Search results for 'Psychoanalytic interpretation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marcus Verhaegh (2001). Hypothetical and Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:295-305.score: 58.0
    I develop the concept of hypothetical interpretation to give an account of certain problematic interpretive practices within a broadly Gricean framework. These practices attempt to find neither speaker nor linguistic meaning but rather, seek to discover such things as the unconscious beliefs of a text’s producer. In developing the concept of hypothetical interpretation, I consider in particular the question of their plausibility. I show how the plausibility of a hypothetical interpretation can be taken as providing evidence about (...)
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  2. Alan Bass (2006). Interpretation and Difference: The Strangeness of Care. Stanford University Press.score: 51.0
    This book is the companion to Difference and Disavowal: The Trauma of Eros (Stanford University Press, 2000), which dealt with the psychoanalytic clinical problem of resistance to interpretation. The key to this resistance is the unconscious registration and repudiation (disavowal) of the reality of difference. The surprising generality of this resistance intersects with Nietzsche's, Heidegger's, and Derrida's understanding of how and why difference is in general the “unthought of metaphysics.” All three see metaphysics engaged with a “registration and (...)
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  3. Adrian Stokes (1959). Form in Art: A Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (2):193-203.score: 45.0
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  4. Frank Cioffi (2001). The Rationale for Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Psychological Inquiry 12 (3):161-166.score: 45.0
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  5. Rebecca Dalvesco (forthcoming). Jean Cocteau's Orpheus: A Semiotic and Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Semiotics:207-214.score: 45.0
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  6. P. J. Gibbs (1997). A Psychoanalytic Interpretation of the Effectiveness of Humor in Teaching Philosophy. Journal of Thought 32:123-133.score: 45.0
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  7. David Stanley Caudill (1997). Lacan and the Subject of Law: Toward a Psychoanalytic Critical Legal Theory. Humanities Press.score: 39.0
  8. Simon Clarke (2003). Psychoanalytic Sociology and the Interpretation of Emotion. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (2):145–163.score: 36.0
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  9. Eileen Barner (1975). Ideology and Social Knowledge. Harold J. Bershady. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, I973. Pp. I78. £3.25. Psychoanalytic Sociology : An Essay on the Interpretation of Historical and the Phenomena of Collective Behaviour. Fred Weinstein and Gerald M. Platt. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, I973. Pp. XI+I24. $8.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (2):215-221.score: 36.0
  10. Robin Scroggs (1978). The Heuristic Value of a Psychoanalytic Model in the Interpretation of Pauline Theology. Zygon 13 (2):136-157.score: 36.0
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  11. Rachel B. Blass (1994). Is Psychoanalytic Dream Interpretation Possible? Pragmatics and Cognition 2 (1):71-94.score: 36.0
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  12. Waud Kracke & Gilbert Herdt (1987). Introduction: Interpretation in Psychoanalytic Anthropology. Ethos 15 (1):3-7.score: 36.0
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  13. Tim-Hung Ku (2007). Psychoanalytic Semiotics and the Interpretation of Dream Paintings. American Journal of Semiotics 23 (1/4):303-336.score: 36.0
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  14. Bent Rosenbaum (2003). The Unconscious: How Does It Speak to Us Today? Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review 26 (1):31-40.score: 33.0
  15. Mark Solms (2000). A Psychoanalytic Contribution to Contemporary Neuroscience. In Max Velmans (ed.), Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness: New Methodologies and Maps. John Benjamins. 67-95.score: 33.0
  16. Hugo Bleichmar (2004). Making Conscious the Unconscious in Order to Modify Unconscious Processing: Some Mechanisms of Therapeutic Change. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 85 (6):1379-1400.score: 30.0
  17. Mick Power (2000). Freud and the Unconscious. The Psychologist. Special Issue 13 (12):612-614.score: 30.0
  18. Edgar Levenson (2001). The Enigma of the Unconscious. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (2):239-252.score: 30.0
  19. Karin Mogg, Lusia Stopa & Brendan P. Bradley (2001). From the Conscious Into the Unconscious: What Can Cognitive Theories of Psychopathology Learn From Freudian Theory? Psychological Inquiry 12 (3):139-143.score: 30.0
  20. Jerome Neu (2002). An Ethics of Fantasy? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):133-157.score: 30.0
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  21. Gladys B. Guarton (2001). Unconscious Learning and Conscious Choice: Commentary on Levenson's Essay. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (2):253-263.score: 30.0
  22. David Rosenfeld (1988). Psychoanalysis and Groups: History and Dialectics. Karnac Books.score: 30.0
  23. Ranyard West (1974). International Law and Psychology. Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.,Oceana Publications.score: 30.0
  24. Brian M. D. Johnson (2011). Psychoanalytic Treatment of Psychological Addiction to Alcohol (Alcohol Abuse). Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 27.0
    The DSM-V Committee plans to abolish the distinction between Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Dependence (DSM5.org). The author presents a case report as a proof of concept that this distinction should be retained. The author has asserted that Alcohol Abuse is a purely psychological addiction, while Alcohol Dependence involves capture of the ventral tegmental dopaminergic SEEKING system (Johnson 2003). In psychological addiction the brain can be assumed to function normally, and ordinary psychoanalytic technique can be followed. For the patient described, (...)
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  25. Siamak Movahedi (2012). Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Reported Dreams and the Problem of Double Hermeneutics in Clinical Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M12.score: 27.0
    The aim of this article is to show that statistical analysis and hermeneutics are not mutually exclusive. Although statistical analysis may capture some patterns and regularities, statistical methods may themselves generate different types of interpretation and, in turn, give rise to even more interpretations. The discussion is lodged within the context of a quantitative analysis of dream content. I attempted to examine the dialogical texts of reported dreams monologically, but soon found myself returning to dialogic contexts to make sense (...)
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  26. Kate Ince (2011). Bringing Bodies Back In: For a Phenomenological and Psychoanalytic Film Criticism of Embodied Cultural Identity. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):1-12.score: 24.0
    This article reassesses the concept of identification in line with the increased importance phenomenology has taken on in film-philosophy of the 1990s and 2000s. In the 1970s and 1980s, a Lacanian psychoanalytic interpretation of identification dominated film theory and criticism, and spectatorial engagement with elements of films was understood as what psychoanalysis calls secondary identification – the identification with stable subject-positions (characters) in the film-text. But non-Lacanian psychoanalysis and Merleau-Ponty’s existential phenomenology offer film-philosophy a very different understanding of (...)
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  27. J. Timothy Davis (2001). Revising Psychoanalytic Interpretations of the Past. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 82:449-462.score: 24.0
    The author reviews a contemporary cognitive psychology perspective on memory that views memory as being composed of multiple separate systems. Most researchers draw a fundamental distinction between declarative/explicit and non-declarative/implicit forms of memory. Declarative memory is responsible for the conscious recollection of facts and events - what is typically meant by the everyday and the common psychoanalytic use of the word ‘memory’. Non-declarative forms of memory, in contrast, are specialised processes that influence experience and behaviour without representing the past (...)
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  28. Nicholas Maxwell (2003). Art as Its Own Interpretation. In Andreea Ruvoi (ed.), Interpretation and Its Objects: Studies in the Philosophy of Michael Krausz. Rodopi.score: 21.0
    In this article I argue that a work of art provides the best interpretation of itself - more faithful than any other scholarly interpretative work.
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  29. Colin Mcginn (1986). Radical Interpretation and Epistemology. In Truth and Interpretation: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Cambridge: Blackwell.score: 21.0
    In this companion to ‘Charity, Interpretation, and Belief’, McGinn broadens his attack on Davidson's principle of charity, arguing that charity is no more required for the ascription of notional beliefs (i.e. shared concepts) than it is for the ascription of relational beliefs. His argument takes the form of a reductio: if Davidson were right that about the inherently charitable nature of interpretation, then, McGinn argues, traditional sceptical worries (e.g. concerning the external world, other minds) would not even arise. (...)
     
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  30. Jim Hopkins (1995). Wittgenstein, Interpretation, and the Foundations of Psychoanalysis. New Formations.score: 21.0
    In his work on following a rule Wittgenstein discerned principles of interpretation that apply to commonsense psychology and psychoanalysis. We can use these to assess the cogency of psychoanalytic reasoning.
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  31. William Barclay Parsons (1999). The Enigma of the Oceanic Feeling: Revisioning the Psychoanalytic Theory of Mysticism. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    This study examines the history of the psychoanalytic theory of mysticism, starting with the seminal correspondence between Freud and Romain Rolland concerning the concept of "oceanic feeling." Providing a corrective to current views which frame psychoanalysis as pathologizing mysticism, Parsons reveals the existence of three models entertained by Freud and Rolland: the classical reductive, ego-adaptive, and transformational (which allows for a transcendent dimension to mysticism). Then, reconstructing Rolland's personal mysticism (the "oceanic feeling") through texts and letters unavailable to Freud, (...)
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  32. Molly Macdonald (2013). Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit". Routledge.score: 21.0
    Both Hegel's philosophy and psychoanalytic theory have profoundly influenced contemporary thought, but they are traditionally seen to work in separate rather than intersecting universes. This book offers a new interpretation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and brings it into conversation the work of two of the best-known contemporary psychoanalysts, Christopher Bollas and André Green. Hegel and Psychoanalysis centers a consideration of the Phenomenology on the figure of the Unhappy Consciousness and the concept of Force, two areas that are (...)
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  33. Moustafa Safouan (2002). Speech or Death?: Language as Social Order: A Psychoanalytic Study. Palgrave.score: 21.0
    How is social agreement ever reached, given that the notion of intersubjectivity cannot offer an adequate account? A problem for psychoanalytic theory is that of the sovereign third person who apparently holds the balance. Using the question of ambiguity in language and interpretation in psychoanalysis, this book explores the alliance of religion and the social as they support the sacred.
     
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  34. Jim Hopkins (1999). Patterns of Interpretation: Speech, Action, and Dream. In L. Marcus (ed.), Cultural Documents: The Interpretation of Dream. Manchester University Press.score: 19.0
    Freud's account of dreams can be understood via interpretive patterns that span language and action, enabling an extension of common sense psychology that is potentially cogent, cumulative, and radical.
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  35. David Lewis (1974). Radical Interpretation. Synthese 27 (July-August):331-344.score: 18.0
    What knowledge would suffice to yield an interpretation of an arbitrary utterance of a language when such knowledge is based on evidence plausibly available to a nonspeaker of that language? it is argued that it is enough to know (1) a theory of truth for the language and (2) that the theory satisfies tarski's 'convention t' (modified to apply to natural language) and (3) that it gives an optimal fit (in a sense described) to data about sentences held true, (...)
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  36. William S. Wilkerson (2009). Is It a Choice? Sexual Orientation as Interpretation. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):97-116.score: 18.0
    Argues that choice, as a form of interpretation, is completely intertwined with the development of both sexual orientation and sexual identity. Sexual orientation is not simply a given, or determined aspect of personality.
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  37. Donald Davidson (1984). Inquiries Into Truth And Interpretation. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Now in a new edition, this volume updates Davidson's exceptional Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation (1984), which set out his enormously influential philosophy of language. The original volume remains a central point of reference, and a focus of controversy, with its impact extending into linguistic theory, philosophy of mind, and epistemology. Addressing a central question--what it is for words to mean what they do--and featuring a previously uncollected, additional essay, this work will appeal to a wide audience of philosophers, (...)
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  38. Daniel C. Dennett (1990). The Interpretation of Texts, People and Other Artifacts. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (Supplement) 50:177-194.score: 18.0
    I want to explore four different exercises of interpretation: (1) the interpretation of texts (or hermeneutics), (2) the interpretation of people (otherwise known as "attribution" psychology, or cognitive or intentional psychology), (3) the interpretation of other artifacts (which I shall call artifact hermeneutics), (4) the interpretation of organism design in evolutionary biology--the controversial interpretive activity known as adaptationism.
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  39. Antigone M. Nounou (2010). Holonomy Interpretation and Time: An Incompatible Match? A Critical Discussion of R. Healey's Gauging What's Real: The Conceptual Foundations of Contemporary Gauge Theories. Erkenntnis 72 (3):387 - 409.score: 18.0
    I argue that the Holonomy Interpretation, at least as it has been presented in Richard Healey’s Gauging What’s Real , faces serious problems. These problems are revealed when certain approximations and idealizations that are innate in the original formulation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect are thrust aside; in particular, when the temporal dimension is taken into account. There are two ways in which time re-appears in the picture: by considering complete solutions to the original problem, where the magnetic flux (...)
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  40. Federica Russo (2006). Salmon and Van Fraassen on the Existence of Unobservable Entities: A Matter of Interpretation of Probability. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 11 (3):221-247.score: 18.0
    A careful analysis of Salmon’s Theoretical Realism and van Fraassen’s Constructive Empiricism shows that both share a common origin: the requirement of literal construal of theories inherited by the Standard View. However, despite this common starting point, Salmon and van Fraassen strongly disagree on the existence of unobservable entities. I argue that their different ontological commitment towards the existence of unobservables traces back to their different views on the interpretation of probability via different conceptions of induction. In fact, inferences (...)
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  41. Erich Rast (2011). Nonindexical Context-Dependence and the Interpretation as Abduction Approach. Lodz Journal of Pragmatics 7 (2):259-279.score: 18.0
    Abstract -/- Inclusive nonindexical context-dependence occurs when the preferred interpretation of an utterance implies its lexically-derived meaning. It is argued that the corresponding processes of free or lexically mandated enrichment can be modeled as abductive inference. A form of abduction is implemented in Simple Type Theory on the basis of a notion of plausibility, which is in turn regarded a preference relation over possible worlds. Since a preordering of doxastic alternatives taken for itself only amounts to a relatively vacuous (...)
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  42. Robert Sinclair (2002). What is Radical Interpretation? Davidson, Fodor, and the Naturalization of Philosophy. Inquiry 45 (2):161-184.score: 18.0
    Jerry Fodor and Ernest Lepore have recently criticized Davidson's methodology of radical interpretation because of its apparent failure to reflect how actual interpretation is achieved. Responding to such complaints, Davidson claims that he is not interested in the empirical issues surrounding actual interpretation but instead focuses on the question of what conditions make interpretation possible. It is argued that this exchange between Fodor and Lepore on one side, and Davidson on the other, cannot be viewed simply (...)
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  43. Timothy McCarthy (2002). Radical Interpretation and Indeterminacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    McCarthy develops a theory of radical interpretation--the project of characterizing from scratch the language and attitudes of an agent or population--and applies it to the problems of indeterminacy of interpretation first described by Quine. The major theme in McCarthy's study is that a relatively modest set of interpretive principles, properly applied, can serve to resolve the major indeterminacies of interpretation.
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  44. Philipp Koralus (2013). Descriptions, Ambiguity, and Representationalist Theories of Interpretation. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):275-290.score: 18.0
    Abstract Theories of descriptions tend to involve commitments about the ambiguity of descriptions. For example, sentences containing descriptions are widely taken to be ambiguous between de re , de dicto , and intermediate interpretations and are sometimes thought to be ambiguous between the former and directly referential interpretations. I provide arguments to suggest that none of these interpretations are due to ambiguities (or indexicality). On the other hand, I argue that descriptions are ambiguous between the above family of interpretations and (...)
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  45. Wei Liu (2011). An All-Inclusive Interpretation of Aristotle's Contemplative Life. Sophia 50 (1):57-71.score: 18.0
    The debate between ‘inclusive’ and ‘dominant’ interpretations of Aristotle's concept of happiness (eudaimonia) has become one of the thorniest problems of Aristotle interpretation. In this paper, I attempt to solve this problem by presenting a multi-step argument for an ‘all-inclusive’ thesis, i.e., the Aristotelian philosopher or contemplator, in the strict sense, is someone who already possesses all the intellectual virtues (except technē), all the moral virtues (by way of the possession of phronēsis), and considerable other goods. If this thesis (...)
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  46. Aidan McGlynn (2012). Interpretation and Knowledge Maximization. Philosophical Studies 160 (3):391-405.score: 18.0
    Timothy Williamson has proposed that we should give a ‘knowledge first’ twist to David Lewis’s account of content, maintaining that for P to be the content of one’s belief is for P to be the content that would be attributed by an idealized interpreter working under certain constraints, and that the fundamental constraint on interpretation is a principle of knowledge maximization. According to this principle, an interpretation is correct to the extent that it maximizes the number of knowledgeable (...)
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  47. Kirk Ludwig, Meaning, Truth and Interpretation.score: 18.0
    We owe to Donald Davidson the suggestion that a truth theory used as an interpretation theory for a speaker can do duty as a meaning theory for his language. This is a brilliant suggestion, but there are some oddities in the development of this idea in Davidson’s work which need to be brought to light, and the project, in the form it takes in Davidson’s hands, in the end is too ambitious to succeed. I begin by distinguishing three questions: (...)
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  48. Joseph Raz (2009). Between Authority and Interpretation: On the Theory of Law and Practical Reason. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Can there be a theory of law? -- Two views of the nature of the theory of law : a partial comparison -- On the nature of law -- The problem of authority : revisiting the service conception -- About morality and the nature of law -- Incorporation by law -- Reasoning with rules -- Why interpret? -- Interpretation without retrieval -- Intention in interpretation -- Interpretation : pluralism and innovation -- On the authority and interpretation (...)
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  49. Manuel Bächtold (2008). Five Formulations of the Quantum Measurement Problem in the Frame of the Standard Interpretation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 39 (1):17 - 33.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to give a systematic account of the so-called “measurement problem” in the frame of the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. It is argued that there is not one but five distinct formulations of this problem. Each of them depends on what is assumed to be a “satisfactory” description of the measurement process in the frame of the standard interpretation. Moreover, the paper points out that each of these formulations refers not to a (...)
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  50. Marco Caracciolo (2012). Narrative, Meaning, Interpretation: An Enactivist Approach. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):367-384.score: 18.0
    After establishing its roots in basic forms of sensorimotor coupling between an organism and its environment, the new wave in cognitive science known as “enactivism” has turned to higher-level cognition, in an attempt to prove that even socioculturally mediated meaning-making processes can be accounted for in enactivist terms. My article tries to bolster this case by focusing on how the production and interpretation of stories can shape the value landscape of those who engage with them. First, it builds on (...)
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