Search results for 'Psychology History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Sidney Brett (1912/1998). A History of Psychology. Thoemmes Press.score: 78.0
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations (...)
     
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  2. Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.score: 75.0
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained (...)
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  3. George Sidney Brett (1965). Brett's History of Psychology. Cambridge, Mass.,M.I.T. Press.score: 66.0
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  4. George Sidney Brett (1953). History of Psychology. New York, Macmillan.score: 66.0
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  5. Mary Henle (1986). 1879 and All That: Essays in the Theory and History of Psychology. Columbia University Press.score: 66.0
  6. Harry Albert Van Belle (2014). Explorations in the History of Psychology: Persisting Themata and Changing Paradigms. Dordt College Press.score: 66.0
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  7. Gary Hatfield (2002). Psychology, Philosophy, and Cognitive Science: Reflections on the History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology. Mind and Language 17 (3):207-232.score: 63.0
    This article critically examines the views that psychology ?rst came into existence as a discipline ca. 1879, that philosophy and psychology were estranged in the ensuing decades, that psychology ?nally became scienti?c through the in?uence of logical empiricism, and that it should now disappear in favor of cognitive science and neuroscience. It argues that psychology had a natural philosophical phase (from antiquity) that waxed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, that this psychology transformed into experimental (...)
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  8. Amedeo Giorgi (2010). Phenomenological Psychology: A Brief History and Its Challenges. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (2):145-179.score: 63.0
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  9. Jacob A. Belzen (2013). Ein Ende, Das Zum Anfang Wurde: Die Zeitschrift für Religionspsychologie, 1907-1913. Zur (Vor)Geschichte der IAPRThe End That Turned Into a New Beginning: The Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 1907-1913. On the (Pre)History of the International Association for the Psychology of Religion. [REVIEW] Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (3):285-319.score: 63.0
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  10. Martin Kusch (1999). Psychological Knowledge: A Social History and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 60.0
    An introduction to the workings of constructivism, Psychological Knowledge is an insightful introduction to the history of psychology and the recent philosophy of mind.
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  11. María G. Navarro (2013). Review of A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability': The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe by C. F. Goodey. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 71 (1 & 2).score: 54.0
    A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability” examines how the concepts of intellectual ability and disability became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Focusing on the period between the Protestant Reform and 1700, this book shows that in many cases it has been accepted without scientific and psychological foundations that intelligence and disability describe natural or trans-historical realities.
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  12. Dedre Gentner (2010). Psychology in Cognitive Science: 1978–2038. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):328-344.score: 51.0
    This paper considers the past and future of Psychology within Cognitive Science. In the history section, I focus on three questions: (a) how has the position of Psychology evolved within Cognitive Science, relative to the other disciplines that make up Cognitive Science; (b) how have particular Cognitive Science areas within Psychology waxed or waned; and (c) what have we gained and lost. After discussing what’s happened since the late 1970s, when the Society and the journal began, (...)
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  13. Thomas Teo (2005). The Critique of Psychology: From Kant to Postcolonial Theory. Springer.score: 51.0
    Closely paralleling the history of psychology is the history of its critics, their theories, and their contributions. The Critique of Psychology is the first book to trace this alternate history, from a unique perspective that complements the many existing empirical, theoretical, and social histories of the field. Thomas Teo cogently synthesizes major historical and theoretical narratives to describe two centuries of challenges to—and the reactions of—the mainstream. Some of these critiques of content, methodology, relevance, and (...)
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  14. William F. Brewer & Clark A. Chinn (1994). Scientists' Responses to Anomalous Data: Evidence From Psychology, History, and Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:304 - 313.score: 51.0
    This paper presents an analysis of the forms of response that scientists make when confronted with anomalous data. We postulate that there are seven ways in which an individual who currently holds a theory can respond to anomalous data: (1) ignore the data; (2) reject the data; (3) exclude the data from the domain of the current theory; (4) hold the data in abeyance; (5) reinterpret the data; (6) make peripheral changes to the current theory; or (7) change the theory. (...)
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  15. Miki Takasuna (2012). The Fukurai Affair Parapsychology and the History of Psychology in Japan. History of the Human Sciences 25 (2):149-164.score: 51.0
    The history of psychology in Japan from the late 19th century until the first half of the 20th century did not follow a smooth course. After the first psychological laboratory was established at Tokyo Imperial University in 1903, psychology in Japan developed as individual specialties until the Japanese Psychological Association was established in 1927. During that time, Tomokichi Fukurai, an associate professor at Tokyo Imperial University, became involved with psychical research until he was forced out in 1913. (...)
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  16. Paul E. Griffiths, Evolutionary Psychology: History and Current Status.score: 48.0
    The development of evolutionary approaches to psychology from Classical Ethology through Sociobiology to Evolutionary Psychology is outlined and the main tenets of today's Evolutionary Psychology briefly examined: the heuristic value of evolutionary thinking for psychology, the massive modularity thesis and the monomorphic mind thesis.
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  17. Sahotra Sarkar & Paul E. Griffiths, Evolutionary Psychology: History and Current Status.score: 48.0
    The evolutionary study of the mind in the twentieth century has been marked by three self-conscious movements: classical ethology, sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology (capitalized to indicate that it functions here as a proper name). Classical ethology was established in the years immediately before the Second World War, primarily by Konrad Lorenz and Niko Tinbergen (Burckhardt, 1983). Interrupted by the war, the movement blossomed in the early 1950s, when ethologists established major research institutes in most developed countries and developed a (...)
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  18. Richard F. Kitchener (1985). Genetic Epistemology, History of Science and Genetic Psychology. Synthese 65 (1):3 - 31.score: 48.0
    Genetic epistemology analyzes the growth of knowledge both in the individual person (genetic psychology) and in the socio-historical realm (the history of science). But what the relationship is between the history of science and genetic psychology remains unclear. The biogenetic law that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny is inadequate as a characterization of the relation. A critical examination of Piaget's Introduction à l'Épistémologie Généntique indicates these are several examples of what I call stage laws common to both areas. (...)
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  19. Victor Nell (2006). Cruelty and the Psychology of History. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):246-251.score: 48.0
    This response deals with seven of the major challenges the commentators have raised to the target article. First, I show that the historical-anecdotal method I have followed has its roots in sociology, and that there is a strong case for the development of a “psychology of history.” Next, the observational data suggesting that intentional cruelty cannot be restricted to humans is rebutted on the grounds that cruelty requires not only an intention to inflict pain, but to do so (...)
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  20. A. Linley (2009). Positive Psychology (History). In Shane J. Lopez (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology. Wiley-Blackwell. 1--742.score: 48.0
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  21. Steven D. Brown (2009). Psychology Without Foundations: History, Philosophy and Psychosocial Theory. Sage.score: 45.0
    This new book proposes a way out of the crisis by letting go of the idea that psychology needs ‘new’ foundations or a new identity, whether biological, discursive, or cognitive. The psychological is not narrowly confined to any one aspect of human experience; it is quite literally ‘everywhere’. Drawing on a range of influential thinkers including Michel Serres, Michel Foucault, AN Whitehead, and Gilles Deleuze, the book proposes a strong process-oriented approach to the psychological, which studies ‘events’ or ‘occasions.’.
     
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  22. G. Cavallo (1986). Popular Psychology, History and Idea in Lazarus and Steinthal. Filosofia 37 (3):205-221.score: 45.0
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  23. Stephen Everson (ed.) (1991). Psychology. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    This second Companion deals with the ancient theories of the psyche. The essays range over more than eight hundred years of psychological inquiry and provide critical analyses not only of the ancient discussions of the nature of the psyche and its states, but of such central topics as perception, subjectivity, the explanation of action, and what it is to be a person. In examining the wide variety of psychological theories offered by the ancient thinkers, from the increasingly complex materialism of (...)
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  24. Philip Cushman (2002). How Psychology Erodes Personhood. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):103-113.score: 42.0
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  25. C. F. Goodey (2001). From Natural Disability to the Moral Man: Calvinism and the History of Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 14 (3):1-29.score: 42.0
    Some humanist theologians within the French Reformed Church in the 17th century developed the notion that a disability of the intellect could exist in nature independently of any moral defect, freeing its possessors from any obligations of natural law. Sharpened by disputes with the church leadership, this notion began to suggest a species-type classification that threatened to override the importance of the boundary between elect and reprobate in the doctrine of predestination. This classification seems to look forward to the natural (...)
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  26. Robert C. Fuller (1986). Americans and the Unconscious. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Beginning with Emerson and the Transcendentalists, Americans have tended to view the unconscious as the psychological faculty through which individuals might come to experience a higher spiritual realm. On the whole, American psychologists see the unconscious as a symbol of harmony, restoration and revitalization, imbuing it with the capacity to restore peace between the individual and an immanent spiritual power. Americans and the Unconscious studies the symbolic dimensions of American psychology, tracing the historical development of the concept of the (...)
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  27. Mitchell G. Ash & Thomas Sturm (eds.) (2007). Psychology’s Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines. Erlbaum.score: 42.0
    This is an interdisciplinary collection of new essays by philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists and historians on the question: What has determined and what should determine the territory or the boundaries of the discipline named "psychology"? Both the contents - in terms of concepts - and the methods - in terms of instruments - are analyzed. Among the contributors are Mitchell Ash, Paul Baltes, Jochen Brandtstädter, Gerd Gigerenzer, Michael Heidelberger, Gerhard Roth, and Thomas Sturm.
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  28. Mark A. Schroll & Stephan A. Schwartz (2005). Whither Psi and Anthropology? An Incomplete History of SAC's Origins, Its Relationship with Transpersonal Psychology and the Untold Stories of Castaneda's Controversy. Anthropology of Consciousness 16 (1):6-24.score: 42.0
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  29. David Bidney (ed.) (1940). The Psychology and Ethics of Spinoza; a Study in the History and Logic of Ideas. Yale University Press.score: 42.0
     
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  30. Brian M. Hughes (2011). Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology. Pearson.score: 42.0
    Explaining people : theoretical psychology throughout the ages -- Ways of knowing : the scientific method and its alternatives -- From philosophy to laboratory : the arrival of empirical psychology -- The evolution of measurement : from physiognomy to psychometrics -- The behaviourist revolution : actions as data -- The cognitive revolution : the metaphor of computation -- Neuroscience and genetics : 21st century reductionism? -- Can psychology be scientific? -- Subjectivist approaches to psychology -- The (...)
     
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  31. Brian M. Hughes (2011). Psychology Express: Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology. Pearson.score: 42.0
    Explaining people : theoretical psychology throughout the ages -- Ways of knowing : the scientific method and its alternatives -- From philosophy to laboratory : the arrival of empirical psychology -- The evolution of measurement : from physiognomy to psychometrics -- The behaviourist revolution : actions as data -- The cognitive revolution : the metaphor of computation -- Neuroscience and genetics : 21st century reductionism? -- Can psychology be scientific? -- Subjectivist approaches to psychology -- The (...)
     
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  32. Blakey Vermeule (2000). The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 42.0
    What is the relationship between the self and society? Where do moral judgments come from? As Blakey Vermeule demonstrates in The Party of Humanity, such questions about sociability and moral philosophy were central to eighteenth-century writers and artists. Vermeule focuses on a group of aesthetically complicated moral texts: Alexander Pope's character sketches and Dunciad , Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage, and David Hume's self-consciously theatrical writings on pride and his autobiographical writings on religious melancholia. These writers and their characters confronted (...)
     
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  33. Thomas Sturm & Mitchell G. Ash (eds.) (2007). Psychology's Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines. Erlbaum.score: 40.0
    Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines Mitchell Ash, Thomas Sturm. Psychological Thought and Practice: Historical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives Mitchell G. Ash University of Vienna ...
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  34. Wolfgang Huemer & Christoph Landerer (2010). Mathematics, Experience, and Laboratories: Herbart's and Brentano's Role in the Rise of Scientific Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):72-94.score: 39.0
    In this article we present and compare two early attempts to establish psychology as an independent scientific discipline that had considerable influence in central Europe: the theories of Johann Friedrich Herbart (1776—1841) and Franz Brentano (1838—1917). While both of them emphasize that psychology ought to be conceived as an empirical science, their conceptions show revealing differences. Herbart starts with metaphysical principles and aims at mathematizing psychology, whereas Brentano rejects all metaphysics and bases his method on a conception (...)
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  35. Roy Porter (ed.) (1997). Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.score: 39.0
    Rewriting the Self is an exploration of ideas of the self in the western cultural tradition from the Renaissance to the present. The contributors analyze different religious, philosophical, psychological, political, psychoanalytical and literary models of personal identity from a number of viewpoints, including the history of ideas, contemporary gender politics, and post-modernist literary theory. Challenging the received version of the "ascent of western man," they assess the discursive construction of the self in the light of political, technological and social (...)
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  36. Thomas Sturm (2009). Kant Und Die Wissenschaften Vom Menschen. Mentis.score: 39.0
    This book explores Kant's philosophy of the human sciences, their status, their relations and prospects. Contrary to widespread belief, he is not dogmatic about the question of whether these disciplines are proper sciences. Instead, this depends on whether we can rationally adjust assumptions about the methods, goals, and subject matter of these disciplines - and this has to be done alongside of ongoing research. Kant applies these ideas especially in lectures on "pragmatic antropology" given from 1772-1796. In doing so, he (...)
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  37. Christopher D. Green, Classics in the History of Psychology.score: 39.0
    Psychology as the behaviorist views it is a purely objective experimental branch of natural science. Its theoretical goal is the prediction and control of behavior. Introspection forms no essential part of its methods, nor is the scientific value of its data dependent upon the readiness with which they lend themselves to interpretation in terms of consciousness. The behaviorist, in his efforts to get a unitary scheme of animal response, recognizes no dividing line between man and brute. The behavior of (...)
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  38. Rod Buchanan (2008). Book Review: Adrian C. Brock, Ed., Internationalizing the History of Psychology. New York: New York University Press, 2006. 0-8147-9944-2. $50.00 (Cloth), Viii + 260 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 21 (2):120-123.score: 39.0
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  39. Janet Thormann (2002). The Representation of the Shoah in Maus: History as Psychology. Res Publica 8 (2):123-139.score: 39.0
    The contemporary tendency in United States culture to substitute a discourse of psychology for political and social analysis is especially evident in treatments of the Shoah. Drawing on postmodernist techniques, Art Spiegelman's“Holocaust commix”, Maus, dramatizes not historical reality but the effort of representing the memory of trauma. In the absence of symbolic authority, suffering from rivalry with his father and haunted by the real of the father's voice, the son becomes the subject of the narration. Like Maus, the Holocaust (...)
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  40. John Macnamara (1999). Through the Rearview Mirror: Historical Reflections on Psychology. Mit Press.score: 39.0
    In this lively book, John Macnamara shows how a number of important thinkers through the ages have approached problems of mental representation and the ...
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  41. Teed Rockwell, The Effects of Atomistic Ontology on the History of Psychology.score: 39.0
    _This article articulates the presuppositions that psychology inherited from logical positivism, and how_ _those presuppositions effected the interpretation of data and research procedures. Despite the efforts of_ _Wundt, his most well known disciples, Titchener and Külpe, embraced an atomistic view of experience which_ _was at_ _least partly responsible for many of their failures. When the behaviorists rejected the_ _introspectionism of Titchener and Külpe, they kept their atomism, using the reflex_.
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  42. H. A. (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33c/2 (2002), 235-261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-201.score: 39.0
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  43. George Boas (1920). A Note for the History of Affective Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (6):157-159.score: 39.0
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  44. D. A. H. Wilson (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33C/2 (2002), 235–261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-.score: 39.0
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  45. J. Bos (2009). The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.score: 39.0
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together (...)
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  46. Mike Michael (1997). The Hiss of History and the Sigh of Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):133-139.score: 39.0
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  47. Mark Bauerlein (1997). The Pragmatic Mind: Explorations in the Psychology of Belief. Duke University Press.score: 39.0
    The Pragmatic Mind is a study of the pragmatism of Emerson, James, and Peirce and its overlooked relevance for the neopragmatism of thinkers like Richard Rorty, ...
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  48. Jadunath Sinha (1958). Indian Psychology. Calcutta, Sinha Pub. House.score: 39.0
    The Gross Body The Katlia Upanisad declares: "The self conjoined with the sense- organs and mind (manas) is the experiencer ...
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  49. Charles A. Ellwood (1919). Comment on Dr. Goldenweiser's "History, Psychology, and Culture". Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (3):75-77.score: 39.0
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  50. A. A. Goldenweiser (1918). History, Psychology and Culture: A Set of Categories for an Introduction to Social Science. Part I. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (21):561-571.score: 39.0
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