Search results for 'Prue Burns' (try it on Scholar)

861 found
Order:
  1. Prue Burns & Jan Schapper (2008). The Ethical Case for Affirmative Action. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):369 - 379.
    Affirmative action has been a particularly contentious policy issue that has polarised contributions to the debate. Over recent times in most western countries, support for affirmative action has, however, been largely snuffed out or beaten into retreat and replaced by the concept of ‹diversity management’. Thus, any contemporary study that examines the development of affirmative action would suggest that its opponents have won the battle. Nonetheless, this article argues that because the battle has been won on dubious ethical grounds it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Prue Burns & Jan Schapper (2008). The Ethical Case for Affirmative Action. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):369-379.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  15
    Walter J. Freeman & J. Burns (1996). Societies of Brains: Walter Freeman in Conversation with Jean Burns. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (2):172-180.
    [opening paragraph]: Walter Freeman discusses with Jean Burns some of the issues relating to consciousness in his recent book. Burns: To understand consciousness we need know its relationship to the brain, and to do that we need to know how the brain processes information. A lot of people think of brain processing in terms of individual neurons, and you're saying that brain processing should be understood in terms of dynamical states of populations?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    C. Delisle Burns (1932). Book Review:Modern Civilization on Trial. C. Delisle Burns. [REVIEW] Ethics 42 (2):213-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. J. H. Burns (1999). Bibliography of the Writings of JH Burns 1950-1998. History of Political Thought 20:7-20.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Jean E. Burns (2012). The Action of Consciousness and the Uncertainty Principle. Journal of Nonlocality 1 (1).
    The term action of consciousness is used to refer to an influence, such as psychokinesis or free will, that produces an effect on matter that is correlated to mental intention, but not completely determined by physical conditions. Such an action could not conserve energy. But in that case, one wonders why, when highly accurate measurements are done, occasions of non-conserved energy (generated perhaps by unconscious PK) are not detected. A possible explanation is that actions of consciousness take place within the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Chester R. Burns (ed.) (1977). Legacies in Ethics and Medicine. Science History Publications.
    Burns, C. R. Introduction.--Antiquity: Margalith, D. The ideal doctor as depicted in ancient Hebrew writings. Edelstein, L. The Hippocratic oath. Edelstein, L. The professional ethics of the Greek physician. Michler, M. Medical ethics in Hippocratic bone surgery. Maas, P. L., Oliver, J. H. An ancient poem on the duties of a physician.--The medieval era: Levey, M. Medical deontology in ninth century Islam. Bar-Sela, A., Hoff, H. E. Isaac Israeli's fifty admonitions of the physicians. Rosner, F. The physician's prayer attributed (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Helen Casey, Robert D. Rogers, Tom Burns & Jenny Yiend (2013). Emotion Regulation in Psychopathy. Biological Psychology 92:541–548.
    Emotion processing is known to be impaired in psychopathy, but less is known about the cognitive mechanisms that drive this. Our study examined experiencing and suppression of emotion processing in psychopathy. Participants, violent offenders with varying levels of psychopathy, viewed positive and negative images under conditions of passive viewing, experiencing and suppressing. Higher scoring psychopathics were more cardiovascularly responsive when processing negative information than positive, possibly reflecting an anomalously rewarding aspect of processing normally unpleasant material. When required to experience emotional (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  9
    Jonathan Smallwood, Jonathan W. Schooler, David J. Turk, Sheila J. Cunningham, Phebe Burns & C. Neil Macrae (2011). Self-Reflection and the Temporal Focus of the Wandering Mind. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1120-1126.
    Current accounts suggest that self-referential thought serves a pivotal function in the human ability to simulate the future during mind-wandering. Using experience sampling, this hypothesis was tested in two studies that explored the extent to which self-reflection impacts both retrospection and prospection during mind-wandering. Study 1 demonstrated that a brief period of self-reflection yielded a prospective bias during mind-wandering such that participants’ engaged more frequently in spontaneous future than past thought. In Study 2, individual differences in the strength of self-referential (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  10.  24
    Lawrence Burns (2007). Gunther Von Hagens' Body Worlds: Selling Beautiful Education. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):12 – 23.
    In the BODY WORLDS exhibitions currently touring the United States, Gunther von Hagens displays human cadavers preserved through plastination. Whole bodies are playfully posed and exposed to educate the public. However, the educational aims are ambiguous, and some aspects of the exhibit violate human dignity. In particular, the signature cards attached to the whole-body plastinates that bear the title, the signature of Gunther von Hagens, and the date of creation mark the plastinates as artwork and von Hagens as the artist (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  11. Michael O'Neill Burns (2015). Kierkegaard and the Matter of Philosophy: A Fractured Dialectic. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book offers an examination of the political and ontological significance of the authorship of Søren Kierkegaard in relation to German Idealism and contemporary European philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  3
    Richard A. Burns & Rebecca E. Sanders (1987). Concurrent Counting of Two and Three Events in a Serial Anticipation Paradigm. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (6):479-481.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  13.  5
    Timothy Burns (2015). On Being a ‘We’: Edith Stein’s Contribution to the Intentionalism Debate. Human Studies 38 (4):529-547.
    It is commonplace to speak of social groups as if they were capable of the same sorts of activities as individuals. We say, “Germany won the World Cup”; “The United States invaded Iraq”; and “The world mourned the passing of Nelson Mandela”. In so doing, we attribute agency, belief, and emotional states to groups themselves. In recent years, much literature devoted to analyzing such statements and their implications has emerged. Within this literature, the issue of “intentionalism,” whether individuals must have (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. Elizabeth Burns & Michael Lacewing (2004). Essay Writing and Exam Preparation. In Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.), Philosophy for AS and A2. Routledge
  15.  3
    Jennifer Burns, Mimi Reisel Gladstein, Anne Conover Heller & Robert L. Campbell (2014). Robert L. Campbell's Essay, “An End to Over and Against”. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 14 (1):80-91.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  17
    Aaran Burns (forthcoming). A Phenomenal Conservative Perspective on Religious Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    Can religious experience justify belief in God? We best approach this question by splitting it in two: Do religious experiences give their subjects any justification for believing that there is a God of the kind they experience? And Does testimony about such experiences provides any justification for believing that there is a God for those who are not the subject of the experience? The most popular affirmative answers trace back to the work of Richard Swinburne, who appeals to the Principle (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Jean E. Burns (1991). Does Consciousness Perform a Function Independently of the Brain? Frontier Perspectives, Center for Frontier Sciences, Temple University 2 (1):19-34.
    Even if all of the content of conscious experience is encoded in the brain, there is a considerable difference between the view that consciousness does independent processing and the view that it does not. If all processing is done by the brain, then conscious experience is unnecessary and irrelevant to behavior. If consciousness performs a function, then its association with particular aspects of brain processing reflect its functional use in determining behavior. However, if consciousness does perform a function, it cannot (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  7
    Scott Burns, Ichiro Kawachi & Austin Sarat (2002). Integrating Law and Social Epidemiology. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 30 (4):510-521.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  19.  1
    Robert B. Burns (2006). The Relative Effectiveness of Various Incentives and Deterrents as Judged by Pupils and Teachers. Educational Studies 4 (3):229-243.
    (1978). The Relative Effectiveness of Various Incentives and Deterrents as Judged by Pupils and Teachers. Educational Studies: Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 229-243.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  20. Karl Marx, G. A. Bonner & Emile Burns (1954). Theories of Surplus Value. Science and Society 18 (3):274-275.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  21. Jean E. Burns (1996). The Possibility of Empirical Test of Hypotheses About Consciousness. In S. R. Hameroff, A. W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Towards a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press 739--742.
    The possibility of empirical test is discussed with respect to three issues: (1) What is the ontological relationship between consciousness and the brain/physical world? (2) What physical characteristics are associated with the mind/brain interface? (3) Can consciousness act on the brain independently of any brain process?
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Jean E. Burns (1998). Entropy and Vacuum Radiation. Foundations of Physics 28 (7):1191-1207.
    It is shown that entropy increase in thermodynamic systems can plausibly be accounted for by the random action of vacuum radiation. A recent calculation by Rueda using stochastic electrodynamics (SED) shows that vacuum radiation causes a particle to undergo a rapid Brownian motion about its average dynamical trajectory. It is shown that the magnitude of spatial drift calculated by Rueda can also be predicted by assuming that the average magnitudes of random shifts in position and momentum of a particle correspond (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Jean E. Burns (2010). What Does the Mind Do That the Brain Does Not? In R. L. Amoroso (ed.), The Complementarity of Mind and Body: Fulfilling the Dream of Descartes, Einstein and Eccles. Nova Science
    Two forms of independent action by consciousness have been proposed by various researchers – free will and holistic processing. (Holistic processing contributes to the formation of behavior through the holistic use of brain programs and encoding.) The well-known experiment of Libet et al. (1983) implies that if free will exists, its action must consist of making a selection among alternatives presented by the brain. As discussed herein, this result implies that any physical changes mind can produce in the brain are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. C. Delisle Burns (1915). Occam's Razor. Mind 24 (96):592.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  64
    Teresa McCormack & Patrick Burns (2011). Temporal Information and Children's and Adults' Causal Inferences. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (2):167-196.
    Three experiments examined whether children and adults would use temporal information as a cue to the causal structure of a three-variable system, and also whether their judgements about the effects of interventions on the system would be affected by the temporal properties of the event sequence. Participants were shown a system in which two events B and C occurred either simultaneously (synchronous condition) or in a temporal sequence (sequential condition) following an initial event A. The causal judgements of adults and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  1
    Dennis J. Burns & Richard B. Powers (1975). Choice and Self-Control in Children: A Test of Rachlin’s Model. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (2):156-158.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  27.  42
    Elizabeth Burns (2015). Classical and Revisionary Theism on the Divine as Personal: A Rapprochement? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (2):151-165.
    To claim that the divine is a person or personal is, according to Swinburne, ‘the most elementary claim of theism’. I argue that, whether the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal is construed as an analogy or a metaphor, or a combination of the two, analysis necessitates qualification of that concept such that any differences between the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal and revisionary interpretations of that concept are merely (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  27
    C. Delisle Burns (1916). Leibniz's Life and Work. The Monist 26 (4):486-503.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  23
    Kelly Lowenberg, Brenda Simon, Amy Burns, Libby Greismann, Jennifer Halbleib, Govind Persad, David L. M. Preston, Harker Rhodes & Emily Murphy (2010). Misuse Made Plain: Evaluating Concerns About Neuroscience in National Security. AJOB Neuroscience 1 (2):15-17.
  30.  26
    Elizabeth Burns (2004). Julian Baggini: Philosophy: Key Themes and Philosophy: Key Texts. [REVIEW] Think 2 (6):103-106.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. J. H. Burns (1959). Utilitarianism and Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 9 (35):168-171.
  32.  81
    Jean E. Burns (2007). Vacuum Radiation, Entropy, and Molecular Chaos. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1727-1737.
    Vacuum radiation causes a particle to make a random walk about its dynamical trajectory. In this random walk the root mean square change in spatial coordinate is proportional to t 1/2, and the fractional changes in momentum and energy are proportional to t −1/2, where t is time. Thus the exchange of energy and momentum between a particle and the vacuum tends to zero over time. At the end of a mean free path the fractional change in momentum of a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  14
    Daniel G. Chase, David J. Burns & Gregory A. Claypool (1997). A Suggested Ethical Framework for Evaluating Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (16):1753-1763.
    The 1980s witnessed a dramatic increase in hostile takeovers in the United States. Proponents argue that well- planned mergers enhance the value of the firm and the value of the firm to society. Critics typically argue that undesired takeovers ultimately harm society due to external costs not borne by the acquiring firm. To be socially responsible, the manager must consider the effects of the merger/acquisition on all stakeholders. Different traditional ethical frameworks for decision making are proposed and reviewed. A model (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  34.  16
    David J. Burns, Jeffrey K. Fawcett & John Lanasa (1994). Business Students' Ethical Perceptions of Retail Situations: A Microcultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (9):667 - 679.
    Due in part to a growing realization of the importance of the role that retailing plays in the marketing channel, and to the increasing numbers of college graduates being employed by retailers, growing attention is being placed on business students'' ethical perceptions of retailing practices. This study continues this focus by examining the ethical perceptions of collegiate business students attending two different universities which likely represent two different microcultures — conservative evangelical Protestant and secular.The results suggest that ethical perceptions may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  35.  28
    Teresa McCormack, Stephen Andrew Butterfill, Christoph Hoerl & Patrick Burns (2009). Cue Competition Effects and Young Children's Causal and Counterfactual Inferences. Developmental Psychology 45 (6):1563-1575.
    The authors examined cue competition effects in young children using the blicket detector paradigm, in which objects are placed either singly or in pairs on a novel machine and children must judge which objects have the causal power to make the machine work. Cue competition effects were found in a 5- to 6-year-old group but not in a 4-year-old group. Equivalent levels of forward and backward blocking were found in the former group. Children's counterfactual judgments were subsequently examined by asking (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  35
    Jonathan Kenneth Burns (2004). An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social brain, and it (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  37.  34
    Caren A. Frosch, Teresa McCormack, David A. Lagnado & Patrick Burns (2012). Are Causal Structure and Intervention Judgments Inextricably Linked? A Developmental Study. Cognitive Science 36 (2):261-285.
    The application of the formal framework of causal Bayesian Networks to children’s causal learning provides the motivation to examine the link between judgments about the causal structure of a system, and the ability to make inferences about interventions on components of the system. Three experiments examined whether children are able to make correct inferences about interventions on different causal structures. The first two experiments examined whether children’s causal structure and intervention judgments were consistent with one another. In Experiment 1, children (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Steven Burns & Alice MacLachlan (2004). Getting It: On Jokes and Art. AE: Journal of the Canadian Society of Aesthetics 10.
    “What is appreciation?” is a basic question in the philosophy of art, and the analogy between appreciating a work of art and getting a joke can help us answer it. We first propose a subjective account of aesthetic appreciation (I). Then we consider jokes (II). The difference between getting a joke and not, or what it is to get it right, can often be objectively articulated. Such explanations cannot substitute for the joke itself, and indeed may undermine the very power (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  9
    Judy S. DeLoache & Nancy M. Burns (1994). Early Understanding of the Representational Function of Pictures. Cognition 52 (2):83-110.
  40.  12
    Tony Burns (2011). Interpreting and Appropriating Texts in the History of Political Thought: Quentin Skinner and Poststructuralism. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (3):313.
  41.  23
    Michael H. Connors, Bruce D. Burns & Guillermo Campitelli (2011). Expertise in Complex Decision Making: The Role of Search in Chess 70 Years After de Groot. Cognitive Science 35 (8):1567-1579.
    One of the most influential studies in all expertise research is de Groot’s (1946) study of chess players, which suggested that pattern recognition, rather than search, was the key determinant of expertise. Many changes have occurred in the chess world since de Groot’s study, leading some authors to argue that the cognitive mechanisms underlying expertise have also changed. We decided to replicate de Groot’s study to empirically test these claims and to examine whether the trends in the data have changed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  30
    Elizabeth D. Burns (2013). 'Ontological' Arguments From Experience: Daniel A. Dombrowski, Iris Murdoch, and the Nature of Divine Reality. Religious Studies 49 (4):459-480.
    Dombrowski and Murdoch offer versions of the ontological argument which aim to avoid two types of objection – those concerned with the nature of the divine, and those concerned with the move from an abstract concept to a mind-independent reality. For both, the nature of the concept of God/Good entails its instantiation, and both supply a supporting argument from experience. It is only Murdoch who successfully negotiates the transition from an abstract concept to the instantiation of that concept, however, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  6
    R. A. Carson & C. R. Burns (eds.) (1997). Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics. Kluwer.
    Papers presented at a symposium on philosophy and medicine at the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in 1974 were published in the inaugural volume of this series.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  25
    Linda Burns (1995). Something to Do With Vagueness. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (S1):23-47.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  45.  2
    M. Dunn, D. Maughan, T. Hope, K. Canvin, J. Rugkasa, J. Sinclair & T. Burns (2012). Threats and Offers in Community Mental Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):204-209.
    Next SectionMaking threats and offers to patients is a strategy used in community mental healthcare to increase treatment adherence. In this paper, an ethical analysis of these types of proposal is presented. It is argued (1) that the primary ethical consideration is to identify the professional duties of care held by those working in community mental health because the nature of these duties will enable a threat to be differentiated from an offer, (2) that threatening to act in a way (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  22
    Hobert W. Burns (1962). The Logic of the "Educational Implication. Educational Theory 12 (1):53-63.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  47.  68
    Elizabeth Burns (1997). Iris Murdoch and the Nature of Good. Religious Studies 33 (3):303-313.
    Iris Murdoch's concept of Good is a central feature of her moral theory; in Murdoch's thought, attention to the Good is the primary means of improving our moral conduct. Her view has been criticised on the grounds that the Good is irrelevant to life in this world (Don Cupitt), that the notion of a transcendent, single object of attention is incoherent (Stewart Sutherland), and that we can only understand what goodness is if we see it as an attribute of a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  4
    Sevgi Aral, Scott Burns & Clifford Shearing (2002). Health and the Governance of Security: A Tale of Two Systems. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 30 (4):632-643.
  49.  37
    Linda Burns (1986). Vagueness and Coherence. Synthese 68 (3):487 - 513.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  50. C. Delisle Burns (1916). William of Ockham on Continuity. Mind 25 (100):506-512.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 861