Search results for 'Property History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. M. Hickford (2006). 'Decidedly the Most Interesting Savages on the Globe': An Approach to the Intellectual History of Maori Property Rights, 1837-53. History of Political Thought 27 (1):122-167.score: 150.0
    This article contends that the intellectual history of developing British imperial policy towards indigenous peoples' property rights to land in the mid-nineteenth century is best approached through seeing policy as made in the context of two intellectual vocabularies that were conjoined: the stadial theory of history and the law of nations. New Zealand provides an example of these languages in contestable play between the 1830s and 1853 at a time when the expanding British Empire as a whole (...)
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  2. Jean Axelrad Cahan (1994). The Concept of Property in Marx's Theory of History: A Defense of the Autonomy of the Socioeconomic Base. Science and Society 58 (4):392 - 414.score: 144.0
    This paper seeks a new perspective on a long-standing ambiguity in historical materialism. The term "property," its apparent inclusion in both the economic base and the politicolegal superstructure in Marx's schema, and the consequent difficulty of asserting a causal connection between base and superstructure, are seen as deriving from intellectual influences on the young Marx. These influences conveyed certain central ideas from the history of Roman law and its treatment of property. Some implications for Marxist theory are (...)
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  3. Christopher Pierson (2013). Just Property: A History in the Latin West. Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law. Oup Oxford.score: 126.0
    Traces the complex lineages of thinking about private property from ancient to modern times. It challenges a number of deep-seated assumptions we make about the incontestability of private property by building a careful and extended account of where these assumptions came from.
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  4. Wolfgang Geierhos (1979). Karl Marx on Forms of Pre-Capitalist Production. Comparative Studies on the History of Landed Property 1879–80. Philosophy and History 12 (2):203-205.score: 126.0
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  5. Ben Jackson (2012). Property-Owning Democracy: A Short History. In T. Williamson (ed.), Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 126.0
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  6. C. A. Herbst (1939). A History of the Legal Incorporation of Catholic Church Property in the United States (1784-1932). Thought 14 (4):671-672.score: 120.0
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  7. P. A. Brunt (1977). Roman Investment in Property M. I. Finley: Studies in Roman Property by the Cambridge University Research Seminar in Ancient History. Pp. Vii + 212. Cambridge: University Press, 1976. Cloth, £3·75. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (02):231-233.score: 120.0
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  8. Cathy Caruth (2002). The Claims of the Dead: History, Haunted Property, and the Law. Critical Inquiry 28 (2):419.score: 120.0
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  9. F. L. Cheyette (1986). R. B. Dobson, Ed., The Church, Politics and Patronage in the Fifteenth Century. Gloucester, Eng.: Alan Sutton; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1984. Pp. 245. $25.Tony Pollard, Ed., Property and Politics: Essays in Later Medieval English History. Gloucester, Eng.: Alan Sutton; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1984. Pp. 204; Table, 2 Maps. $25. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (2):497-497.score: 120.0
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  10. Theresa Coletti (2003). Jennifer Summit, Lost Property: The Woman Writer and English Literary History, 1380–1589. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2000. Pp. X, 274; 10 Black-and-White Figures. $45 (Cloth); $18 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (1):271-273.score: 120.0
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  11. Antoine Barnave (1971). Power, Property, and History. New York,Harper & Row.score: 120.0
     
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  12. T. N. Bisson (1991). Emily Zack Tabuteau, Transfers of Property in Eleventh-Century Norman Law.(Studies in Legal History.) Chapel Hill, NC, and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1988. Pp. X, 445; 6 Tables. $49.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (3):698-700.score: 120.0
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  13. Graham P. Cornish, Michael Gorman & Gordon Graham (2004). Book Reviews of the No Trespassing: Authorship, Intellectual Property Rights, and the Boundaries of Globalization, Library: An Unquiet History, The Spinster and the Prophet. [REVIEW] Logos 15 (4):219-223.score: 120.0
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  14. Ann-Marie Knoblauch (2004). Archaeology as the History of Cultural Property. Classical World 97 (2).score: 120.0
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  15. B. M. O'Connell (1998). Terraforming History: The Virtual Reconstruction of Property. Social Epistemology 12:351-361.score: 120.0
     
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  16. Stephen Buckle (1991). Natural Law and the Theory of Property: Grotius to Hume. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    In this book, Buckle provides a historical perspective on the political philosophies of Locke and Hume, arguing that there are continuities in the development of seventeenth and eighteenth-century political theory which have often gone unrecognized. He begins with a detailed exposition of Grotius's and Pufendorf's modern natural law theory, focussing on their accounts of the nature of natural law, human sociability, the development of forms of property, and the question of slavery. He then shows that Locke's political theory takes (...)
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  17. Matthew H. Kramer (1997). John Locke and the Origins of Private Property: Philosophical Explorations of Individualism, Community, and Equality. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    John Locke's labor theory of property is one of the seminal ideas of political philosophy and served to establish its author's reputation as one of the leading social and political thinkers of all time. Through it Locke addressed many of his most pressing concerns, and earned a reputation as an outstanding spokesman for political individualism - a reputation that lingers widely despite some partial challenges that have been raised in recent years. In this major new study Matthew Kramer offers (...)
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  18. Hugh Breakey (2011). Two Concepts of Property: Ownership of Things and Property in Activities. Philosophical Forum 42 (3):239-265.score: 84.0
    I argue there is a distinct and integrated property-concept applying directly, not to things, but to actions. This concept of Property in Activities describes a determinate ethico-political relation to a particular activity – a relation that may (but equally may not) subsequently effect a wide variety of relations to some thing. The relation with the activity is fixed and primary, and any ensuing relations with things are variable and derivative. Property in Activities illuminates many of the vexing (...)
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  19. Geoff Kennedy (2011). Citizens to Lords: A Social History of Western Political Thought From Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Historical Materialism 19 (1):304-318.score: 78.0
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  20. Thom Brooks (2013/2009). Hegel's Political Philosophy: A Systematic Reading of the Philosophy of Right. Edinburgh University Press.score: 72.0
    A new edition of the first systematic reading of Hegel's political philosophy Elements of the Philosophy of Right is widely acknowledged to be one of the most important works in the history of political philosophy. This is the first book on the subject to take Hegel's system of speculative philosophy seriously as an important component of any robust understanding of this text. Key Features •Sets out the difference between 'systematic' and 'non-systematic' readings of Philosophy of Right •Outlines the unique (...)
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  21. John Dunn (1996). The History of Political Theory and Other Essays. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    In this collection of recent essays (several appearing in English for the first time), John Dunn brings his characteristically acute and penetrative insight to a wide range of political issues. In the first essay, 'The history of political theory', Professor Dunn argues for the importance of a historical perspective in the study of political thought. Other pieces engage with central concepts of political philosophy such as obligation, trust, freedom of conscience and property. A group of studies tackle specific (...)
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  22. J. H. Burns (ed.) (1988). The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C. 350-C. 1450. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    This volume offers a comprehensive and authoritative account of the history of a complex and varied body of ideas over a period of more than one thousand years. A work of both synthesis and assessment, The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought presents the results of several decades of critical scholarship in the field, and reflects in its breadth of enquiry precisely that diversity of focus that characterized the medieval sense of the "political," preoccupied with universality at some (...)
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  23. David Ellerman (1992). Property and Contract in Economics: The Case for Economic Democracy. Blackwell.score: 66.0
    From a pre-publication review by the late Austrian economist, Don Lavoie, of George Mason University: -/- "The book's radical re-interpretation of property and contract is, I think, among the most powerful critiques of mainstream economics ever developed. It undermines the neoclassical way of thinking about property by articulating a theory of inalienable rights, and constructs out of this perspective a "labor theory of property" which is as different from Marx's labor theory of value as it is from (...)
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  24. John Alan Lehman (2006). Intellectual Property Rights and Chinese Tradition Section: Philosophical Foundations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (1):1 - 9.score: 66.0
    Western attempts to obtain Chinese compliance with intellectual property rights have a long history of failure. Most discussions of the problem focus on either legal comparisons or explanations arising from levels of economic development (based primarily on the example of U.S. disregard for such rights during the 18th and 19th centuries). After decades of heated negotiation, intellectual property rights is still one of the major issues of misunderstanding between the West and the various Chinese political entities. This (...)
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  25. Fred Weinstein (1990). History and Theory After the Fall: An Essay on Interpretation. University of Chicago Press.score: 66.0
    In this ambitious work, Fred Weinstein confronts the obstacles that have increasingly frustrated our attempts to explain social and historical reality. Traditionally, we have relied on history and social theory to describe the ways people understand the world they live in. But the ordering explanations we have always used--derived from the classical social theories originally forged by Marx, Tocqueville, Weber, Durkheim, Freud--have collapsed. In the wake of this collapse or "fall," the rival claims of fiction, psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, and (...)
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  26. Amit Ron (2008). Visions of Democracy in 'Property-Owning Democracy': Skelton to Rawls and Beyond. History of Political Thought 29 (1):89-108.score: 60.0
    The idea of a 'property-owning democracy' became central to John Rawls's re-evaluation of his theory of justice. This article traces the origins of Rawls's concept of `property-owning democracy' first to the writings of the economist James Meade and then to those of early twentieth-century British conservatives, focusing on the question of how the meaning of democracy was defined and re-defined throughout this history. I argue that Rawls inherited a discursive matrix from the British conservatives in which the (...)
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  27. Mark Sagoff (2009). Who is the Invader? Alien Species, Property Rights, and the Police Power. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):26-52.score: 54.0
    This paper argues that the occurrence of a non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, on one's property does not constitute a nuisance in the context of background principles of common law. No one is injured by it. The control of non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, does not constitute a compelling public interest, moreover, but represents primarily the concern of an epistemic community of conservation biologists and ecologists. This paper describes a history of cases in agricultural law that (...)
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  28. Theodoros Papaioannou (2006). Towards a Critique of the Moral Foundations of Intellectual Property Rights. Journal of Global Ethics 2 (1):67 – 90.score: 54.0
    Research in recent history has neglected to address the moral foundations of particular kinds of public policy such as the protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs). On the one hand, nation-states have enforced a tightening of the IPR system. On the other, only recently have national government and international institutions recognised that the moral justification for stronger IPRs protection is far from being plausible and cannot be taken for granted. In this article, IPRs are examined as individual rights (...)
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  29. Gareth Ernest Boardman (2013). Addressing the Conflict Between Relativity and Quantum Theory: Models, Measurement and the Markov Property. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):86-115.score: 54.0
    Twenty-first century science faces a dilemma. Two of its well-verified foundation stones - relativity and quantum theory - have proven inconsistent. Resolution of the conflict has resisted improvements in experimental precision leaving some to believe that some fundamental understanding in our world-view may need modification or even radical reform. Employment of the wave-front model of electrodynamics, as a propagation process with a Markov property, may offer just such a clarification.
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  30. Michael Gorman (2005). Intellectual Property Rights, Moral Imagination, and Access to Life-Enhancing Drugs. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):595-613.score: 54.0
    Although the idea of intellectual property (IP) rights—proprietary rights to what one invents, writes, paints, composes or creates—is firmlyembedded in Western thinking, these rights are now being challenged across the globe in a number of areas. This paper will focus on one of these challenges: government-sanctioned copying of patented drugs without permission or license of the patent owner in the name of national security, in health emergencies, or life-threatening epidemics. After discussing standard rights-based and utilitarian arguments defending intellectual (...) we will present another model. IP is almost always a result of a long history of scientific or technological development and numbers of networks of creativity, not the act of a single person or a group of people at one moment in time. Thus thinking about and evaluating IP requires thinking about IP as shared rights. A network approach to IP challenges a traditional model of IP. It follows that the owner of those rights has some obligations to share that information or its outcomes. If that conclusion is applied to the distribution of antiretroviral drugs, what pharmaceutical companies are ethically required to do to increase access to these medicines in the developing world will have to be reanalyzed from a more systemic perspective. (shrink)
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  31. Andrew Hunter (2007). Indigenous Peoples' Intellectual Property. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:97-103.score: 54.0
    The present paper examines conventional wisdom on the subject of the justification of indigenous peoples' intellectual property rights, and offers an alternative approach. The examination is achieved by a critique of two such conventional approaches in terms of the strength of each argument employed, and in terms of the efficacy of each in the roles allotted to them. The first such argument is Stenson and Gray's application of Kymlicka's individualist theory advocating national minority autonomy. The second argument is the (...)
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  32. Philip Clayton (2010). Freedom, Consciousness, and Science: An Emergentist Response to the Challenge. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 985--998.score: 54.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * A Neuroscientific Theory of Cognition: The Global Workspace Model * The Burden of Proof and the Loss of Innocence * The Harshest Attack on Freedom and Consciousness: Daniel Dennett * A More Radical Entailment? * Consciousness as an Emergent Property * Conclusion * Notes.
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  33. Jonathan Lamb (2011). The Things Things Say. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    Prologue -- Part 1: Property, personification, and idols: Owning things; the crying of lost things; making babies in the South Seas; the growth of idols; The rape of the lock as still life -- Part 2: Persons and fictions: Locke's wild fancies; fictionality and the representation of persons -- Part 3: Authors and nonpersons: me and my ink; things as authors; authors owning nothing.
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  34. John O'Neill, Property, Care and Environment.score: 54.0
    One influential approach to environmental problems holds that their solution requires the definition of full liberal property rights over goods that will enable their value to be registered in actual or hypothetical markets. How adequate is that solution? In this paper I offer reasons to be sceptical, by placing recent liberal arguments in the context of older debates about property, in particular those concerned with the distribution of care. Although proposals for the extension of liberal property rights (...)
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  35. Abhijit Gupta (2012). Popular Printing and Intellectual Property in Colonial Bengal. Thesis Eleven 113 (1):32-44.score: 54.0
    This article surveys the early history of printing in colonial Bengal, in particular the rise of the indigenous book trade in the Battala area of Calcutta. The article argues that the likes of Gangakishore Bhattacharya and Bhabanicharan Bandyopadhyay were among the first to attempt to socialize the printed book, leading to the rise of a substantial interpretive community by the middle of the 19th century. At the same time, traces of manuscript book practice lingered in the printed book, especially (...)
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  36. Amy E. Wendling (2012). The Ruling Ideas: Bourgeois Political Concepts. Lexington Books.score: 54.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction -- Chapter 1: Labor -- Political Ontology -- The Category Labor -- Labor1: Ontology of the Self -- Labor2: Historical Mode of Activity -- Labor3: Category of Capitalist Modernity -- Conclusion: On Work and Identity -- Chapter 2: Time -- Abstract Time as a System of Domination -- Bourgeois Temporal Norms -- Resistances to Temporal Domination -- Rebellions against Temporal Domination -- Complicity with Temporal Domination -- Conclusion: Social Class and Temporality -- Chapter 3: (...) -- Bourgeois Property and Ownership -- Is Water Property? -- Is Your Body Property? -- Conclusion: Does Property Help or Harm Us? -- Chapter 4: Value -- Use Value, Bourgeois Value, and The Work of Retrieval -- The Paradox of Value -- Imagining Value -- On Aristotle, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx -- Conclusion: Labor's Exchange Value -- Chapter 5: Crisis -- Political Economy -- Recurrence of Crisis -- Fall in the Rate of Profit -- The 2008 Economic Crisis and the False Desire of Home Ownership -- Conclusion: Crisis Writ Large. (shrink)
     
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  37. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Ethical Assumptions in Economic Theory: Some Lessons From the History of Credit and Bankruptcy. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):347 - 360.score: 48.0
    This paper evaluates the economic assumptions of economic theory via an examination of the capitalist transformation of creditor–debtor relations in the 18th century. This transformation enabled masses of people to obtain credit without moral opprobrium or social subordination. Classical 18th century economics had the ethical concepts to appreciate these facts. Ironically, contemporary economic theory cannot. I trace this fault to its abstract representations of freedom, efficiency, and markets. The virtues of capitalism lie in the concrete social relations and social meanings (...)
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  38. Francesco Fagiani (1983). Natural Law and History in Locke's Theory of Distributive Justice. Topoi 2 (2):163-185.score: 48.0
    According to the tradition of natural law justice is inherent to, and should always be observed in, all interpersonal relations: the science of natural law is nothing more or less than the expression of such principles of justice. The theoretical peculiarities that crop up regarding the lawfulness of appropriation are determined by the indirect interpersonal relations that take place within the process of appropriation: though appropriation is an action directed not towards another person or his property, but towards tangible (...)
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  39. León Gómez Rivas (1999). Business Ethics and the History of Economics in Spain "the School of Salamanca: A Bibliography". [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):191 - 202.score: 48.0
    The name "School of Salamanca" refers to a group of theologians and natural law philosophers who taught in the University of Salamanca, following the inspiration of the great Thomist Francisco de Vitoria. It turns out that the Scholastics were not simply medieval, but began in the 13th century and expanded through the 16th and 17th centuries; and they developed some original theories about economics and international law.Why should a few men mainly interested in theology and ethics apply themselves in analyzing (...)
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  40. Frédérick-Guillaume Dufour, Jonathan Martineau & Ellen Meiksins Wood (2011). Le Marxisme politique et ses débats. Actuel Marx 2 (2):98-118.score: 48.0
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  41. Dan Breazeale (2012). Fichte's Social and Political Philosophy: Property and Virtue. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):417-420.score: 42.0
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 20, Issue 2, Page 417-420, March 2012.
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  42. J. D. (1999). On State Spaces and Property Lattices. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (1):61-83.score: 42.0
    I present an annotated development of the basic ideas of the Geneva School approach to the foundations of physics and the structures which emerge as mathematical representations of the physically dual notions of state and property.
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  43. E. Putterman (1999). The Role of Public Opinion in Rousseau's Conception of Property. History of Political Thought 20 (3):417-437.score: 42.0
    For many readers, Rousseau's views on property represent the most ambiguous and contradictory aspect of an already undeveloped economic theory. In this paper, I re-examine this popular criticism from the standpoint of the philosopher's well-known critique of public opinion to argue that property is a more consistent and systematically articulated concept in Rousseau's writings than may appear. I argue that opinion, rather than private property, poses the greatest danger to self-made law and that the narrowness and peculiarity (...)
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  44. Neus Sanmarti, Merce Izquierdo & Rod Watson (1995). The Substantialisation of Properties in Pupils' Thinking and in the History of Science. Science and Education 4 (4):349-369.score: 40.0
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  45. Lilyan A. Brudner & Douglas R. White (1997). Class, Property, and Structural Endogamy: Visualizing Networked Histories. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 26 (2-3):161-208.score: 40.0
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  46. Leo J. Elders (2002). The Transcendental Properties of Being. Introduction: A Concise History Up to Thomas Aquinas. Sapientia 57 (212):459-482.score: 40.0
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  47. Keqian Xu (2006). 論儒家哲學之“道”的實踐屬性與歷史屬性On the Practice and History Attributes of the “Dao” in the Confucian Philosophy. 學術論壇 Academic Forum, 2006 (11):32-34.score: 38.0
    The important feature of Dao as a philosophic category in early Confucian philosophy is its prominent practical and historical properties, which make it different from those western metaphysic categories. Confucianism emphasizes that the Dao can not be separated with the practice and the history of human being, thus the Tao should be explored in peoples’ social activities and history. They believe that the Tao only lives in the historical tradition and can only be demonstrated by the narrative of (...)
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  48. Oliver O'Donovan (2009). The Language of Rights and Conceptual History. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):193-207.score: 38.0
    The historical problem about the origins of the language of rights derives its importance from the conceptual problem: of "two fundamentally different ways of thinking about justice," which is basic? Is justice unitary or plural? This in turn opens up a problem about the moral status of human nature. A narrative of the origins of "rights" is an account of how and when a plural concept of justice comes to the fore, and will be based on the occurrence of definite (...)
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  49. Jose Luis Bermudez (1996). Locke, Property Dualism and Metaphysical Dualism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4:223-245.score: 36.0
  50. Luce Irigaray (1996). I Love to You: Sketch for a Felicity Within History. Routledge.score: 36.0
    In I Love to You , Luce Irigaray moves from the critique of patriarchy to an exploration of the ground for a possible inter-subjectivity between the two sexes. Continuing her rejection of demands for equality, Irigaray poses the question: how can we move to a new era of sexual difference in which women and men establish lasting relations with one another without reducing the other to the status of object? Drawing upon Hegel, Irigaray proposes a dialectic appropriate to each sex (...)
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