is defended, i.e. one in which expressions when used properly ('onymically') refer directly, i.e. without the semantic intermediaryship of the words that appear to comprise them. The approach may appear self-evident for names which appear to have no component parts (in current English) but less so for others. Two modes of reference are distinguished for potentially ambiguous expressions such as The Long Island . A consequence of this distinction is to allow a (...)
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  7. Thomas Sattig (1998). Proper Name Change. Theoria 13 (3):491-501.score: 162.0
    Gareth Evans (1973) adduces a case in which a proper name apparently undergoes a change in referent. ‘Madagascar’ was originally the name of a part of Africa. Marco Polo, erroneously thinking he was following native usage, applied the name to an island off the African coast. Today ‘Madagascar’ is the name of that island. Evans argues that this kind of case threatens Kripke’s picture of naming as developed in Naming and Necessity. According to this picture, (...)
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  8. William R. Stirton (1994). A Problem Concerning the Definition of `Proper Name'. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):83-89.score: 162.0
    By "proper name" I mean a proper name in Frege's sense, i.e., a singular term. The "problem" mentioned in the title is whether the subject-term of an existential statement can be a proper name. I concentrate on examining some of the existing attempts to define "proper name" and conclude that, whatever answer is given to the question just posed, the authors of these attempts (Dummett, C Wright and B Hale) will have to modify some of their (...)
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  9. Ülle Pärli & Eleonora Rudakovskaja (2002). Juri Lotman on Proper Name. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):577-590.score: 162.0
    The article treats the concept of proper name in Juri Lotman’s semiotics, taking into account also studies in the same field by other authors of the Tartu-Moscow school (V. Ivanov, B. Ogibenin, V. Toporov, B. Uspenski). Focus is laid at three sub-topics: name and myth, name and text, name and artistic creation. One of the sources of treating proper name for both the program article by J. Lotman and B. Uspenski (“Myth — Name — Culture”), and works by (...)
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  10. Mark Textor (2007). Frege's Theory of Hybrid Proper Names Developed and Defended. Mind 116 (464):947-982.score: 146.0
    Does the English demonstrative pronoun 'that' (including complex demonstratives of the form 'that F') have sense and reference? Unlike many other philosophers of language, Frege answers with a resounding 'No'. He held that the bearer of sense and reference is a so-called 'hybrid proper name' (Künne) that contains the demonstrative pronoun and specific circumstances of utterance such as glances and acts of pointing. In this paper I provide arguments for the thesis that demonstratives are hybrid proper names. After (...)
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  11. Dolf Rami (2014). The Use-Conditional Indexical Conception of Proper Names. Philosophical Studies 168 (1):119-150.score: 142.0
    In this essay I will defend a novel version of the indexical view on proper names. According to this version, proper names have a relatively sparse truth-conditional meaning that is represented by their rigid content and indexical character, but a relatively rich use-conditional meaning, which I call the (contextual) constraint of a proper name. Firstly, I will provide a brief outline of my favoured indexical view on names in contrast to other indexical views proposed in the relevant (...)
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  12. Carl Anders Säfström (2010). The Immigrant has No Proper Name: The Disease of Consensual Democracy Within the Myth of Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):606-617.score: 141.0
    In this article I discuss the role of the immigrant in Swedish society and especially how such a role is construed through what I call the myth of schooling, that is, the normalization of an arbitrary distribution of wealth and power. I relate this myth to the idea of consensual democracy as it is expressed through an implicit idea of what it means to be Swedish. I not only critique the processes through which immigrants are discriminated against or excluded from (...)
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  13. John McDowell (1977). On the Sense and Reference of a Proper Name. Mind 86 (342):159-185.score: 135.0
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  14. Carine Defoort (2006). Is "Chinese Philosophy" a Proper Name? A Response to Rein Raud. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):625-660.score: 135.0
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  15. Ivor Hunt (1958). 'Paradise Lost': General Name, Proper Name, or What? Analysis 19 (1):6 - 7.score: 135.0
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  16. William Franke (2012). The Place of the Proper Name in the Topographies of the Paradiso. Speculum 87 (4):1089-1124.score: 135.0
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  17. Grant Gutheil, Susan A. Gelman, Eileen Klein, Katherine Michos & Kara Kelaita (2008). Preschoolers' Use of Spatiotemporal History, Appearance, and Proper Name in Determining Individual Identity. Cognition 107 (1):366-380.score: 135.0
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  18. Kristina Peternai Andrić (2009). Sign, Meaning, and Proper Name: Controversial Places in Derrida's Discourse. Filozofska Istraživanja 29 (3):525-541.score: 135.0
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  19. Chiang Ti (1980). The Proper Name of the Nien Army. Chinese Studies in History 13 (3):70-80.score: 135.0
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  20. J. Derrida (1987). Otobiographies: Nietzsche and the Politics of the Proper Name. In Harold Bloom (ed.), Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers. 127.score: 135.0
     
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  21. Jacques Derrida (1985). Otobiographies : The Teaching of Nietzsche and the Politics of the Proper Name. In , The Ear of the Other: Otobiography, Transference, Translation: Texts and Discussions with Jacques Derrida. University of Nebraska Press.score: 135.0
  22. D. G. Hall (2009). Early Proper Name Learning: Implications for a Theory of Lexical Development. Mind and Language 24:404-432.score: 135.0
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  23. Sarah Kofman (1986). Tomb for a Proper Name. Substance 49:9-10.score: 135.0
     
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  24. Clyde Pax (1988). Homo Viator as a Proper Name of the Human Person. Philosophy Today 32 (4):338-345.score: 135.0
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  25. P. Sousedik (2001). Tichy's Criticism of the Causal Theory of the Proper Name. Filosoficky Casopis 49 (5):745-752.score: 135.0
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  26. Peter Swiggart (1958). Is 'Paradise Lost' a General Name, Proper Name, or What? Analysis 19 (1):4 - 5.score: 135.0
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  27. M. Fletcher Maumus (2012). Proper Names. Polish Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):41-56.score: 134.0
    Principally under the influence of Saul Kripke (1972), philosophical semantics since the closing decades of 20th century has been dominated by thephenomenon Nathan Salmon (1986) aptly dubbed Direct Reference “mania.” Accordingly, it is now practically orthodox to hold that the meanings of proper names are entirely exhausted by their referents and devoid of any descriptive content. The return to a purely referential semantics of names has, nevertheless, coincided with a resurgence of some of the very puzzles that motivated description (...)
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  28. Imogen Dickie (2011). How Proper Names Refer. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):43-78.score: 132.0
    This paper develops a new account of reference-fixing for proper names. The account is built around an intuitive claim about reference fixing: the claim that I am a participant in a practice of using α to refer to o only if my uses of α are constrained by the representationally relevant ways it is possible for o to behave. §I raises examples that suggest that a right account of how proper names refer should incorporate this claim. §II (...)
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  29. Eric Thomas Weber (2008). Proper Names and Persons: Peirce's Semiotic Consideration of Proper Names. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (2):pp. 346-362.score: 132.0
    Charles S. Peirce’s theory of proper names bears helpful insights for how we might think about his understanding of persons. Persons, on his view, are continuities, not static objects. I argue that Peirce’s notion of the legisign, particularly proper names, sheds light on the habitual and conventional elements of what it means to be a person. In this paper, I begin with an account of what philosophers of language have said about proper names in order to distinguish (...)
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  30. Sandra J. Tanenbaum (2006). Evidence by Any Other Name. Commentary on Tonelli (2006), Integrating Evidence Into Clinical Practice: An Alternative to Evidence‐Based Approaches. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):273-276.score: 126.0
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  31. S. J. Tannebaum (2006). Evidence by Any Other Name. Commentary on Tonelli (2006). Integrating Evidence Into Clinical Practice: An Alternative to Evidence-Based Approaches. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):273-276.score: 126.0
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  32. Stephen Wheeler (2009). Nomen Omen (J.) Booth, (R.) Maltby (Edd.) What's in a Name? The Significance of Proper Names in Classical Latin Literature. Pp. X + 196, Ills. Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, 2006. Cased, £45. ISBN: 978-1-905125-09-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):455-.score: 125.0
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  33. David L. Calof (1998). Notes From a Practice Under Siege: Harassment, Defamation, and Intimidation in the Name of Science. Ethics and Behavior 8 (2):161 – 187.score: 122.0
    I have practiced psychotherapy, family therapy, and hypnotherapy for over 25 years without a single board complaint or lawsuit by a client. For over 3 years, however, a group of proponents of the false memory syndrome (FMS) hypothesis, including members, officials, and supporters of the False Memory Syndrome Foundation, Inc., have waged a multimodal campaign of harassment and defamation directed against me, my clinical clients, my staff, my family, and others connected to me. I have neither treated these harassers or (...)
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  34. Waddah N. Nasr (1992). On the Proper Function of the Moral Philosopher: Kant and Rawls on Theory and Practice. Metaphilosophy 23 (1-2):172-179.score: 120.0
  35. Martin Laird (2005). The “Open Country Whose Name is Prayer”: Apophasis, Deconstruction, and Contemplative Practice. Modern Theology 21 (1):141-155.score: 120.0
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  36. Philip C. Kendall & Cynthia Suveg (2008). Treatment Outcome Studies with Children: Principles of Proper Practice. Ethics and Behavior 18 (2 & 3):215 – 233.score: 120.0
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  37. Pierre Baumann (2010). Are Proper Names Rigid Designators? Axiomathes 20 (2-3):333-346.score: 116.0
    A widely accepted thesis in the philosophy of language is that natural language proper names are rigid designators, and that they are so de jure, or as a matter of the “semantic rules of the language.” This paper questions this claim, arguing that rigidity cannot be plausibly construed as a property of name types and that the alternative, rigidity construed as a property of tokens, means that they cannot be considered rigid de jure; rigidity in this case must be (...)
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  38. Ora Matushansky (2008). On the Linguistic Complexity of Proper Names. Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (5):573-627.score: 116.0
    While proper names in argument positions have received a lot of attention, this cannot be said about proper names in the naming construction, as in “Call me Al”. I argue that in a number of more or less familiar languages the syntax of naming constructions is such that proper names there have to be analyzed as predicates, whose content mentions the name itself (cf. “quotation theories”). If proper names can enter syntax as predicates, then in argument (...)
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  39. Stavroula Glezakos (2009). Public Proper Names, Idiolectal Identifying Descriptions. Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (3):317-326.score: 116.0
    Direct reference theorists tell us that proper names have no semantic value other than their bearers, and that the connection between name and bearer is unmediated by descriptions or descriptive information. And yet, these theorists also acknowledge that we produce our name-containing utterances with descriptions on our minds. After arguing that direct reference proponents have failed to give descriptions their due, I show that appeal to speaker-associated descriptions is required if the direct reference portrayal of speakers wielding and referring (...)
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  40. Agnieszka Konopka Antje S. Meyer, Linda Wheeldon, Femke van der Meulen (2012). Effects of Speech Rate and Practice on the Allocation of Visual Attention in Multiple Object Naming. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 96.0
    Earlier studies had shown that speakers naming several objects typically look at each object until they have retrieved the phonological form of its name and therefore look longer at objects with long names than at objects with shorter names. We examined whether this tight eye-to-speech coordination was maintained at different speech rates and after increasing amounts of practice. Participants named the same set of objects with monosyllabic or disyllabic names on up to 20 successive trials. In Experiment 1, they (...)
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  41. Emmanuel Lévinas (1996). Proper Names. Stanford University Press.score: 94.5
    Combining elements from Heidegger’s philosophy of “being-in-the-world” and the tradition of Jewish theology, Levinas has evolved a new type of ethics based on a concept of “the Other” in two different but complementary aspects. He describes his encounters with those philosophers and literary authors (most of them his contemporaries) whose writings have most significantly contributed to the construction of his own philosophy of “Otherness”: Agnon, Buber, Celan, Delhomme, Derrida, Jabès, Kierkegaard, Lacroix, Laporte, Picard, Proust, Van Breda, Wahl, and, most notably, (...)
     
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  42. Claudio F. Costa (2011). A Meta-Descriptivist Theory of Proper Names. Ratio 24 (3):259-281.score: 92.0
    This paper proposes a new, stronger version of the cluster theory of proper names. It introduces a meta-identifying rule that can establish a cluster's main descriptions and explain how they must be satisfied in order to allow the application of a proper name. At the same time, it preserves some main insights of the causal-historical view. With the resulting rule we can not only give a more detailed reply to the counter-examples to descriptivism, but also explain the informative (...)
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  43. Osamu Kiritani (2008). Proper Names and Local Information. Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (3):281-284.score: 92.0
    Evolutionary theory has recently been applied to language. The aim of this paper is to contribute to such an evolutionary approach to language. I argue that Kripke’s causal account of proper names, from an ecological point of view, captures the information carried by uses of a proper name, which is that a certain object is referred to. My argument appeals to Millikan’s concept of local information, which captures information about the environment useful for an organism.
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  44. M. D'Cruz (2000). A Theory of Ordinary Proper Names. Mind 109 (436):721-756.score: 92.0
    It is widely believed that the semantic function of an ordinary proper name (e.g. 'Aristotle') is inexplicable in terms of the semantic function of an ordinary definite description (e.g. 'the last great ancient philosopher'), given a Russellian analysis of the latter. This paper questions this belief by suggesting a possible semantic explication. In brief, I propose that an ordinary proper name is a mere placeholder for an arbitrary ordinary definite description true of a given individual. The proposal is (...)
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  45. Paul Bloom, Preschoolers Are Sensitive to the Speaker's Knowledge When Learning Proper Names.score: 92.0
    Unobservable properties that are specific to individuals, such as their proper names, can only be known by people who are familiar with those individuals. Do young children utilize this “familiarity principle” when learning language? Experiment 1 tested whether forty-eight 2- to 4-year-old children were able to determine the referent of a proper name such as “Jessie” based on the knowledge that the speaker was familiar with one individual but unfamiliar with the other. Even 2-year-olds successfully identified Jessie as (...)
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  46. Barry Miller (1973). Proper Names and Suppositio Personalis. Analysis 33 (4):133 - 137.score: 92.0
    The question is whether a proper name (e.G., "tom") may be used in a way that parallels that of "man" in "man is a species". "tom is an individual" is the answer proposed, With "individual" functioning as a second order term. A number of difficulties are resolved by showing that "tom is an individual" may be rendered as "a man is (in english) called 'tom' and is so constituted that only he may without ambiguity be called 'tom'. This shows (...)
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  47. John David Stone (1982). Proper Names as Connoting Expressions. Southern Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):233-239.score: 92.0
    Close attention to the meanings of certain sentences--Counterfactual-Identity sentences--Reveals that no theory in which proper names are simple designators can be a complete and correct semantics of english. An account of connotation is outlined according to which connotation varies with the linguistic environment and with the context of utterance: this accounts for the fact that no proper name is synonymous with a cluster of descriptions.
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  48. Henri Lauener (1994). How to Use Proper Names. Grazer Philosophische Studien 49:101-119.score: 92.0
    According to relativized transcendentalism, the meaning of expressions, consisting in their intension and extension, is provided by a set of (syntactical, semantical and pragmatical) rules which prescribe their correct use in a context. We interpret a linguistic system by fixing a domain (of the values of the variables) and by assigning exactly one object to each individual constant and n-tuples of objects to predicates. The theory says that proper names have a purely referential role and that their meaning is (...)
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  49. B. Abbott (2002). Discussion Note: Definiteness and Proper Names: Some Bad News for the Description Theory. Journal of Semantics 19 (2):191-201.score: 90.0
    This paper addresses some data put forward by Geurts (1997) in support of his metalinguistic or quotation theory of proper names, according to which a name N means ‘the individual named N’. The data illustrate ten linguistic behaviours claimed to be shared by proper names and definite descriptions. I argue that in some cases the behaviours have a common explanation which is based on a property independent of Geurts' analysis, and that in the remaining cases the behaviours are (...)
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