Search results for 'Psychoanalytic interpretation' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Kevin Lynch (2014). The Vagaries of Psychoanalytic Interpretation: An Investigation Into the Causes of the Consensus Problem in Psychoanalysis. Philosophia 42 (3):779-799.score: 234.0
    Though the psychoanalytic method of interpretation is seen by psychoanalysts as a reliable scientific tool for investigating the unconscious mind, its reputation has long been marred by what’s known as the consensus problem: where different analysts fail to reach agreement when they interpret the same phenomena. This has long been thought, by both practitioners and observers of psychoanalysis, to undermine its claim to scientific status. The causes of this problem, however, are dimly understood. In this paper I attempt (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marcus Verhaegh (2001). Hypothetical and Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:295-305.score: 176.0
    I develop the concept of hypothetical interpretation to give an account of certain problematic interpretive practices within a broadly Gricean framework. These practices attempt to find neither speaker nor linguistic meaning but rather, seek to discover such things as the unconscious beliefs of a text’s producer. In developing the concept of hypothetical interpretation, I consider in particular the question of their plausibility. I show how the plausibility of a hypothetical interpretation can be taken as providing evidence about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Adrian Stokes (1959). Form in Art: A Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (2):193-203.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Frank Cioffi (2001). The Rationale for Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Psychological Inquiry 12 (3):161-166.score: 150.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. P. J. Gibbs (1997). A Psychoanalytic Interpretation of the Effectiveness of Humor in Teaching Philosophy. Journal of Thought 32:123-133.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Simon Clarke (2003). Psychoanalytic Sociology and the Interpretation of Emotion. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (2):145–163.score: 120.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Rachel B. Blass (1994). Is Psychoanalytic Dream Interpretation Possible? Pragmatics and Cognition 2 (1):71-94.score: 120.0
  8. Eileen Barner (1975). Ideology and Social Knowledge. Harold J. Bershady. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, I973. Pp. I78. £3.25. Psychoanalytic Sociology : An Essay on the Interpretation of Historical and the Phenomena of Collective Behaviour. Fred Weinstein and Gerald M. Platt. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, I973. Pp. XI+I24. $8.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (2):215-221.score: 120.0
  9. Tim-Hung Ku (2007). Psychoanalytic Semiotics and the Interpretation of Dream Paintings. American Journal of Semiotics 23 (1/4):303-336.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robin Scroggs (1978). The Heuristic Value of a Psychoanalytic Model in the Interpretation of Pauline Theology. Zygon 13 (2):136-157.score: 120.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Waud Kracke & Gilbert Herdt (1987). Introduction: Interpretation in Psychoanalytic Anthropology. Ethos 15 (1):3-7.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alan Bass (2006). Interpretation and Difference: The Strangeness of Care. Stanford University Press.score: 114.0
    This book is the companion to Difference and Disavowal: The Trauma of Eros (Stanford University Press, 2000), which dealt with the psychoanalytic clinical problem of resistance to interpretation. The key to this resistance is the unconscious registration and repudiation (disavowal) of the reality of difference. The surprising generality of this resistance intersects with Nietzsche's, Heidegger's, and Derrida's understanding of how and why difference is in general the “unthought of metaphysics.” All three see metaphysics engaged with a “registration and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Stanley Caudill (1997). Lacan and the Subject of Law: Toward a Psychoanalytic Critical Legal Theory. Humanities Press.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Mark Solms (2000). A Psychoanalytic Contribution to Contemporary Neuroscience. In Max Velmans (ed.), Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness: New Methodologies and Maps. John Benjamins. 67-95.score: 78.0
  15. Bent Rosenbaum (2003). The Unconscious: How Does It Speak to Us Today? Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review 26 (1):31-40.score: 66.0
  16. Brian M. D. Johnson (2011). Psychoanalytic Treatment of Psychological Addiction to Alcohol (Alcohol Abuse). Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 66.0
    The DSM-V Committee plans to abolish the distinction between Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Dependence (DSM5.org). The author presents a case report as a proof of concept that this distinction should be retained. The author has asserted that Alcohol Abuse is a purely psychological addiction, while Alcohol Dependence involves capture of the ventral tegmental dopaminergic SEEKING system (Johnson 2003). In psychological addiction the brain can be assumed to function normally, and ordinary psychoanalytic technique can be followed. For the patient described, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. J. Timothy Davis (2001). Revising Psychoanalytic Interpretations of the Past. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 82:449-462.score: 64.0
    The author reviews a contemporary cognitive psychology perspective on memory that views memory as being composed of multiple separate systems. Most researchers draw a fundamental distinction between declarative/explicit and non-declarative/implicit forms of memory. Declarative memory is responsible for the conscious recollection of facts and events - what is typically meant by the everyday and the common psychoanalytic use of the word ‘memory’. Non-declarative forms of memory, in contrast, are specialised processes that influence experience and behaviour without representing the past (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Hugo Bleichmar (2004). Making Conscious the Unconscious in Order to Modify Unconscious Processing: Some Mechanisms of Therapeutic Change. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 85 (6):1379-1400.score: 60.0
  19. Mick Power (2000). Freud and the Unconscious. The Psychologist. Special Issue 13 (12):612-614.score: 60.0
  20. Edgar Levenson (2001). The Enigma of the Unconscious. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (2):239-252.score: 60.0
  21. Karin Mogg, Lusia Stopa & Brendan P. Bradley (2001). From the Conscious Into the Unconscious: What Can Cognitive Theories of Psychopathology Learn From Freudian Theory? Psychological Inquiry 12 (3):139-143.score: 60.0
  22. Jerome Neu (2002). An Ethics of Fantasy? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):133-157.score: 60.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Gladys B. Guarton (2001). Unconscious Learning and Conscious Choice: Commentary on Levenson's Essay. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (2):253-263.score: 60.0
  24. Kate Ince (2011). Bringing Bodies Back In: For a Phenomenological and Psychoanalytic Film Criticism of Embodied Cultural Identity. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):1-12.score: 60.0
    This article reassesses the concept of identification in line with the increased importance phenomenology has taken on in film-philosophy of the 1990s and 2000s. In the 1970s and 1980s, a Lacanian psychoanalytic interpretation of identification dominated film theory and criticism, and spectatorial engagement with elements of films was understood as what psychoanalysis calls secondary identification – the identification with stable subject-positions (characters) in the film-text. But non-Lacanian psychoanalysis and Merleau-Ponty’s existential phenomenology offer film-philosophy a very different understanding of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Rosenfeld (1988). Psychoanalysis and Groups: History and Dialectics. Karnac Books.score: 60.0
  26. Ranyard West (1974). International Law and Psychology. Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.,Oceana Publications.score: 60.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jim Hopkins (1995). Wittgenstein, Interpretation, and the Foundations of Psychoanalysis. New Formations.score: 54.0
    In his work on following a rule Wittgenstein discerned principles of interpretation that apply to commonsense psychology and psychoanalysis. We can use these to assess the cogency of psychoanalytic reasoning.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. William Barclay Parsons (1999). The Enigma of the Oceanic Feeling: Revisioning the Psychoanalytic Theory of Mysticism. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    This study examines the history of the psychoanalytic theory of mysticism, starting with the seminal correspondence between Freud and Romain Rolland concerning the concept of "oceanic feeling." Providing a corrective to current views which frame psychoanalysis as pathologizing mysticism, Parsons reveals the existence of three models entertained by Freud and Rolland: the classical reductive, ego-adaptive, and transformational (which allows for a transcendent dimension to mysticism). Then, reconstructing Rolland's personal mysticism (the "oceanic feeling") through texts and letters unavailable to Freud, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Siamak Movahedi (2012). Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Reported Dreams and the Problem of Double Hermeneutics in Clinical Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M12.score: 54.0
    The aim of this article is to show that statistical analysis and hermeneutics are not mutually exclusive. Although statistical analysis may capture some patterns and regularities, statistical methods may themselves generate different types of interpretation and, in turn, give rise to even more interpretations. The discussion is lodged within the context of a quantitative analysis of dream content. I attempted to examine the dialogical texts of reported dreams monologically, but soon found myself returning to dialogic contexts to make sense (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Molly Macdonald (2013). Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit". Routledge.score: 54.0
    Both Hegel's philosophy and psychoanalytic theory have profoundly influenced contemporary thought, but they are traditionally seen to work in separate rather than intersecting universes. This book offers a new interpretation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and brings it into conversation the work of two of the best-known contemporary psychoanalysts, Christopher Bollas and André Green. Hegel and Psychoanalysis centers a consideration of the Phenomenology on the figure of the Unhappy Consciousness and the concept of Force, two areas that are (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Moustafa Safouan (2002). Speech or Death?: Language as Social Order: A Psychoanalytic Study. Palgrave.score: 54.0
    How is social agreement ever reached, given that the notion of intersubjectivity cannot offer an adequate account? A problem for psychoanalytic theory is that of the sovereign third person who apparently holds the balance. Using the question of ambiguity in language and interpretation in psychoanalysis, this book explores the alliance of religion and the social as they support the sacred.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. M. Eagle (1980). Psychoanalytic Interpretations: Veridicality and Therapeutic Effectiveness. Noûs 14 (3):405-425.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Andrew Goldman (1977). Psychoanalytic Interpretations: A Phenomenological Clarification. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 8 (2):164-180.score: 50.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Linda Lundgaard Andersen (2012). Interaction, Transference, and Subjectivity: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M3.score: 42.0
    Fieldwork is one of the important methods in educational, social, and organisational research. In fieldwork, the researcher takes residence for a shorter or longer period amongst the subjects and settings to be studied. The aim of this is to study the culture of people: how people seem to make sense of their lives and which moral, professional, and ethical values seem to guide their behaviour and attitudes. In fieldwork, the researcher has to balance participation and observation in her attempts at (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. [deleted]Ariane Bazan & Sandrine Detandt (2013). On the Physiology of Jouissance: Interpreting the Mesolimbic Dopaminergic Reward Functions From a Psychoanalytic Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 40.0
    Jouissance is a Lacanian concept, infamous for being impervious to understanding and which expresses the paradoxical satisfaction that a subject may derive from his symptom. On the basis of Freud’s “experience of satisfaction” we have proposed a first working definition of jouissance as the (benefit gained from) the motor tension underlying the action which was [once] adequate in bringing relief to the drive and, on the basis of their striking reciprocal resonances, we have proposed that central dopaminergic systems could embody (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Edward F. Foulks & Frances Schwartz (1982). Psychoanalytical Perspectives in Cross‐Cultural Fieldwork and Interpretation A Review Essay. Ethos 10 (3):254-278.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Paul A. Roth (1991). Truth in Interpretation: The Case of Psychoanalysis. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):175-195.score: 36.0
    This article explores and attempts to resolve some issues that arise when psychoanalytic explanations are construed as a type of historical or narrative explanation. The chief problem is this: If one rejects the claim of narratives to verisimilitude, this appears to divorce the notion of explanation from that of truth. The author examines, in particular, Donald Spence's attempt to deal with the relation of narrative explanations and truth. In his critique of Spence's distinction between narrative truth and historical truth, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Brian Garvey (2003). Darwinian Functions and Freudian Motivations. Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):427-444.score: 36.0
    Badcock, and Nesse and Lloyd, have argued that there are important points of agreement between Freud's theory of the mind and a theory of mind suggested by adaptive reasoning. Buller, on the other hand, draws attention to the need to avoid confusing an adaptive rationale with an unconscious motivation. The present paper attempts to indicate what role adaptive reasoning might have to play in justifying psychoanalytic claims. First, it is argued that psychoanalytic claims cannot be justified by the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Grigoris Vaslamatzis (2007). Framework for a New Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and Neurosciences: Is the Combined Neuro-Psychoanalytic Approach the Missing Link? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):25-.score: 36.0
    Freud's legacy deriving from his work The project for a scientific psychology (1895) could give a new impetus to the dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences. A rapproachment phase is warrented. Based on the work of psychoanalysts who are themselves neuroscientists (such as Mauro Mancia, Martha Koukkou and Harold Shevrin) or have a long term dialogue with neuroscientists (Arnold Modell), three points of epistemological congruence are described: dualism is no longer a satisfactory solutioncautions for the centrality of interpretation (hermeneutics)the self-criticism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Cord Friebe (forthcoming). Psychoanalytic Action Explanation. Philosophical Explorations:1-11.score: 30.0
    Psychoanalysis is concerned with neurotic behaviour that counts as an action if one takes into account ?repressed? mental states. Freud's paradigmatic examples are a challenge for philosophical theories of action explanation. The main problem is that such symptomatic behaviour is, in a characteristic way, irrational. In line with standard interpretations, I will recap that psychoanalytic action explanation is not in accordance with Davidson's classical reason-explanation model, and I will recall that Freud's unconsciousness is not a second mind with its (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jeff Mitchell (2000). Living a Lie: Self-Deception, Habit, and Social Roles. [REVIEW] Human Studies 23 (2):145-156.score: 30.0
    In this paper I give an account of self-deception by situating it within the theory of human conduct advanced by American pragmatists John Dewey and George Herbert Mead. After examining and rejecting the two most prevalent explanations of self-deception - namely, Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic interpretation and Jean-Paul Sartre's phenomenological one - I provide a brief sketch of some of Dewey's and Mead's fundamental insights into the inherently social nature of mind.I argue that one of the main forms of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Júlia Gyimesi (2012). Sándor Ferenczi and the Problem of Telepathy. History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):131-148.score: 30.0
    Sándor Ferenczi, the great representative of the Budapest School of Psychoanalysis, had a lifelong interest in psychical phenomena. Although his ideas on the psychoanalytical understanding of spiritualistic phenomena and telepathy were not developed theories, they had a strong influence on some representatives of psychoanalysis, and thus underlay the psychoanalytic interpretation of telepathy. Ferenczi’s ideas on telepathy were interwoven with his most important technical and theoretical innovations. Thus Ferenczi’s thoughts on telepathy say a lot about his psychoanalytical thinking and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Sara Hueso (2012). Connection and Disconnection: Value of the Analyst's Subjectivity in Elucidating Meaning in a Psychoanalytic Case Study. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M11.score: 30.0
    This article reflects on pivotal concepts of psychoanalytic practice and theory, applied to a single case study to create new meanings. Drawing from the concepts of transference, countertransference, and projective identification, the author presents the notion that the researcher's subjective reactions are created and induced by the subject of study precisely because this is one, and sometimes the only way available to the subject to communicate something that is out of its full awareness. In essence, some unconscious material can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Michael Martin (1964). The Scientific Status of Psychoanalytic Clinical Evidence (I). Inquiry 7 (1-4):13 – 36.score: 30.0
    The main source of evidence for psychoanalytic theory comes from the clinical situation. Yet recent empirical studies in verbal conditioning and the social psychology of persuasion indicate that psychoanalysts and therapists of other schools are speciously validating their own theories by unwittingly influencing their patients' behavior. In the light of this evidence it is small wonder that psychoanalysts consistently 'validate' psychoanalytic theory in their clinical practice while therapists of other schools 'validate' their own theories in their clinical practice. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Amanda Matravers & Shadd Maruna (2004). Contemporary Penality and Psychoanalysis. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):118-144.score: 30.0
    In The Culture of Control Garland describes the ?policy predicament? of late modern society as involving the normality of high crime rates and the acknowledged limitations of the criminal justice system. This combination has triggered a contradictory range of policy responses that Garland describes as adaptive and non?adaptive, with the non?adaptive responses characterised as ?denial? and ?acting out?. Garland?s invocation of these Freudian constructs invites a more fully developed psychoanalytic reading of the contemporary landscape of penal policy. Drawing on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Anna Aragno (2013). Phenomenology of Psychoanalytic Data. A Biosemiotic Framework. Biosemiotics 6 (3):473-488.score: 30.0
    In my continuing efforts to build a bridge between psychoanalytic findings and biosemiotics here, as in previous works, ‘biosemiotic’ refers to the hierarchy of meaning-forms (from biological to semiotic-organizations) underlying an updated psychoanalytic model of mind. Within this framework I present a broad range of bio-semiotic phenomena, processes, dynamics, defenses, and universal and unique internalized interpersonal patterns, that in psychoanalysis all commonly fall under the broad heading of the “Unconscious.” Reconceptualized as interpretive data within the purview of a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Elvin Aydin, Bahadir M. Gulluoglu & M. Kemal Kuscu (2012). A Psychoanalytic Qualitative Study of Subjective Life Experiences of Women With Breast Cancer. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M13.score: 30.0
    This article exemplifies research on the subjective life experiences of women with breast cancer, designed from a psychoanalytic perspective. Such research aims to reveal the subjective intrapsychic processes of women suffering from breast cancer, which can provide researchers and health care professionals with useful insight. Using Biographic narrative interpretative method, the study reveals some common denominators in the subjective life experiences of women with breast cancer. The study revealed that the subjects consider the diagnosis of breast cancer as one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Benjamin Lamb-Books (2013). Adorno and Horkheimer's Collective Psychology On Psychoanalytic Social Explanations. Thesis Eleven 117 (1):40-54.score: 30.0
    This article demonstrates how Adorno and Horkheimer’s turn to psychoanalytic concepts like sublimation and intra-psychic conflict strengthened critical theory. The piecemeal collective psychology they produced was used to understand fascism and anti-Semitism. But the full significance of these psychoanalytic explanations was concealed by Adorno, who elsewhere denied the possibility of psychology proper after the death of the individual. Adorno and Horkheimer’s underhanded borrowing from psychoanalysis for social analysis had the effect of filtering collective psychology through the lens of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Nicholas Maxwell (2003). Art as Its Own Interpretation. In Andreea Ruvoi (ed.), Interpretation and Its Objects: Studies in the Philosophy of Michael Krausz. Rodopi.score: 27.0
    In this article I argue that a work of art provides the best interpretation of itself - more faithful than any other scholarly interpretative work.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Colin Mcginn (1986). Radical Interpretation and Epistemology. In Truth and Interpretation: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Cambridge: Blackwell.score: 27.0
    In this companion to ‘Charity, Interpretation, and Belief’, McGinn broadens his attack on Davidson's principle of charity, arguing that charity is no more required for the ascription of notional beliefs (i.e. shared concepts) than it is for the ascription of relational beliefs. His argument takes the form of a reductio: if Davidson were right that about the inherently charitable nature of interpretation, then, McGinn argues, traditional sceptical worries (e.g. concerning the external world, other minds) would not even arise. (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000