Search results for 'Psychoanalytic interpretation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  63
    Kevin Lynch (2014). The Vagaries of Psychoanalytic Interpretation: An Investigation Into the Causes of the Consensus Problem in Psychoanalysis. Philosophia 42 (3):779-799.
    Though the psychoanalytic method of interpretation is seen by psychoanalysts as a reliable scientific tool for investigating the unconscious mind, its reputation has long been marred by what’s known as the consensus problem: where different analysts fail to reach agreement when they interpret the same phenomena. This has long been thought, by both practitioners and observers of psychoanalysis, to undermine its claim to scientific status. The causes of this problem, however, are dimly understood. In this paper I attempt (...)
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  2.  11
    Marcus Verhaegh (2001). Hypothetical and Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:295-305.
    I develop the concept of hypothetical interpretation to give an account of certain problematic interpretive practices within a broadly Gricean framework. These practices attempt to find neither speaker nor linguistic meaning but rather, seek to discover such things as the unconscious beliefs of a text’s producer. In developing the concept of hypothetical interpretation, I consider in particular the question of their plausibility. I show how the plausibility of a hypothetical interpretation can be taken as providing evidence about (...)
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  3.  98
    Adrian Stokes (1959). Form in Art: A Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (2):193-203.
  4. Frank Cioffi (2001). The Rationale for Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Psychological Inquiry 12 (3):161-166.
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  5. P. J. Gibbs (1997). A Psychoanalytic Interpretation of the Effectiveness of Humor in Teaching Philosophy. Journal of Thought 32:123-133.
     
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  6.  10
    Tim-Hung Ku (2007). Psychoanalytic Semiotics and the Interpretation of Dream Paintings. American Journal of Semiotics 23 (1/4):303-336.
    The present paper is divided into two parts. Part one is an attempt to reconstruct the semiotic models of Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis, in which conceptsfrom De Saussure, C. S. Peirce, Jakobson, Lotman, Eco are drawn for mutual illumination and synthesis. Psychoanalytic semiotics is considered a particular areaand discipline in semiotics, aiming at the unconscious dimension of the subject. Lacan could be considered a post-structuralist revision and extension of Freud. Part two is an application of psychoanalytic semiotics to the (...) of dream painting, focusing on the Dali example. Essential issues in psychoanalytic semiotics of dream painting are explored in the Dali example, such as dream indexes, dream mechanisms, self-portraits as imago and icon, and psychoanalytic Nirvana as a recovery and memory of a non-alienated subject. My reading of Dali demonstrates the possibility of a convergence of semiotics, psychoanalysis, and art criticism. (shrink)
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  7.  5
    Rachel B. Blass (1994). Is Psychoanalytic Dream Interpretation Possible? Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 2 (1):71-94.
    In this paper I explore the question of whether the dream can be assumed to have any inherent meaning that can become accessible to the awake analyzer of the dream. For this purpose I adopt the basic assumptions underlying the general process of ascription of meaning in psychoanalytic theory and examine whether these assumptions are applicable to dreams. I conclude that because of the possible discontinuity of the self between the wakeful and dreaming states, these assumptions cannot be straightforwardly (...)
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  8.  19
    Simon Clarke (2003). Psychoanalytic Sociology and the Interpretation of Emotion. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (2):145–163.
    In this paper I explore the sociological study of emotion, contrasting constructionist and psychoanalytic accounts of envy as an emotion. I seek not to contra each vis-à-vis the other but to establish some kind of synthesis in a psychoanalytic sociology of emotion. I argue that although the constructionist approach to emotion gives us valuable insights into the social and moral dimensions of human encounters, it is unable to address the level of emotional intensity found for example in murderous (...)
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  9. Waud Kracke & Gilbert Herdt (1987). Introduction: Interpretation in Psychoanalytic Anthropology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 15 (1):3-7.
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  10. Waud Kracke & Gilbert Herdt (1987). Introduction: Interpretation in Psychoanalytic Anthropology. Ethos 15 (1):3-7.
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  11.  7
    Robin Scroggs (1978). The Heuristic Value of a Psychoanalytic Model in the Interpretation of Pauline Theology. Zygon 13 (2):136-157.
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  12.  2
    Eileen Barner (1975). Ideology and Social Knowledge. Harold J. Bershady. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, I973. Pp. I78. £3.25. Psychoanalytic Sociology : An Essay on the Interpretation of Historical and the Phenomena of Collective Behaviour. Fred Weinstein and Gerald M. Platt. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, I973. Pp. XI+I24. $8.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (2):215-221.
  13. J. L. Talmon (1975). Fred Weinstein and Gerald M. Platt, "Psychoanalytic Sociology. An Essay on the Interpretation of Historical Data and the Phenomena of Collective Behavior". [REVIEW] History and Theory 14 (1):121.
     
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  14.  5
    Alan Bass (2006). Interpretation and Difference: The Strangeness of Care. Stanford University Press.
    This book is the companion to Difference and Disavowal: The Trauma of Eros (Stanford University Press, 2000), which dealt with the psychoanalytic clinical problem of resistance to interpretation. The key to this resistance is the unconscious registration and repudiation (disavowal) of the reality of difference. The surprising generality of this resistance intersects with Nietzsche's, Heidegger's, and Derrida's understanding of how and why difference is in general the “unthought of metaphysics.” All three see metaphysics engaged with a “registration and (...)
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  15. David Stanley Caudill (1997). Lacan and the Subject of Law: Toward a Psychoanalytic Critical Legal Theory. Humanities Press.
  16.  41
    Donald Levy (1996). Freud Among the Philosophers: The Psychoanalytic Unconscious and its Philosophical Critics. Yale University Press.
    In this highly original book, Donald Levy considers the most important and persuasive of these philosophical criticisms, as articulated by four figures: Ludwig Wittgenstein, William James, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Adolf Grunbaum.
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  17.  1
    Mark Solms (2000). A Psychoanalytic Contribution to Contemporary Neuroscience. In Max Velmans (ed.), Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness: New Methodologies and Maps. John Benjamins 67-95.
  18.  36
    Jerome Neu (2002). An Ethics of Fantasy? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):133-157.
    Philosophical and popular ethics tend to focus on the question "What ought I to do?" Is there, in addition to the ethics of action, an ethics of fantasy? Are there fantasies one ought not to have? Of course there are fantasies with horrific content. Does it follow that there is something wrong with a person who has such fantasies or that they ought to make efforts to suppress them or to otherwise change themselves? Do the problems such fantasies raise depend (...)
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  19.  45
    Bent Rosenbaum (2003). The Unconscious: How Does It Speak to Us Today? Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review 26 (1):31-40.
  20. Hugo Bleichmar (2004). Making Conscious the Unconscious in Order to Modify Unconscious Processing: Some Mechanisms of Therapeutic Change. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 85 (6):1379-1400.
  21.  5
    Linda Roland Danil (2015). A Lacanian-Zizekian Psychoanalytic Reading of Haruki Murakami’s The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. International Journal of Žižek Studies 9.
    This article will argue that Haruki Murakami’s novel The Wind-up Bird Chronicle could be deeply enriched by a Lacanian psychoanalytic interpretation, specifically with Lacanian psychoanalysis as interpreted by Slavoj Zizek, and thus draw forth more complex and nuanced understandings of the constitution and nature of subjectivity and identity, and the link between the individual and the social. In addition, and in contradistinction to other works that have utilized Lacanian psychoanalytic principles to analyze the book, this article will (...)
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  22.  38
    Edgar Levenson (2001). The Enigma of the Unconscious. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (2):239-252.
  23.  31
    Kate Ince (2011). Bringing Bodies Back In: For a Phenomenological and Psychoanalytic Film Criticism of Embodied Cultural Identity. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):1-12.
    This article reassesses the concept of identification in line with the increased importance phenomenology has taken on in film-philosophy of the 1990s and 2000s. In the 1970s and 1980s, a Lacanian psychoanalytic interpretation of identification dominated film theory and criticism, and spectatorial engagement with elements of films was understood as what psychoanalysis calls secondary identification – the identification with stable subject-positions (characters) in the film-text. But non-Lacanian psychoanalysis and Merleau-Ponty’s existential phenomenology offer film-philosophy a very different understanding of (...)
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  24. Mick Power (2000). Freud and the Unconscious. The Psychologist. Special Issue 13 (12):612-614.
  25.  32
    Karin Mogg, Lusia Stopa & Brendan P. Bradley (2001). From the Conscious Into the Unconscious: What Can Cognitive Theories of Psychopathology Learn From Freudian Theory? Psychological Inquiry 12 (3):139-143.
  26.  3
    Jane Gallop (1987). Reading the Mother Tongue: Psychoanalytic Feminist Criticism. Critical Inquiry 13 (2):314-329.
    In the early seventies, American feminist literary criticism had little patience for psychoanalytic interpretation, dismissing it along with other forms of what Mary Ellmann called “phallic criticism.”1 Not that psychoanalytic literary criticism was a specific target of feminist critics, but Freud and his science were viewed by feminism in general as prime perpetrators of patriarchy. If we take Kate Millett’s Sexual Politics2 as the first book of modern feminist criticism, let us remark that she devotes ample space (...)
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  27.  10
    Gladys B. Guarton (2001). Unconscious Learning and Conscious Choice: Commentary on Levenson's Essay. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 37 (2):253-263.
  28. David Rosenfeld (1988). Psychoanalysis and Groups: History and Dialectics. Karnac Books.
  29. Ranyard West (1974). International Law and Psychology. Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.,Oceana Publications.
     
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  30. Ranyard West (1974). International Law and Psychology Two Studies: The Intrusion of Order [and] Conscience and Society. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31. Jim Hopkins (1995). Wittgenstein, Interpretation, and the Foundations of Psychoanalysis. New Formations.
    In his work on following a rule Wittgenstein discerned principles of interpretation that apply to commonsense psychology and psychoanalysis. We can use these to assess the cogency of psychoanalytic reasoning.
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  32.  23
    William Barclay Parsons (1999). The Enigma of the Oceanic Feeling: Revisioning the Psychoanalytic Theory of Mysticism. Oxford University Press.
    This study examines the history of the psychoanalytic theory of mysticism, starting with the seminal correspondence between Freud and Romain Rolland concerning the concept of "oceanic feeling." Providing a corrective to current views which frame psychoanalysis as pathologizing mysticism, Parsons reveals the existence of three models entertained by Freud and Rolland: the classical reductive, ego-adaptive, and transformational (which allows for a transcendent dimension to mysticism). Then, reconstructing Rolland's personal mysticism (the "oceanic feeling") through texts and letters unavailable to Freud, (...)
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  33.  4
    Siamak Movahedi (2012). Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Reported Dreams and the Problem of Double Hermeneutics in Clinical Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M12.
    The aim of this article is to show that statistical analysis and hermeneutics are not mutually exclusive. Although statistical analysis may capture some patterns and regularities, statistical methods may themselves generate different types of interpretation and, in turn, give rise to even more interpretations. The discussion is lodged within the context of a quantitative analysis of dream content. I attempted to examine the dialogical texts of reported dreams monologically, but soon found myself returning to dialogic contexts to make sense (...)
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  34.  1
    Arthur F. Marotti (1978). Countertransference, the Communication Process, and the Dimensions of Psychoanalytic Criticism. Critical Inquiry 4 (3):471-489.
    To stress the subjectivity of the analyst is to accept the centrality of countertransference in the analytic relationship. Psychoanalysts have long recognized the importance of transference in the analytic setting—that is, the analysand's way of relating to the analyst in terms of his strong, ambivalent unconscious feelings for earlier figures , a process whose successful resolution constitutes the psychoanalystic "cure." But, since the patient's transference is only experienced by the analyst through his countertransference responses, recent theorists have come to emphasize (...)
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  35.  1
    Heinz Kohut (1978). Psychoanalysis and the Interpretation of Literature: A Correspondence with Erich Heller. Critical Inquiry 4 (3):433-450.
    Dear Professor Heller . . . Your paper had started out superbly. It was a great aesthetic and cognitive pleasure to follow you as you guided us through the intellectual history of the main idea of Kleist's essay, from Plato through the biblical Fall of Man, to Schiller, and Kierkegaard, and Kafka. Indeed the perceptive listener's experience was so satisfying that his disappointment was doubled when he came to realize that all this erudition and beauty had been displayed only in (...)
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  36. Jorge L. Ahumada (2011). Insight: Essays on Psychoanalytic Knowing. Routledge.
    This book explores the clinical processes of psychoanalysis by charting modern developments in logic and applying them to the study of insight. Offering an epistemic approach to clinical psychoanalysis this book places value on the clinical interpretations of both the analysand and analyst and engages in a critique on purely linguistic approaches to psychoanalysis, which forsake crucial dimensions of clinical practice. Drawing on the work of key twentieth century thinkers including Jerome Richfield, Ignacio Matte-Blanco, Gregory Bateson and the pioneering contribution (...)
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  37. William B. Parsons (1997). The Enigma of the Oceanic Feeling: Revisioning the Psychoanalytic Theory of Mysticism. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This study examines the history of the psychoanalytic theory of mysticism, starting with the seminal correspondence between Freud and Romain Rolland concerning the concept of "oceanic feeling." Providing a corrective to current views which frame psychoanalysis as pathologizing mysticism, Parsons reveals the existence of three models entertained by Freud and Rolland: the classical reductive, ego-adaptive, and transformational. Then, reconstructing Rolland's personal mysticism through texts and letters unavailable to Freud, Parsons argues that Freud misinterpreted the oceanic feeling. In offering a (...)
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  38. David P. Levine (2015). Psychoanalytic Studies of Creativity, Greed, and Fine Art: Making Contact with the Self. Routledge.
    Throughout the history of psychoanalysis, the study of creativity and fine art has been a special concern. _Psychoanalytic Studies of Creativity, Greed and Fine Art: Making Contact with the Self_ makes a distinct contribution to the psychoanalytic study of art by focusing attention on the relationship between creativity and greed. This book also focuses attention on factors in the personality that block creativity, and examines the matter of the self and its ability to be present and exist as the (...)
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  39. Molly Macdonald (2013). Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit". Routledge.
    Both Hegel's philosophy and psychoanalytic theory have profoundly influenced contemporary thought, but they are traditionally seen to work in separate rather than intersecting universes. This book offers a new interpretation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and brings it into conversation the work of two of the best-known contemporary psychoanalysts, Christopher Bollas and André Green. Hegel and Psychoanalysis centers a consideration of the Phenomenology on the figure of the Unhappy Consciousness and the concept of Force, two areas that are (...)
     
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  40. Molly Macdonald (2013). Hegel and Psychoanalysis: A New Interpretation of "Phenomenology of Spirit". Routledge.
    Both Hegel's philosophy and psychoanalytic theory have profoundly influenced contemporary thought, but they are traditionally seen to work in separate rather than intersecting universes. This book offers a new interpretation of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and brings it into conversation the work of two of the best-known contemporary psychoanalysts, Christopher Bollas and André Green. Hegel and Psychoanalysis centers a consideration of the Phenomenology on the figure of the Unhappy Consciousness and the concept of Force, two areas that are (...)
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  41. Joseph Masling (ed.) (2016). Empirical Studies of Psychoanalytic Theories, V. 3. Routledge.
    Few theories have influenced Western thought as much as psychoanalysis has, even in the absence of empirically confirmatory evidence. The raw data of psychoanalysis are the words and actions of the patient and their interpretation by the analyst. The psychoanalytic session has excluded other observers and, until very recently, even a tape recorder. The only evidence of what transpired between patient and therapist was supplied by the memories, accounts, and records each of them might have kept. The degree (...)
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  42. Jerome D. Oremland & Merton M. Gill (eds.) (1991). Interpretation and Interaction: Psychoanalysis or Psychotherapy? Routledge.
    In recent decades the relationship between psychoanalysis and psychotherapy has been a focal point for debate about the distinctiveness of analysis as a particular kind of therapeutic enterprise. In _Interpretation and Interaction_, Jerome Oremland invokes the interventions of "interpretation" and "interaction," rooted in the values of understanding and amelioration, respectively, as a conceptual basis for reappraising these important issues. In place of the commonly accepted triadic division among psychoanalysis, exploratory psychotherapy, and supportive psychotherapy, he proposes a new triad: psychoanalysis, (...)
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  43. Jerome D. Oremland & Merton M. Gill (eds.) (2016). Interpretation and Interaction: Psychoanalysis or Psychotherapy? Routledge.
    In recent decades the relationship between psychoanalysis and psychotherapy has been a focal point for debate about the distinctiveness of analysis as a particular kind of therapeutic enterprise. In _Interpretation and Interaction_, Jerome Oremland invokes the interventions of "interpretation" and "interaction," rooted in the values of understanding and amelioration, respectively, as a conceptual basis for reappraising these important issues. In place of the commonly accepted triadic division among psychoanalysis, exploratory psychotherapy, and supportive psychotherapy, he proposes a new triad: psychoanalysis, (...)
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  44. Moustafa Safouan (2002). Speech or Death?: Language as Social Order: A Psychoanalytic Study. Palgrave.
    How is social agreement ever reached, given that the notion of intersubjectivity cannot offer an adequate account? A problem for psychoanalytic theory is that of the sovereign third person who apparently holds the balance. Using the question of ambiguity in language and interpretation in psychoanalysis, this book explores the alliance of religion and the social as they support the sacred.
     
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  45. Margret Schaefer (1978). Psychoanalysis and the Marionette Theater: Interpretation Is Not Depreciation. Critical Inquiry 5 (1):177-188.
    At the end of his attack on my use of the psychoanalytic model for the interpretation of literature, Heller raises the question concerning what the task of the literary critic is or ought to be. His own "sketch of the Kleistean theme's historical ancestry and its later development," he says, seeks to deepen and enrich the reader's appreciation of Kleist's literary art, the artistry of his phrasing, the persuasiveness of his incidents, the conclusiveness of his examples." By implication (...)
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  46.  16
    Michael W. Barclay (2000). The Inadvertent Emergence of a Phenomenological Perspective in the Philosophy of Cognitive Psychology and Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):140-166.
    The phenomenological perspective described by M. Merleau-Ponty seems to be emerging in the context of contemporary developmental research, theories of communication, metaphor theory, and cognitive neuroscience. This emergence is not always accompanied by reference to Merleau-Ponty, however, or appropriate interpretation. On some cases, the emergence of the perspective seems rather inadvertent. The purpose of this essay is to ferret out some of the points which contemporary thinking has in common with Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology. Though it may appear that the examples (...)
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  47.  16
    Paul A. Roth (1991). Truth in Interpretation: The Case of Psychoanalysis. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):175-195.
    This article explores and attempts to resolve some issues that arise when psychoanalytic explanations are construed as a type of historical or narrative explanation. The chief problem is this: If one rejects the claim of narratives to verisimilitude, this appears to divorce the notion of explanation from that of truth. The author examines, in particular, Donald Spence's attempt to deal with the relation of narrative explanations and truth. In his critique of Spence's distinction between narrative truth and historical truth, (...)
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  48.  10
    Brian Garvey (2003). Darwinian Functions and Freudian Motivations. Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):427-444.
    Badcock, and Nesse and Lloyd, have argued that there are important points of agreement between Freud's theory of the mind and a theory of mind suggested by adaptive reasoning. Buller, on the other hand, draws attention to the need to avoid confusing an adaptive rationale with an unconscious motivation. The present paper attempts to indicate what role adaptive reasoning might have to play in justifying psychoanalytic claims. First, it is argued that psychoanalytic claims cannot be justified by the (...)
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  49.  2
    Linda Lundgaard Andersen (2012). Interaction, Transference, and Subjectivity: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M3.
    Fieldwork is one of the important methods in educational, social, and organisational research. In fieldwork, the researcher takes residence for a shorter or longer period amongst the subjects and settings to be studied. The aim of this is to study the culture of people: how people seem to make sense of their lives and which moral, professional, and ethical values seem to guide their behaviour and attitudes. In fieldwork, the researcher has to balance participation and observation in her attempts at (...)
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  50.  4
    Grigoris Vaslamatzis (2007). Framework for a New Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and Neurosciences: Is the Combined Neuro-Psychoanalytic Approach the Missing Link? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):25-.
    Freud's legacy deriving from his work The project for a scientific psychology (1895) could give a new impetus to the dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences. A rapproachment phase is warrented. Based on the work of psychoanalysts who are themselves neuroscientists (such as Mauro Mancia, Martha Koukkou and Harold Shevrin) or have a long term dialogue with neuroscientists (Arnold Modell), three points of epistemological congruence are described: dualism is no longer a satisfactory solutioncautions for the centrality of interpretation (hermeneutics)the self-criticism (...)
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