Search results for 'Psychoanalysis and anthropology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Anthony Molino (ed.) (2004). Culture, Subject, Psyche: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. Wesleyan University Press.
    In this groundbreaking new work, Anthony Molino has collected in-depth interviews with seven renowned anthropologists and social theorists: MARC AUGE, VINCENT CRAPANZANO, KATHERINE EWING, GANANATH OBEYESEKERE, MICHAEL RUSTIN, KATHLEEN ...
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  2.  9
    Wesley Shumar (2004). Shadow Dialogues: On the (Early) History of Anthropology and Psychoanalysis. In Anthony Molino (ed.), Culture, Subject, Psyche: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. Wesleyan University Press 3--19.
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  3.  35
    Alain Flajoliet (2010). Sartre's Phenomenological Anthropology Between Psychoanalysis and 'Daseinsanalysis'. Sartre Studies International 16 (1):40-59.
    This essay compares Sartre's existential psychoanalysis with Freud's psychoanalysis and Binswanger's Daseinsanalysis . On the one hand, Sartre's psychoanalysis, despite the pure phenomenological interpretation of the factical self (in the first part of Being and Nothingness ), is ultimately metaphysically founded on the concept of 'human reality' (in the fourth part of the book), so that this psychoanalysis cannot be identified with the way of interpreting existence in the Daseinsanalyse . On the other hand, Sartre's phenomenological (...)
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  4.  1
    P. Steven Sandgren (2004). Psychoanalysis and Its Resistances in Michel Foucault's The History of Sexuality: Lessons for Anthropology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 32 (1):110-122.
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  5. Robert A. Paul (1980). Symbolic Interpretation in Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 8 (4):286-294.
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  6. Sara E. Lewis (2010). Culture, Subject, and Psyche: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. Anthony Molino, Ed. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004. Xv + 217 Pp. [REVIEW] Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (1):1-3.
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  7. P. Steven Sandgren (2004). Psychoanalysis and Its Resistances in Michel Foucault's The History of Sexuality: Lessons for Anthropology. Ethos 32 (1):110-122.
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  8. Robert A. Paul (1980). Symbolic Interpretation in Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. Ethos 8 (4):286-294.
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  9.  1
    Stephanie Swales Scalambrino (2014). Philippe van Haute and Tomas Geyskens , A Non-Oedipal Psychoanalysis? A Clinical Anthropology of Hysteria in the Works of Freud and Lacan . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 34 (3-4):174-176.
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  10. Sara E. Lewis (2010). Culture, Subject, and Psyche: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. Anthony Molino, Ed. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2004. Xv + 217 Pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 38 (1):1-3.
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  11. James Weiner (1999). Psychoanalysis and Anthropology: On the Temporality of Analysis. In Henrietta L. Moore (ed.), Anthropological Theory Today. Polity Press 234--261.
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  12.  9
    Corin Braga (2010). Carlos Castaneda: The Uses and Abuses of Ethnomethodology and Emic Studies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (27):71-106.
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Carlos Castaneda’s books and his New Age shamanistic religion raise, beyond the controversy regarding the counterfeit character of his ethnographic narrative and charlatanism, several methodological problems. Educated within the emerging paradigm of emic studies and ethnomethodoly of the 1960s, Castaneda used it in order to set a very clever methodological (...)
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  13.  2
    Talia Welsh (ed.) (2010). Child Psychology and Pedagogy: The Sorbonne Lectures 1949-1952. Northwestern University Press.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty is one of the few major phenomenologists to engage extensively with empirical research in the sciences, and the only one to examine child psychology with rigor and in such depth. His writings have recently become increasingly influential, as the findings of psychology and cognitive science inform and are informed by phenomenological inquiry. Merleau-Ponty’s Sorbonne lectures of 1949 to 1952 are a broad investigation into child psychology, psychoanalysis, pedagogy, phenomenology, sociology, and anthropology. They argue that the subject (...)
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  14.  16
    Peter Homans (1989). The Ability to Mourn: Disillusionment and the Social Origins of Psychoanalysis. University of Chicago Press.
    Peter Homans offers a new understanding of the origins of psychoanalysis and relates the psychoanalytic project as a whole to the sweep of Western culture, past and present. He argues that Freud's fundamental goal was the interpretation of culture and that, therefore, psychoanalysis is fundamentally a humanistic social science. To establish this claim, Homans looks back at Freud's self-analysis in light of the crucial years from 1906 to 1914 when the psychoanalytic movement was formed and shows how these (...)
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  15.  51
    Christian Lotz (2005). From Nature to Culture? Diogenes and Philosophical Anthropology. Human Studies 28 (1):41 - 56.
    This essay is concerned with the central issue of philosophical anthropology: the relation between nature and culture. Although Rousseau was the first thinker to introduce this topic within the modern discourse of philosophy and the cultural sciences, it has its origin in Diogenes the Cynic, who was a disciple of Socrates. In my essay I (1) historically introduce a few aspects of philosophical anthropology, (2) deal with the nature–culture exchange, as introduced in Kant, then I (3) relate this (...)
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  16.  45
    Mark Bevir (2004). The Unconscious in Social Explanation. Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):181-207.
    The proper range and content of the unconscious in the human sciences should be established by reference to its conceptual relationship to the folk psychology that informs the standard form of explanation therein. A study of this relationship shows that human scientists should appeal to the unconscious only when the language of the conscious fails them, i.e. typically when they find a conflict between people's self-understanding and their actions. This study also shows that human scientists should adopt a broader concept (...)
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  17.  8
    David Roediger (2013). A Note on Psychoanalysis and the Critical Study of Whiteness. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):345-348.
    This brief response to John Abromeit’s “Whiteness as a Form of Bourgeois Anthropology?” takes up the ways in which, beyond Horkheimer, the Frankfurt School and psychoanalysis have shaped Roediger’s historical writings on whiteness. In particular, it considers as inspirations for those writings the work of Herbert Marcuse, Wilhelm Reich, George Rawick, and the surrealist tradition.
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  18. Katie Gentile (ed.) (2015). The Business of Being Made: The Temporalities of Reproductive Technologies, in Psychoanalysis and Culture. Routledge.
    _The Business of Being Made_ is the first book to critically analyze assisted reproductive technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective integrating psychoanalytic and cultural theories. It is a ground-breaking collection exploring ARTs through diverse methods including interview research, clinical case studies, psychoanalytic based ethnography, and memoir. Gathering clinicians and researchers who specialize in this area, this book engages current research in psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, philosophy and debates in feminist, queer and cultural theory about affect, temporality, and bodies. With (...) as its fulcrum, _The Business of Being Made_ explores the social constructions and personal experiences of ARTs. Katie Gentile frames the cultural context, exploring the ways ARTs have become a complex form of playing with time, attempting to manufacture a hopeful future in the midst of growing global uncertainty. The contributors then present a range of varied experiences related to ARTs, including: Interviews with women and men undergoing ARTs; A psychoanalytic memoir of male infertility; Clinical research and work with transgender, gay and lesbian patients creating new Oedipal constellations, the experiences of LBGTQ people within the medical system and the variety of families that emerge; Research on the experiences of egg donors and a corresponding clinical case study of successful egg donation; The experiences of ongoing failure which is the often unacknowledged for ART procedures; How and when people choose to stop using ARTs; A psychoanalytic ethnography of a neonatal intensive care unit populated in part with the babies created through these technologies and their parents, haggard and in shock after years of failed attempts. Full of original material, _The Business of Being Made_ conveys the ambivalence of these technologies without simplifying their complicated consequences for the bodies of individuals, the family, cultures, and our planet. This book will be relevant to clinicians, medical and psychological personnel working in assisted reproductive technologies and infertility, as well as academics working in the fields of sociology, literature, queer and feminist theories and at the intersections of cultural, critical and psychoanalytic theories. (shrink)
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  19. Michael Munchow & Sonu Shamdasani (eds.) (2002). Speculations After Freud: Psychoanalysis, Philosophy and Culture. Routledge.
    Psychoanalysis has transformed our culture. We constantly use and refer to ideas from psychoanalysis, often unconsciously. Psychology, philosophy, politics, sociology, women's studies, anthropology, literary studies, cultural studies, and other disciplines have been permeated by the competing schools of psychoanalysis. But what of psychoanalysis itself? Where is it going one hundred years after Freud's own speculations took shape? Does it still have a role to play in cultural debate, or should it perhaps be abandoned? _Speculations After (...)
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  20. Michael Munchow & Sonu Shamdasani (eds.) (1994). Speculations After Freud: Psychoanalysis, Philosophy and Culture. Routledge.
    Psychoanalysis has transformed our culture. We constantly use and refer to ideas from psychoanalysis, often unconsciously. Psychology, philosophy, politics, sociology, women's studies, anthropology, literary studies, cultural studies, and other disciplines have been permeated by the competing schools of psychoanalysis. But what of psychoanalysis itself? Where is it going one hundred years after Freud's own speculations took shape? Does it still have a role to play in cultural debate, or should it perhaps be abandoned? _Speculations After (...)
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  21. Jerome A. Winer (1993). The Annual of Psychoanalysis, V. 21. Routledge.
    Volume 21 of _The Annual of Psychoanalysis_ is especially welcome for bringing to English-language readers timely contributions from abroad in an opening section on "Psychoanalysis in Europe." The section begins with a translation of Helmut Thomae's substantial critique of the current state of psychoanalytic education; Thomae's proposal for comprehensive reform revolves around a redefinition of the status of the training analysis in analytic training. Diane L'Heureux-Le Beuf's clinical diary of an analysis focusing on the narcissistic elements of oedipal conflict (...)
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  22. Éric Smadja (2009). Le Complexe d'Œdipe, Cristallisateur du Débat Psychanalyse/Anthropologie. Presses Universitaires de France.
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  23.  2
    Naomi Quinn (2004). Psychodynamic Universals, Cultural Particulars in Feminist Anthropology: Rethinking Hua Gender Beliefs. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 32 (4):493-513.
  24.  34
    Harvey Mullane (1965). Unconscious Emotion. Theoria 31 (3):181-190.
  25. Vinicio Busacchi (2008). Ricoeur Versus Freud: Due Concezioni Dell'uomo a Confronto. Rubbettino.
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  26. Jean-Pierre Lebrun (2010). La Condition Humaine N'est Pas Sans Conditions. Denoël.
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  27.  7
    C. Jason Throop (2012). On Inaccessibility and Vulnerability: Some Horizons of Compatibility Between Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (1):75-96.
  28.  10
    Byron J. Good (2012). Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and Subjectivity in Java. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (1):24-36.
  29.  4
    Thomas J. Csordas (2012). Psychoanalysis and Phenomenology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (1):54-74.
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  30.  1
    Katherine P. Ewing (1987). Clinical Psychoanalysis as an Ethnographic Tool. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 15 (1):16-39.
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  31.  1
    Jeffrey Bass (2006). In Exile From the Self: National Belonging and Psychoanalysis in Buenos Aires. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 34 (4):433-455.
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  32.  28
    Jean-Joseph Goux (1993). Oedipus, Philosopher. Stanford University Press.
    If the logic of the Oedipus myth were subjected to rigorous and thoroughgoing analysis with the tools of anthropology, comparative mythology, and narratology, might it invalidate the approach to the 'Oedipus complex' that Freud derived from his psychoanalytic experience? This book answers 'yes', arguing that instead of the Oedipus complex explaining the myth, the Oedipus myth explains the complex. The author argues that the Oedipus myth is an historical anomaly, a myth of failed royal investiture or of avoided masculine (...)
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  33.  6
    John M. Ingham (2011). The Child: An Encyclopedic Companion. Richard A. Shweder, Ed. Chicago: Chicago University Press. 2009. Xxxvii + 1105 Pp. Theme: Personality Development and Psychoanalysis. [REVIEW] Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (4):1-3.
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  34.  11
    John Abromeit (2013). Whiteness as a Form of Bourgeois Anthropology? Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):325-343.
    In his pathbreaking analysis of the formation of an ideological “white” self-consciousness among American workers in the nineteenth century, David Roediger relies on a theoretical synthesis of historical materialism and psychoanalysis. This paper explores the parallels in methodology and content between Roediger’s work and the critical theory of Max Horkheimer, Erich Fromm, and Herbert Marcuse, which was also based on a synthesis of Marx and Freud. The paper seeks to place Roediger’s arguments in a broader theoretical context and to (...)
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  35.  1
    Robert A. Paul (1987). The Question of Applied Psychoanalysis and the Interpretation of Cultural Symbolism. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 15 (1):82-103.
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  36.  2
    Michael P. Carroll (1992). Folklore and Psychoanalysis: The Swallowing Monster and Open‐Brains Allomotifs in Plains Indian Mythology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 20 (3):289-303.
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  37.  2
    Ellen Ramvi (2012). A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M8.
    This article focuses on what both psychoanalysis and anthropology have in common: the emphasis on the researcher's own experience. An ethnographic fieldwork will be used to illustrate how a psychoanalytical approach unfolds the material when studying conditions for learning from experience among teachers in two Norwegian junior high schools, and also the strong methodological implications of this approach. The researcher's struggle to remain open is elaborated. Here "openness" is regarded as something more than a principle for research practice. (...)
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  38. Donald N. Levine (1978). Psychoanalysis and Sociology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 6 (3):175-185.
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  39. Henrietta L. Moore (1992). Anthropology and Cross‐Cultural Analysis. In Elizabeth Wright (ed.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Critical Dictionary. Blackwell 3--9.
     
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  40. Richard Pottinger (1987). The Self in Cultural Adaptation: Heinz Kohut's Psychoanalysis of Time and Change in East Africa. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 15 (3):296-319.
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  41.  2
    Mary C. Rawlinson (ed.) (2016). Engaging the World: Thinking After Irigaray. State University of New York Press.
    Engaging the World explores Luce Irigaray’s writings on sexual difference, deploying the resources of her work to rethink philosophical concepts and commitments and expose new possibilities of vitality in relationship to nature, others, and to one’s self. The contributors present a range of perspectives from multiple disciplines such as philosophy, literature, education, evolutionary theory, sound technology, science and technology, anthropology, and psychoanalysis. They place Irigaray in conversation with thinkers as diverse as Charles Darwin, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Gilles Deleuze, René (...)
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  42. John Gale, Michael Robson & Georgia Rapsomatioti (eds.) (2013). Insanity and Divinity: Studies in Psychosis and Spirituality. Routledge.
    How close is spirituality to psychosis? Covering the interrelation of psychosis and spirituality from a number of angles, _Insanity and Divinity_ will generate dialogue and discussion, aid critical reflection and stimulate creative approaches to clinical work for those interested in the connections between religious studies, psychoanalysis, anthropology and hagiography. Bringing together an international range of contributors and covering many different types of religious experience, this book presents its theme in three parts: Psychoanalysis, belief and mysticism Anthropology, (...)
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  43.  3
    Geoffrey Galt Harpham (2002). Language Alone: The Critical Fetish of Modernity. Routledge.
    How did the concept of language come to dominate modern intellectual history? In Language Alone , Geoffrey Galt Harpham provides at once the most comprehensive survey and most telling critique of the pervasive role of language in modern thought. He shows how thinkers in such diverse fields as philosophy, psychoanalysis, anthropology, and literary theory have made progress by referring their most difficult theoretical problems to what they presumed were the facts of language. Through a provocative reassessment of major (...)
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  44. Michael Stephan (2016). A Transformation Theory of Aesthetics. Routledge.
    First published in 1990. How we perceive and respond to the visual image has been traditional concern of psychologists, philosophers and art historians. Today, where the visual image increasingly permeates our everyday life and consciousness, the question becomes ever more relevant. How do we, for instance, instinctively ‘know’ what it is that a picture represents without having to be taught? How it is that we experience pleasure in looking at certain pictures? How is it that we often want to talk (...)
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  45.  67
    Immanuel Kant (2006). Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View. Cambridge University Press.
    Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View essentially reflects the last lectures Kant gave for his annual course in anthropology, which he taught from 1772 until his retirement in 1796. The lectures were published in 1798, with the largest first printing of any of Kant's works. Intended for a broad audience, they reveal not only Kant's unique contribution to the newly emerging discipline of anthropology, but also his desire to offer students a practical view of the world (...)
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  46. Jim Hopkins (forthcoming). The Significance of Consilience: Psychoanalysis, Attachment, Neuroscience, and Evolution. In L. Brakel & V. Talvete (eds.), Psychoanalysis and Philosophy of Mind: Unconscious mentality in the 21st century. Karnac
    This paper considers clinical psychoanalysis together with developmental psychology (particularly attachment theory), evolution, and neuroscience in the context a Bayesian account of confirmation and disconfrimation. -/- In it I argue that these converging sources of support indicate that the combination of relatively low predictive power and broad explanatory scope that characterise the theories of both Freud and Darwin suggest that Freud's theory, like Darwin's, may strike deeply into natural phenomena. -/- The same argument, however, suggests that conclusive confirmation for (...)
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  47.  93
    Jim Hopkins (2016). Free Energy and Virtual Reality in Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience: A Complexity Theory of Dreaming and Mental Disorder. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    This paper compares the free energy neuroscience now advocated by Karl Friston and his colleagues with that hypothesised by Freud, arguing that Freud's notions of conflict and trauma can be understood in terms of computational complexity. It relates Hobson and Friston's work on dreaming and the reduction of complexity to contemporary accounts of dreaming and the consolidation of memory, and advances the hypothesis that mental disorder can be understood in terms of computational complexity and the mechanisms, including synaptic pruning, that (...)
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  48.  12
    Ian Skoggard & Alisse Waterston (2015). Introduction: Toward an Anthropology of Affect and Evocative Ethnography. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):109-120.
    A growing interest in affect holds much promise for anthropology by providing a new frame to examine and articulate subjective and intersubjective states, which are key parts of human consciousness and behavior. Affect has its roots in the social, an observation that did not go unnoticed by Durkheim and since then has been kept in view by those social scientists interested in the emotions, feelings, and subjectivity. However, the challenge for ethnographers has always been to articulate in words and (...)
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  49.  64
    Rita Astuti, Jonathan P. Parry & Charles Stafford (eds.) (2007). Questions of Anthropology. Berg.
    Anthropology today seems to shy away from the big, comparative questions that ordinary people in many societies find compelling. Questions of Anthropology brings these issues back to the centre of anthropological concerns. Individual essays explore birth, death and sexuality, puzzles about the relationship between science and religion, questions about the nature of ritual, work, political leadership and genocide, and our personal fears and desires, from the quest to control the future and to find one's "true" identity to the (...)
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  50. Tim Jankowiak & Eric Watkins (2014). Meat on the Bones: Kant's Account of Cognition in the Anthropology Lectures. In Alix Cohen (ed.), Kant's Lectures on Anthropology: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press 57-75.
    This chapter describes Immanuel Kant's conception of anthropology and the most basic distinctions he draws when invoking faculties throughout the anthropology transcripts. It explains Kant's account of the objective senses (hearing, sight, and touch), and shows that the sensory material provided by these senses are empirical conditions of experience that supplement the a priori conditions articulated in the Critique of Pure Reason. The chapter also describes some of the central details of Kant's account of the imagination, focusing on (...)
     
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