Search results for 'Propositional forms' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Proving in Finite Many-Valued Propositional (forthcoming). An Algorithm for Axiomatizing and Theorem Proving in Finite Many-Valued Propositional Logics* Walter A. Carnielli. Logique Et Analyse.
     
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  2.  3
    M. W. Bunder (1979). Alternative Forms of Propositional Calculus for a Given Deduction Theorem. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (3):613-619.
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  3. R. Harrop, H. Arnold Schmidt, K. Schutte & Ronald Harrop (1975). Some Forms of Models of Propositional Calculi. Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (2):251-251.
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  4. Dolph Ulrich (1975). Review: R. Harrop, H. Arnold Schmidt, K. Schutte, H.-J. Thiele, Some Forms of Models of Propositional Calculi; Ronald Harrop, On the Equivalence for Non-Derivability Testing of Finite Smiley Models and Finite Modified Smiley Models. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (2):251-251.
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  5.  15
    Shane J. Ralston, Operationalizing Propositions as Proposals: Reviving Interest in John Dewey's Theory of Propositional Form.
    Dewey and Russell's debate over the status of logic in the twentieth-century is, by now, well-trodden ground for scholarly inquiry. However, Dewey's novel theory of propositions, first articulated in his 1938 Logic: The Theory of Inquiry, has received comparatively less attention than the debate that touched upon it. The paucity of interest among philosophers of language is probably due to a variety of reasons, such as the theory's unorthodox character and, what at least appears to be, its naive simplicity when (...)
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  6.  8
    M. Dusche (1995). Interpreted Logical Forms as Objects of the Attitudes. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 4 (4):301-315.
    Two arguments favoring propositionalist accounts of attitude sentences are being revisited: the Church-Langford translation argument and Thomason's argument against quotational theories of indirect discourse. None of them proves to be decisive, thus leaving the option of searching for a developed quotational alternative. Such an alternative is found in an interpreted logical form theory of attitude ascription. The theory differentiates elegantly among different attitudes but it fails to account for logical dependencies among them. It is argued, however, that the concept of (...)
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  7.  57
    William P. Bechtel & A. Abrahamson (1990). Beyond the Exclusively Propositional Era. Synthese 82 (2):223-53.
    Contemporary epistemology has assumed that knowledge is represented in sentences or propositions. However, a variety of extensions and alternatives to this view have been proposed in other areas of investigation. We review some of these proposals, focusing on (1) Ryle's notion of knowing how and Hanson's and Kuhn's accounts of theory-laden perception in science; (2) extensions of simple propositional representations in cognitive models and artificial intelligence; (3) the debate concerning imagistic versus propositional representations in cognitive psychology; (4) recent (...)
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  8.  39
    Kevin C. Klement, Propositional Logic. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Propositional logic, also known as sentential logic and statement logic, is the branch of logic that studies ways of joining and/or modifying entire propositions, statements or sentences to form more complicated propositions, statements or sentences, as well as the logical relationships and properties that are derived from these methods of combining or altering statements. In propositional logic, the simplest statements are considered as indivisible units, and hence, propositional logic does not study those logical properties and relations that (...)
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  9. Robert Fiengo & Robert May, Interpreted Logical Forms: A Critique.
    Interpreted Logical Forms are objects composed of a syntactic structure annotated with the semantic values of each node of the structure. We criticize the view that ILFs are the objects of propositional attitude verbs such as believe, as this is developed by Larson and Ludlow. Our critique arises from a tension in the way that sen-.
     
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  10.  1
    G. Sandu & A. Pietarinen (2001). Partiality and Games: Propositional Logic. Logic Journal of the IGPL 9 (1):101-121.
    We study partiality in propositional logics containing formulas with either undefined or over-defined truth-values. Undefined values are created by adding a four-place connective W termed transjunction to complete models which, together with the usual Boolean connectives is shown to be functionally complete for all partial functions. Transjunction is seen to be motivated from a game-theoretic perspective, emerging from a two-stage extensive form semantic game of imperfect information between two players. This game-theoretic approach yields an interpretation where partiality is generated (...)
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  11.  15
    Renate A. Schmidt & Dmitry Tishkovsky (2008). On Combinations of Propositional Dynamic Logic and Doxastic Modal Logics. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (1):109-129.
    We prove completeness and decidability results for a family of combinations of propositional dynamic logic and unimodal doxastic logics in which the modalities may interact. The kind of interactions we consider include three forms of commuting axioms, namely, axioms similar to the axiom of perfect recall and the axiom of no learning from temporal logic, and a Church–Rosser axiom. We investigate the influence of the substitution rule on the properties of these logics and propose a new semantics for (...)
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  12.  1
    Silvio Ghilardi (1995). An Algebraic Theory of Normal Forms. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 71 (3):189-245.
    In this paper we present a general theory of normal forms, based on a categorial result for the free monoid construction. We shall use the theory mainly for proposictional modal logic, although it seems to have a wider range of applications. We shall formally represent normal forms as combinatorial objects, basically labelled trees and forests. This geometric conceptualization is implicit in and our approach will extend it to other cases and make it more direct: operations of a purely (...)
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  13.  5
    Hannes Rakoczy (forthcoming). In Defense of a Developmental Dogma: Children Acquire Propositional Attitude Folk Psychology Around Age 4. Synthese:1-19.
    When do children acquire a propositional attitude folk psychology or theory of mind? The orthodox answer to this central question of developmental ToM research had long been that around age 4 children begin to apply “belief” and other propositional attitude concepts. This orthodoxy has recently come under serious attack, though, from two sides: Scoffers complain that it over-estimates children’s early competence and claim that a proper understanding of propositional attitudes emerges only much later. Boosters criticize the orthodoxy (...)
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  14.  12
    Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen (2001). Propositional Logic of Imperfect Information: Foundations and Applications. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 42 (4):193-210.
    I will show that the semantic structure of a new imperfect-information propositional logic can be described in terms of extensive forms of semantic games. I will discuss some ensuing properties of these games such as imperfect recall, informational consistency, and team playing. Finally, I will suggest a couple of applications that arise in physics, and most notably in quantum theory and quantum logics.
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  15.  4
    Ciro Russo (2013). An Order-Theoretic Analysis of Interpretations Among Propositional Deductive Systems. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 164 (2):112-130.
    In this paper we study interpretations and equivalences of propositional deductive systems by using a quantale-theoretic approach introduced by Galatos and Tsinakis. Our aim is to provide a general order-theoretic framework which is able to describe and characterize both strong and weak forms of interpretations among propositional deductive systems also in the cases where the systems have different underlying languages.
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  16.  13
    Mitsunori Kobayashi & Arata Ishimoto (1982). A Propositional Fragment of Leśniewski's Ontology and its Formulation by the Tableau Method. Studia Logica 41 (2-3):181 - 195.
    The propositional fragment L 1 of Leniewski's ontology is the smallest class (of formulas) containing besides all the instances of tautology the formulas of the forms: (a, b) (a, a), (a, b) (b,). (a, c) and (a, b) (b, c). (b, a) being closed under detachment. The purpose of this paper is to furnish another more constructive proof than that given earlier by one of us for: Theorem A is provable in L 1 iff TA is a thesis (...)
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  17.  24
    Eric J. Loomis (2005). Logical Form and Propositional Function in the Tractatus. Theoria 71 (3):215-240.
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus carefully distinguished the concept all from\nthe notion of a truth-function, and thereby from the quantifiers.\nI argue that Wittgenstein's rationale for this distinction is lost\nunless propositional functions are understood within the context\nof his picture theory of the proposition. Using a model Tractatus\nlanguage, I show how there are two distinct forms of generality implicit\nin quantified Tractatus propositions. Although the explanation given\nin the Tractatus for this distinction is ultimately flawed, the distinction\nitself is a genuine one, and the forms (...)
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  18.  29
    J. Edwards (1999). Interpreted Logical Forms and Knowing Your Own Mind. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (2):169-90.
    An attractive semantic theory presented by Richard K. Larson and Peter Ludlow takes a report of propositional attitudes, e.g 'Tom believes Judy Garland sang', to report a believing relation between Tom and an interpreted logical form constructed from 'Judy Garland sang'. We briefly outline the semantic theory and indicate its attractions. However, the definition of interpreted logical forms given by Larson and Ludlow is shown to be faulty, and an alternative definition is offered which matches their intentions. This (...)
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  19.  18
    Lloyd Humberstone (2004). Archetypal Forms of Inference. Synthese 141 (1):45 - 76.
    A form (or pattern) of inference, let us say, explicitlysubsumes just such particular inferences as are instances of the form, and implicitly subsumes thoseinferences with a premiss and conclusion logically equivalent to the premiss and conclusion of an instanceof the form in question. (For simplicity we restrict attention to one-premiss inferences.) A form ofinference is archetypal if it implicitly subsumes every correct inference. A precise definition (Section 1)of these concepts relativizes them to logics, since different logics classify different inferences ascorrect, (...)
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  20.  3
    E. López-Escobar (2008). Chateaubriand on Propositional Logic. Manuscrito 31 (1):103-113.
    In Logical Forms Part II, Chateaubriand begins the Chapter on “Propositional Logic” by considering the reading of the ‘conditional’ by ‘implies’; in fact he states that:There is a confusion, as a matter of fact, and it runs deep, but it is a confusion in propositional logic itself, and the mathematician’s reading is a rather sensible one.After a careful, erudite analysis of various philosophical viewpoints of logic, Chateaubriand comes to the conclusion that:Pure propositional logic, as just characterized, (...)
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  21.  2
    Sun-Joo Shin (2011). Peirce's Alpha Graphs and Propositional Languages. Semiotica 2011 (186):333-346.
    Many do not doubt that Peirce's Existential Graphs are diagrammatic, as opposed to symbolic. However, when we are pressured to draw a distinction between the two different forms of representation, we find ourselves at a loss and our intuition quite vague. In this paper, I locate fundamental differences between two logically equivalent systems, Peirce's Alpha system and propositional languages. Suppose we have only two sentential connectives, ¬ and ^. In spite of its truth-functional completeness, we don't want to (...)
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  22.  66
    Michael W. Pelczar (2007). Forms and Objects of Thought. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (1):97-122.
    It is generally assumed that if it is possible to believe that p without believing that q, then there is some difference between the object of the thought that p and the object of the thought that q. This assumption is challenged in the present paper, opening the way to an account of epistemic opacity that improves on existing accounts, not least because it casts doubt on various arguments that attempt to derive startling ontological conclusions from seemingly innocent epistemic premises.
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  23. George Bealer (1998). A Theory of Concepts and Concepts Possession. Philosophical Issues 9:261-301.
    The paper begins with an argument against eliminativism with respect to the propositional attitudes. There follows an argument that concepts are sui generis ante rem entities. A nonreductionist view of concepts and propositions is then sketched. This provides the background for a theory of concept possession, which forms the bulk of the paper. The central idea is that concept possession is to be analyzed in terms of a certain kind of pattern of reliability in one’s intuitions regarding the (...)
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  24.  34
    João Branquinho (2014). Indexical Sinn: Fregeanism Versus Millianism. Revista de Filosofia Aurora 26 (39):465-486.
    This paper discusses two notational variance views with respect to indexical singular reference and content: the view that certain forms of Millianism are at bottom notational variants of a Fregean theory of reference, the Fregean Notational Variance Claim; and the view that certain forms of Fregeanism are at bottom notational variants of a direct reference theory, the Millian Notational Variance Claim. While the former claim rests on the supposition that a direct reference theory could be easily turned into (...)
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  25.  56
    David Sherry (2006). Formal Logic for Informal Logicians. Informal Logic 26 (2):199-220.
    Classical logic yields counterintuitive results for numerous propositional argument forms. The usual alternatives (modal logic, relevance logic, etc.) generate counterintuitive results of their own. The counterintuitive results create problems—especially pedagogical problems—for informal logicians who wish to use formal logic to analyze ordinary argumentation. This paper presents a system, PL– (propositional logic minus the funny business), based on the idea that paradigmatic valid argument forms arise from justificatory or explanatory discourse. PL– avoids the pedagogical difficulties without sacrificing (...)
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  26.  26
    George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (1988). How to Be Realistic About Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 1 (1):69-81.
    Folk psychological realism is the view that folk psychology is true and that people really do have propositional attitudes, whereas anti-realism is the view that folk psychology is false and people really do not have propositional attitudes. We argue that anti-realism is not worthy of acceptance and that realism is eminently worthy of acceptance. However, it is plainly epistemically possible to favor either of two forms of folk realism: scientific or non-scientific. We argue that non-scientific realism, while (...)
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  27. Peter Ludlow (2000). Interpreted Logical Forms, Belief Attribution, and the Dynamic Lexicon. In K. Jaczszolt (ed.), The Pragmatics of Propositional Attitudes. Elsevier
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  28.  12
    Robert F. Hadley (1991). A Sense-Based, Process Model of Belief. Minds and Machines 1 (3):279-320.
    A process-oriented model of belief is presented which permits the representation of nested propositional attitudes within first-order logic. The model (NIM, for nested intensional model) is axiomatized, sense-based (via intensions), and sanctions inferences involving nested epistemic attitudes, with different agents and different times. Because NIM is grounded upon senses, it provides a framework in which agents may reason about the beliefs of another agent while remaining neutral with respect to the syntactic forms used to express the latter agent's (...)
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  29.  3
    Bo Göranzon (1987). The Practice of the Use of Computers. AI and Society 1 (1):25-36.
    A quotation from Shakespeare's play King Lear, ‘I will teach you differences’, encapsulates the spirit of this paper. The distinction is introduced between three different categories of knowledge: i) propositional knowledge, ii) skill or practical knowledge and iii) knowledge of familiarity. In the present debate on ‘Information Society’, there is a clear tendency to overemphasise the theoretical knowledge at the expense of practical knowledge thereby completely ignoring the knowledge of familiarity. It is argued that different forms of theoretical (...)
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  30.  2
    Clare Dixon, Alexander Bolotov & Michael Fisher (2005). Alternating Automata and Temporal Logic Normal Forms. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 135 (1-3):263-285.
    We provide a translation from SNFPLTL, a normal form for propositional linear time temporal logic, into alternating automata on infinite words, and vice versa. We show this translation has the property that the set of SNFPLTL clauses is satisfiable if and only if the alternating automaton has an accepting run. As there is no direct method known for checking the non-emptiness of alternating automata, the translation to SNFPLTL, together with a temporal proof on the resulting SNFPLTL clauses, provides an (...)
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  31. Joe Lau, Belief Reports and Interpreted-Logical Forms.
    One major obstacle in providing a compositional semantics for natural languages is that it is not clear how we should deal with propositional attitude contexts. In this paper I will discuss the Interpreted Logical Form proposal , focusing on the case of belief. This proposal has been developed in different ways by authors such as Harman (1972), Higginbotham (1986,1991), Segal (1989) and Larson and Ludlow (1993). On this approach, the that-clause of a belief report is treated as a singular (...)
     
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  32.  10
    Antoni Korcik (1953). A Contribution to the History of Propositional Calculus. Studia Logica 1 (1):253.
    The anonimous scholiumOn all forms of syllogism was copied in 1884 from the Paris Codex 2064 by E. Richter. In 1899 M. Wallies published it in the preface to Ammonius' commentary on the Prior Analytics of Aristotle. There appear in that scholium, apart from the complex figure of Galenos, other characteristic forms of inference.Among these forms I found five so-called non-demonstrable stoic syllogisms, three modifications of the law of transposition of which the third is not mentioned by (...)
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  33. Ján Pich (2011). Nisan-Wigderson Generators in Proof Systems with Forms of Interpolation. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 57 (4):379-383.
    We prove that the Nisan-Wigderson generators based on computationally hard functions and suitable matrices are hard for propositional proof systems that admit feasible interpolation. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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  34.  6
    Haridimos Tsoukas (2004). Complex Knowledge: Studies in Organizational Epistemology. OUP Oxford.
    In this book Haridimos Tsoukas, one of the most imaginative organization theorists of our time, examines the nature of knowledge in organizations, and how individuals and scholars approach the concept of knowledge. -/- Tsoukas firstly looks at organizational knowledge and its embeddedness in social contexts and forms of life. He shows that knowledge is not just a collection of free floating representations of the world to be used at will, but an activity constitutive of the world. On the one (...)
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  35. Robert Audi (2009). Nationalism, Patriotism, and Cosmopolitanism in an Age of Globalization. Journal of Ethics 13 (4):365-381.
    A major issue in political philosophy is the extent to which one or another version of nationalism or, by contrast, cosmopolitanism, is morally justified. Nationalism, like cosmopolitanism, may be understood as a position on the status and responsibilities of nation states, but the terms may also be used to designate attitudes appropriate to those positions. One problem in political philosophy is to distinguish and appraise various forms of nationalism and cosmopolitanism ; a related problem is how to understand the (...)
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  36.  19
    Kjell S. Johannessen (1988). Rule Following and Tacit Knowledge. AI and Society 2 (4):287-301.
    This paper discusses the interrelationship between wisdom, science and craft from the perspective of the Wittgenstein concept of tacit knowledge. It challenges the notion of the ‘rules-model’ as put forward by Logical Positivists, and shows the limitation of this model for describing the tacit dimension of knowledge. The paper demonstrates the crucial role of practice in ‘rule-following’ in the real world. It is held that ‘to follow a rule’ is to practice a custom, a usage or an institutional practice. Hence, (...)
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  37. Haridimos Tsoukas (2004). Complex Knowledge. Oxford University Press Uk.
    In this book Haridimos Tsoukas, one of the most imaginative organization theorists of our time, examines the nature of knowledge in organizations, and how individuals and scholars approach the concept of knowledge.Tsoukas firstly looks at organizational knowledge and its embeddedness in social contexts and forms of life. He shows that knowledge is not just a collection of free floating representations of the world to be used at will, but an activity constitutive of the world. On the one hand the (...)
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  38. Anne Bezuidenhout (2006). Vp-Ellipsis And The Case For Representationalism In Semantics. Protosociology 22.
    The debate between representationalists and anti-representationalists as I construe it in this chapter is a debate about whether truth-conditions are or should be assigned directly to natural language sentences (NLSs) – the anti-representationalist view – or whether they are or should be assigned instead to mental representations (MRs) that are related in some appropriate way to these NLSs. On the representationalist view, these MRs are related to NLSs in virtue of the fact that the MRs are the output of an (...)
     
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  39.  45
    Reinhardt Grossmann (1972). Russell's Paradox and Complex Properties. Noûs 6 (2):153-164.
    The author argues that the primary lesson of the so-Called logical and semantical paradoxes is that certain entities do not exist, Entities of which we mistakenly but firmly believe that they must exist. In particular, Russell's paradox teaches us that there is no such thing as the property which every property has if and only if it does not have itself. Why should anyone think that such a property must exist and, Hence, Conceive of russell's argument as a paradox rather (...)
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  40.  24
    Charles J. Kelly (2002). S4 and Aristotle on Three Syllogisms with Contingent Premisses. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:405-431.
    Aristotle assesses as valid three first figure syllogisms, each of which contains at least one premiss expressing a de re contingency. In fact, all three of these moods (namely, Barbara-QQQ, Barbara-XQM, and Barbara-LQM) are invalid. Utilizing the concept of ampliation, this paper shows how the mood Barbara-QQQ must be refined if it is to be deemed valid. It can then become clear as to how Barbara-XQM and Barbara-LQM can be disambiguated and ultimately validated. In treating all three moods, some theses (...)
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  41.  2
    Fabrice Pataut, Language, Normativity and Emotion.
    Emotions are part of our culture ; particular emotions like resentment andguilt are part of specific cultural heritages. On the other hand, moral judgementsand imperatives have the appearance of objectivity. There lies - or so it seems -a conflict, even a contradiction. Statements like "Slavery is unjust" may beasserted, agreements may be reached concerning what they claim or express,and they may occur as antecedents in conditionals such as "If slavery is unjust,then it must be abolished". When it is claimed that (...)
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  42.  14
    Brice Halimi (2011). The Versatility of Universality inPrincipia Mathematica. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (3):241-264.
    In this article, I examine the ramified-type theory set out in the first edition of Russell and Whitehead's Principia Mathematica. My starting point is the ?no loss of generality? problem: Russell, in the Introduction (Russell, B. and Whitehead, A. N. 1910. Principia Mathematica, Volume I, 1st ed., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 53?54), says that one can account for all propositional functions using predicative variables only, that is, dismissing non-predicative variables. That claim is not self-evident at all, hence a (...)
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  43.  1
    J. M. Mill (1986). Some Comments on Dr Iglesias's Paper, 'In Vitro Fertilisation: The Major Issues'. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (1):32-35.
    In an article in an earlier edition of the Journal of Medical Ethics (1) Dr Iglesias bases her analysis upon the mediaeval interpretation of Platonic metaphysics and Aristotelian logic as given by Aquinas. Propositional forms are applied to the analysis of experience. This results in a very abstract analysis. The essential connection of events and their changing temporal relationships are ignored. The dichotomy between body and soul is a central concept. The unchanging elements in experience are assumed to (...)
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  44.  4
    Narahari Rao (2002). Culture as Learnables. Manuscrito 25 (2):465-488.
    I want to argue that there is a task of ‘culture research’ other than what is practised in the empirical disciplines such as Social Anthropology or historical disciplines such as Literary Studies. Suppose ‘Cultures’ are looked upon as different legacies of ways of going about in the world resulting from the different pasts of different groups of people. Such ways can be either approached as a phenomena to be explained or as an embodiment of knowledge dispositions to be learnt. However, (...)
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  45. Maarten Wisse (2005). Narrative Theology and the Use of the Bible in Systematic Theology. Ars Disputandi: The Online Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5.
    An important development in Christian theology during the second half of the twentieth century was what we might call the ‘narrative turn’—i.e. the idea that Christian theology’s use of the Bible should focus on a narrative representation of the faith rather than the development of a set of propositions deduced from the data of revelation. This paper inquires, first, whether and to what extent a narrative approach to systematic theology is incompatible with a ‘referential account’. It is argued that a (...)
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  46. Gheorghe-Ilie Farte (2015). On the Presence of Educated Religious Beliefs in the Public Sphere. Argumentum. Journal of the Seminar of Discursive Logic, Argumentation Theory and Rhetoric 13 (2):146-178.
    Discursive liberal democracy might not be the best of all possible forms of government, yet in Europe it is largely accepted as such. The attractors of liberal democracy (majority rule, political equality, reasonable self-determination and an ideological framework built in a tentative manner) as well as an adequate dose of secularization (according to the doctrine of religious restraint) provide both secularist and educated religious people with the most convenient ideological framework. Unfortunately, many promoters of ideological secularization take too strong (...)
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  47. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate forms, (...)
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  48.  21
    Christopher S. Hill (2009). Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides a comprehensive and novel theory of consciousness. In clear and non-technical language, Christopher Hill provides interrelated accounts of six main forms of consciousness - agent consciousness, propositional consciousness (consciousness that), introspective consciousness, relational consciousness (consciousness of), experiential consciousness, and phenomenal consciousness. He develops the representational theory of mind in new directions, showing in detail how it can be used to undercut dualistic accounts of mental states. In addition he offers original and stimulating discussions of a (...)
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  49. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2007). The Return of the Myth of the Mental. Inquiry 50 (4):352 – 365.
    McDowell's claim that "in mature human beings, embodied coping is permeated with mindedness",1 suggests a new version of the mentalist myth which, like the others, is untrue to the phenomenon. The phenomena show that embodied skills, when we are fully absorbed in enacting them, have a kind of non-mental content that is non-conceptual, non-propositional, non-rational and non-linguistic. This is not to deny that we can monitor our activity while performing it. For solving problems, learning a new skill, receiving coaching, (...)
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  50. J. Adam Carter & Jesper Kallestrup (2015). Extended Cognition and Propositional Memory. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2):n/a-n/a.
    The philosophical case for extended cognition is often made with reference to ‘extended-memory cases’ ; though, unfortunately, proponents of the hypothesis of extended cognition as well as their adversaries have failed to appreciate the kinds of epistemological problems extended-memory cases pose for mainstream thinking in the epistemology of memory. It is time to give these problems a closer look. Our plan is as follows: in §1, we argue that an epistemological theory remains compatible with HEC only if its epistemic assessments (...)
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