Search results for 'Psychoanalysis and feminism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 150.0
  2. Teresa Brennan (ed.) (1989). Between Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 63.0
    In this landmark collection of original essays, outstanding feminist critics in Britain, France, and the United States present new perspectives on feminism and ...
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  3. Mari Jo Buhle (1998). Feminism and its Discontents: A Century of Struggle with Psychoanalysis. Harvard University Press.score: 63.0
    An ambitious and highly engaging history of ideas, Feminism and Its Discontents brings together far-flung intellectual tendencies rarely seen in intimate ...
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  4. Richard Feldstein & Judith Roof (eds.) (1989). Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  5. Elizabeth Wright (ed.) (1992). Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Critical Dictionary. Blackwell.score: 60.0
  6. Jerry Aline Flieger (1989). Entertaining the Menage a Trois: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Literature. In Richard Feldstein & Judith Roof (eds.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Cornell University Press.score: 57.0
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  7. Jacqueline Rose (1989). Where Does the Misery Come From? Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and the Event. In Richard Feldstein & Judith Roof (eds.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Cornell University Press. 25--39.score: 57.0
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  8. Louise Gyler (2010). The Gendered Unconscious: Can Gender Discourses Subvert Psychoanalysis? Routledge.score: 51.0
    This book investigates the nature of Feminist interventions in psychoanalysis by comparing the status and treatment of women in two different psychoanalytic ...
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  9. Dorothy Leland (1989). Lacanian Psychoanalysis and French Feminism: Toward an Adequate Political Psychology. Hypatia 3 (3):81 - 103.score: 48.0
    This paper examines some French feminist uses of Lacanian psychoanalysis. I focus on two Lacanian influenced accounts of psychological oppression, the first by Luce Irigaray and the second by Julia Kristeva, and I argue that these accounts fail to meet criteria for an adequate political psychology.
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  10. Jane Flax (1992). [Book Review] Thinking Fragments, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Postmodernism in the Contemporary West. [REVIEW] Feminist Studies 18.score: 48.0
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  11. Jane Gallop (1989). The Monster in the Mirror: The Feminist Critic's Psychoanalysis. In Richard Feldstein & Judith Roof (eds.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis. Cornell University Press. 13--24.score: 48.0
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  12. Biodun Iginla (1992). Black Feminist Critique of Psychoanalysis'. In Elizabeth Wright (ed.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Critical Dictionary. Blackwell.score: 48.0
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  13. Renata Salecl (1994). The Spoils of Freedom: Psychoanalysis, Feminism and Ideology After the Fall of Socialism. Routledge.score: 48.0
    The rise of nationalist, racist and anti-feminist ideologies is one of the most frightening repercussions of the collapse of socialism. Using psychoanalytic theories of fantasy to investigate why such extremist ideologies have taken hold, Renata Salecl argues that the major social and political changes in post-communist Eastern Europe require a radical re-evaluation of notions of liberal theories of democracy. In doing so she offers a new approach to human rights and feminism grounded in her own active partipation in the (...)
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  14. Rosalind Minsky (1996). Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader. Routledge.score: 45.0
    What is object-relations theory and what does it have to do with literary studies? How can Freud's phallocentric theories be applied by feminist critics? In Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader Rosalind Minsky answers these questions and more, offering students a clear, straightforward overview without ever losing them in jargon. In the first section Minsky outlines the fundamentals of the theory, introducing the key thinkers and providing clear commentary. In the second section, the theory is demonstratedn by an anthology (...)
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  15. Kirsten Campbell (2004). Jacques Lacan and Feminist Epistemology. Routledge.score: 45.0
    In this ground breaking new book, Kirsten Campbell takes up the debate, but instead of asking what feminist politics is or should be, she examines how feminism changes the ways we understand ourselves and others. Using Lacanian psychoanalysis as a starting point, Campbell examines contemporary feminism's turn to accounts of feminist "knowing" to create new conceptions of the political, before going on to develop a theory of that feminist knowing as political practice in itself.
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  16. Jessica Benjamin (1997). Shadow of the Other: Intersubjectivity and Gender in Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 45.0
    Shadow of the Other is a discussion of how the individual has two sorts of relationships with an "other"--other individuals. The first regards the other as a s work apart is her brilliant utilization of a systematic dialectical approach to her subject, always maintaining the delicate balance between opposing tensions: masculinity and femininity, subjectivity and objectivity, passivity and activity, love and aggression, fantasy and reality, modernism and postmodernism, the intrapsychic and the intersubjective. Benjamin s work apart is her brilliant utilization (...)
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  17. Ann Pellegrini (1997). Performance Anxieties: Staging Psychoanalysis, Staging Race. Routledge.score: 45.0
    Performance Anxieties looks at the on-going debates over the value of psychoanalysis for feminist theory and politics--specifically concerning the social and psychical meanings of racialization. Beginning with an historicized return to Freud and the meaning of Jewishness in Freud's day, Ann Pellegrini indicates how "race" and racialization are not incidental features of psychoanalysis or of modern subjectivity, but are among the generative conditions of both. Performance Anxieties stages a series of playful encounters between elite and popular performance texts--Freud (...)
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  18. Jan Campbell (2000). Arguing with the Phallus: Feminist, Queer, and Postcolonial Theory: A Psychoanalytic Contribution. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by St. Martin's Press.score: 45.0
    What can psychoanalysis offer contemporary arguments in the fields of Feminism, Queer Theory and Post-Colonialism? Jan Campbell introduces and analyses the way that psychoanalysis has developed and made problematic models of subjectivity linked to issues of sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and history. Via discussions of such influential and diverse figures as Lacan, Irigaray, Kristeva, Dollimore, Bhabha, Toni Morrison, and Alice Walker, Campbell uses psychoanalysis as a mediatory tool in a range of debates across the human sciences, while (...)
     
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  19. Alison Stone (2011). Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Routledge.score: 39.0
    In this book, Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless strive to (...)
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  20. Sarah Richmond (2001). Psychoanalysis and Feminism: Anorexia, the Social World, and the Internal World. Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (1):1-12.score: 36.0
  21. Diana T. Meyers (1994). Subjection & Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism & Moral Philosophy. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Subjection and Subjectivity offers an account of moral subjectivity and moral reflection designed to meet the needs of feminism, as well as other emancipatory movements. Diana Tietjens Meyers argues that impartial reason--the appraoch to moral reflection which has dominated 20th century Anglo-American philosophy and judicial reasoning--is inadequate for addressing real world injustices. Dealing with the problems of group-based social exclusion requires empathy with others. But empathy often becomes distorted by prejudicial attitudes which may be publicly condemned but continue to (...)
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  22. Lois McNay (1994). Reviews : Elizabeth Wright (Ed.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Critical Diction Ary. Oxford: Blackwell, 1992. £60, Paper, £16.95, Xix + 485 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (1):128-130.score: 36.0
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  23. Elaine Hoffman Baruch (1996). She Speaks/He Listens: Women on the French Analyst's Couch. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Although much attention has been given to Jacques Lacan in his rereading of Freud and to French women analysts in their deconstruction of traditional psychoanalysis, little has been available in the US on contemporary male French analysts and their treatment of women. She Speaks/He Listens illustrates the range of thought among some well-known French male psychoanalysts today--from Lacanians to anti-Lacanians to eclectics--with regard to women and sexual difference. Through the interview format, with its possibilities for surprise and spontaneity, the (...)
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  24. Cynthia Burack (2004). Healing Identities: Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups. Cornell University Press.score: 36.0
    Psychoanalysis, race, and racism -- From psychoanalysis to political theory -- Reparative group leadership -- Conflict and authenticity -- Bonding and solidarity -- Coalitions and reparative politics.
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  25. Marilyn Nissim-Sabat (1991). The Crisis in Psychoanalysis: Resolution Through Husserlian Phenomenology and Feminism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 14 (1):33 - 66.score: 36.0
  26. Elisabeth Young-Bruehl & Laura Wexler (forthcoming). On" Psychoanalysis and Feminism". Social Research.score: 36.0
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  27. Roberta Davidson (1993). The Gendering of Melancholia: Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and the Symbolics of Loss in Renaissance Literature (Review). Philosophy and Literature 17 (1):179-180.score: 36.0
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  28. S. D. Richmond (2002). Psychoanalysis and Feminism: Explaining Anorexia. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (1):1-12.score: 36.0
  29. Christine Battersby (2012). Alison Stone, Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Radical Philosophy 174:40.score: 36.0
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  30. Jane Gallop (1987). Reading the Mother Tongue: Psychoanalytic Feminist Criticism in The Trial (s) of Psychoanalysis. Critical Inquiry 13 (2):314-329.score: 36.0
     
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  31. N. Gold (1998). Psychoanalysis, Historiography and Feminist Theory: The Search for Critical Method. By Katherine Kearns. The European Legacy 3:135-135.score: 36.0
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  32. E. A. Grosz (1990). Jacques Lacan: A Feminist Introduction. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Grosz gives a critical overview of Lacan's work from a feminist perspective. Discussing previous attempts to give a feminist reading of his work, she argues for women's autonomy based on an indifference to the Lacanian phallus.
     
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  33. K. W. Leng (2000). On the Proper Status of Unspeakably Bad Objects: Universalism in Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalysis in Feminism. Theory, Culture and Society 17 (5):27-54.score: 36.0
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  34. E. Long (1974). Psychoanalysis and Feminism. Telos 1974 (20):183-189.score: 36.0
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  35. John O'Neill (2001). Psychoanalysis and Sociology: From Freudo-Marxism to Freudo-Feminism. In Barry Smart & George Ritzer (eds.), Handbook of Social Theory. Sage. 112--124.score: 36.0
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  36. M. Poster (1974). Psychoanalysis and Feminism. Telos 1974 (21):213-219.score: 36.0
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  37. Renata Schlesier (1984). On the Alleged Demise of Vaginal Sexuality: A Mournful Account of the Relationship Between Psychoanalysis and Feminism. Telos 1984 (59):101-118.score: 36.0
    Is there vaginal orgasm or not? This question and the answers it has evoked have caused considerable confusion. The debate involves instincts and erogenic zones as well as the potential of female sexuality. At stake is not only the determination of the decisive erogenic zone in female sexuality but also, the extent to which female sexuality is susceptible to repression, the relation between social repression and the repression of sexuality, the specific understanding by women of their own needs and bodies, (...)
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  38. L. Segal (1994). Hiding Out or Moving on-Feminism in Psychoanalysis. Radical Philosophy 68:1-2.score: 36.0
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  39. Jane Flax (1993). Disputed Subjects: Essays on Psychoanalysis, Politics, and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 33.0
  40. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 27.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and (...)
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  41. Ranjana Khanna (2003). Dark Continents: Psychoanalysis and Colonialism. Duke University Press.score: 27.0
    Genealogies -- Psychoanalysis and archaeology -- Freud in the sacred grove -- Colonial rescriptings -- War, decolonization, psychoanalysis -- Colonial melancholy -- Haunting and the future -- The ethical ambiguities of transnational feminism -- Hamlet in the colonial archive.
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  42. Sonya Andermahr (1997). A Glossary of Feminist Theory. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.score: 27.0
    This glossary is both an introduction to the key words of feminist critical theories and a guide to their origins. Acknowledging the variety of contemporary feminist theories, the glossary includes entries on black, post-colonial, Italian, and French feminisms, and draws on a wide range of fields including semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction.
     
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  43. Kohei Furuya (2011). Why Is Touch Sometimes So Touching?: The Phenomenology of Touch in Susan Streitfeld's Female Perversions. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):63-81.score: 27.0
    The film Female Perversions (1996) has received mixed reviews in newspapers and popular magazines. Critics have made appreciative comments on the powerful feminist message of the film, while many reviews registered frustration at the overuse of vulgarised Freudian psychoanalytic discourses in the film. Apart from those film reviews, however, many viewers have been somehow touched by the film and especially by the last scene, in which Eve physically ‘touches’ a girl’s face—though they do not know exactly why they felt the (...)
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  44. Margaret Whitford (1991). Luce Irigaray: Philosophy in the Feminine. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Margaret Whitford's study provides the ideal introduction to Irigaray's thought, offering a sustained interpretation of her whole corpus, including previously untranslated French texts. Whitford suggests that Irigaray's work should be seen as "philosophy in the feminine," actively opposing the complicity of philosophy with other social practices which exclude or marginalize women.
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  45. Sarah K. Donovan, Luce Irigaray. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
  46. Kelly Oliver (ed.) (1993). Ethics, Politics, and Difference in Julia Kristeva's Writings. Routledge.score: 24.0
    A valuable intervention in Kristevan scholarship and a significant and exciting contribution in its own right to post-structuralist discussions of ethical and political agency and practice. Contributors: Judith Butler, Tina Chanter, Marilyn Edelstein, Jean Graybeal, Suzanne Guerlac, Alice Jardine, Lisa Lowe, Noelle McAfee, Norma Claire Moruzzi, Kelly Oliver, Tilottma Rajan, Jacqueline Rose, Allison Weir, Mary Bittner Wiseman, Ewa Ziarek.
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  47. Erica Burman (2013). Conceptual Resources for Questioning 'Child as Educator'. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):229-243.score: 24.0
  48. Ce Cāratāmpāḷ (2005). Peṇṇiya Uḷappakuppạyvum Peṇ El̲uttum. Ulakat Tamil̲ārāycci Nir̲uvan̲am.score: 24.0
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  49. Nicholas Smith (forthcoming). Disavowal, Ignorance and the Colonial Difference: Rethinking Phenomenology From the Start. In Délia Popa Maria Gyemant (ed.), Approches phénoménologiques de l’inconscient. Georg Olms.score: 24.0
     
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  50. Robin James (2011). &Quot;feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'&Quot;. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.score: 21.0
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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