Search results for 'Psychology, Military' (try it on Scholar)

51 found
Sort by:
  1. Nancy Sherman (2005). Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    While few soldiers may have read the works of Epictetus or Marcus Aurelius, it is undoubtedly true that the ancient philosophy known as Stoicism guides the actions of many in the military. Soldiers and seamen learn early in their training "to suck it up," to endure, to put aside their feelings and to get on with the mission. Stoic Warriors is the first book to delve deeply into the ancient legacy of this relationship, exploring what the Stoic philosophy actually (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jessica Wolfendale & Paolo Tripodi (eds.) (2011/2012). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.score: 39.0
  3. Don Parker & Peter Greener (2008). Ethics Research: Moral Psychology and its Promise of Benefits for Moral Reasoning in the Military. In C. A. J. Coady & Igor Primoratz (eds.), Military Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Co.. 25.score: 39.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Paolo Tripodi & Jessica Wolfendale (eds.) (2011/2012). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.score: 39.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Hans Pols (2008). Book Review: Edgar Jones and Simon Wessely, Shell Shock to PTSD: Military Psychiatry From 1900 to the Gulf War. London: Psychology Press, 2005. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 21 (2):124-128.score: 36.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Rudolf Allers (1944). Military Psychology. Thought 19 (2):366-366.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey L. House (1980). Military Psychology and Moral Dilemmas: The Military Response. Hastings Center Report 10 (4):25-26.score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. G. P. Krueger (2001). Military Psychology: United States. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 9868--9873.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Perry London (1979). The Moral Dilemma of Military Psychology. Hastings Center Report 9 (6):42-44.score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jessica Wolfendale (2006). Stoic Warriors and Stoic Torturers: The Moral Psychology of Military Torture. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):62-76.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. A. L. Zhuravlev, V. A. Kolʹt͡sova & T. I. Artemʹeva (eds.) (2007). K. Izd-Vo "Institut Psikhologii Ran".score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. A. L. Zhuravlev, V. A. Kolʹt͡sova & T. I. Artemʹeva (eds.) (2007). K.K. Platonov--Vydai͡ushchiĭsi͡a Otechestvennyĭ Psikholog Xx Veka: Materialy I͡ubileĭnoĭ Nauchnoĭ Konferent͡sii, Posvi͡ashchennoĭ 100-Letii͡u so Dni͡a Rozhdenii͡a K.K. Platonova (22 Ii͡uni͡a 2006 G.). [REVIEW] Izd-Vo "Institut Psikhologii Ran".score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Nancy E. Snow (2009). How Ethical Theory Can Improve Practice: Lessons From Abu Ghraib. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):555 - 568.score: 25.0
    Abuses at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq confront us with the question of how seemingly ordinary soldiers could have perpetrated harms against prisoners. In this essay I argue that a Stoic approach to the virtues can provide a bulwark against the social and personal forces that can lead to abusive behavior. In part one, I discuss Abu Ghraib. In two, I examine social psychological explanations of how ordinary, apparently decent people are able to commit atrocities. In three, I address a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. George R. Mastroianni (2011). The Person–Situation Debate: Implications for Military Leadership and Civilian–Military Relations. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (1):2-16.score: 24.0
    The so-called person?situation debate in psychology, which pits internal, personality-based explanations of behavior against external, environment or situation-based explanations seems headed for a resolution that will somehow include elements of both perspectives. These two alternative views of human behavior have also been applied to that subset of human behavior thought of as leadership, and in this domain a rapprochement also seems well underway. In the domain of ethical leadership, however, especially as applied to military misconduct, public discussion of such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. James A. Stephenson & Mark A. Staal (2007). An Ethical Decision-Making Model for Operational Psychology. Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):61 – 82.score: 21.0
    Operational psychology is an emerging subdiscipline that has enhanced the U.S. military's combat capabilities during the Global War on Terrorism. What makes this subdiscipline unique is its use of psychological principles and skills to improve a commander's decision making as it pertains to conducting combat (or related operations). Due to psychology's expanding role in combat support, psychologists are being confronted with challenges that require the application of their professional ethics in areas in which little if any guidance has been (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jean Maria Arrigo (2004). A Utilitarian Argument Against Torture Interrogation of Terrorists. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):543-572.score: 18.0
    Following the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, much support for torture interrogation of terrorists has emerged in the public forum, largely based on the “ticking bomb” scenario. Although deontological and virtue ethics provide incisive arguments against torture, they do not speak directly to scientists and government officials responsible for national security in a utilitarian framework. Drawing from criminology, organizational theory, social psychology, the historical record, and my interviews with military professionals, I assess the potential of an (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. R. L. Bates (1922). A Study in Grades and Grading Under a Military System. Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (5):329.score: 18.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Lauren Eskreis-Winkler, Angela Lee Duckworth, Elizabeth P. Shulman & Scott Beal (forthcoming). The Grit Effect: Predicting Retention in the Military, the Workplace, School and Marriage. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 15.0
    Remaining committed to goals is necessary (albeit not sufficient) to attaining them, but very little is known about domain-general individual differences that contribute to sustained goal commitment. The current investigation examines the association between grit, defined as passion and perseverance for long-term goals, and retention in four different contexts: the military, workplace sales, high school, and marriage. Grit demonstrated incremental predictive validity over and beyond demographic variables and established predictors of retention in each setting. Grittier soldiers were more likely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Loryana L. Vie, Kevin N. Griffith, Lawrence M. Scheier, Paul B. Lester & Martin E. P. Seligman (2013). The Person-Event Data Environment (PDE): Leveraging Big Data for Studies of Psychological Strengths in Soldiers. Frontiers in Psychology 4:934.score: 14.0
    The Department of Defense (DoD) strives to efficiently manage the large volumes of administrative data collected and repurpose this information for research and analyses with policy implications. This need is especially present in the United States Army, which maintains numerous electronic databases with information on more than one million Active-Duty, Reserve, and National Guard soldiers, their family members, and Army civilian employees. The accumulation of vast amounts of digitized health, military service, and demographic data thus approaches, and may even (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael Apter (2008). Reversal Theory, Victor Turner and the Experience of Ritual. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):184-203.score: 12.0
    The extraordinary parallel between the psychological theory of reversals (Apter, 1982) and the anthropological theory of anti-structure (Turner, 1982)-- both derived independently and almost simultaneously from entirely different kinds of evidence and research-- would seem to point to something profound and universal in human experience which has been curiously neglected in the behavioural sciences and entirely ignored in consciousness studies. What I will do here is to introduce reversal theory, show how it applies to ritual, and then compare it with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Craig Summers (1992). Militarism, Human Welfare, and the Apa Ethical Principles of Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior 2 (4):287 – 310.score: 12.0
    A case study is presented of the American Psychological Association (APA), as a health care organization that promotes human welfare. APA includes policies on human welfare in its Ethical Principles of Psychologists and even lists the advancement of psychology "as a means of promoting human welfare" on its letterhead. Nevertheless, APA has other policies and activities based on military and weapons work that appear to conflict with its promotion of human welfare. Although military work in and of itself (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Daniel K. Lapsley & F. Clark Power (2006). Character Psychology and Character Education. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (1):77-78.score: 12.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Helen Hodges, Stevan Harnad, Barbara L. Finlay & Paul Bloom (2004). In Memoriam: Jeffrey Gray (1934–2004). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):1-2.score: 12.0
    Many strands are woven into the ideas and work of Jeffrey Gray. From a background of classical languages and a spell in military intelligence spent honing skills in languages and typing, he took two BA degrees (in modern languages and psychology) at Oxford University. He then trained as a clinical psychologist at the Institute of Psychiatry (IOP), London, capping this with a PhD on the sources of emotional behaviour.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Farrell & James P. Sterba (2008). Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?: A Debate. OUP USA.score: 12.0
    Does feminism give a much-needed voice to women in a patriarchal world? Or is the world not really patriarchal? Has feminism begun to level the playing field in a world in which women are more often paid less at work and abused at home? Or are women paid equally for the same work and not abused more at home? Does feminism support equality in education and in the military, or does it discriminate against men by ignoring such issues as (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Line Joranger (2012). The World of Psychiatry and the World of War: Foucault's Use of Metaphors in Le Pouvoir Psychiatrique. History of European Ideas 39 (4):583-604.score: 12.0
    Summary In his series of lectures, Le pouvoir psychiatrique, Michel Foucault employs concepts from the military field of knowledge in order to analyse the founding scenes of psychiatry. I focus on three issues connected to Foucault's use of these military terms. Firstly, I examine why Foucault was reluctant to use concepts from sociology and psychology in Le pouvoir psychiatrique and how this affects the notions that he had formulated in his earlier work, Histoire de la folie. Secondly, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jane A. Russo (2012). The Social Diffusion of Psychoanalysis During the Brazilian Military Regime : Psychological Awareness in an Age of Political Repression. In Joy Damousi & Mariano Ben Plotkin (eds.), Psychoanalysis and Politics: Histories of Psychoanalysis Under Conditions of Restricted Political Freedom. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). Torture and the Military Profession. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 9.0
    The military claims to be an honourable profession, yet military torture is widespread. Why is the military violating its own values? Jessica Wolfendale argues that the prevalence of military torture is linked to military training methods that cultivate the psychological dispositions connected to crimes of obedience. While these methods are used, the military has no credible claim to professional status. Combating torture requires that we radically rethink the nature of the military profession and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Mark Coeckelbergh (2013). Drones, Information Technology, and Distance: Mapping the Moral Epistemology of Remote Fighting. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):87-98.score: 9.0
    Ethical reflection on drone fighting suggests that this practice does not only create physical distance, but also moral distance: far removed from one’s opponent, it becomes easier to kill. This paper discusses this thesis, frames it as a moral-epistemological problem, and explores the role of information technology in bridging and creating distance. Inspired by a broad range of conceptual and empirical resources including ethics of robotics, psychology, phenomenology, and media reports, it is first argued that drone fighting, like other long-range (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Walter D. Fenz, Brain L. Kluck & C. Peter Bankart (1969). Effect of Threat and Uncertainty on Mastery of Stress. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):473.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. David L. Kohfeld (1969). Effects of the Intensity of Auditory and Visual Ready Signals on Simple Reaction Time. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (1p1):88.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. V. Tsyganov (forthcoming). Limits of Global Growth, Stagnation, Creativity and International Stability. AI and Society:1-8.score: 9.0
    Arising restrictions of global economic growth due to limited natural resources and capacity of the biosphere adversely affect on people level of life and future expectation. That leads to mass depression and social instability. To consider this problem, psycho-physiological model of onward hedonist in consumer society is developed and investigated. This model is based on the fact that human nature generates a growing desire, needs to progress. After reaching the limits of growth, member of consumer society feel persistent negative emotions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jim Storr (2009). The Human Face of War. Continuum.score: 8.0
    This highly original book calls for, and suggests, a new way of considering war and warfare.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jessica Wolfendale (2008). Performance-Enhancing Technologies and Moral Responsibility in the Military. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):28 – 38.score: 7.0
    New scientific advances have created previously unheard of possibilities for enhancing combatants' performance. Future war fighters may be smarter, stronger, and braver than ever before. If these technologies are safe, is there any reason to reject their use? In this article, I argue that the use of enhancements is constrained by the importance of maintaining the moral responsibility of military personnel. This is crucial for two reasons: the military's ethical commitments require military personnel to be morally responsible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Sylvia Terbeck, Guy Kahane, Sarah McTavish, Julian Savulescu, Neil Levy, Miles Hewstone & Philip Cowen (2013). Beta Adrenergic Blockade Reduces Utilitarian Judgement. Biological Psychology 92 (2):323-328.score: 6.0
    Noradrenergic pathways are involved in mediating the central and peripheral effects of physiological arousal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in moral decision-making. We studied the effects in healthy volunteers of propranolol (a noradrenergic beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) on moral judgement in a set of moral dilemmas pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Propranolol (40 mg orally) (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Brenda L. Connors, Richard Rende & Timothy J. Colton (2013). Predicting Individual Differences in Decision-Making Process From Signature Movement Styles: An Illustrative Study of Leaders. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 6.0
    There has been a surge of interest in examining the utility of methods for capturing individual differences in decision-making style. We illustrate the potential offered by Movement Pattern Analysis (MPA), an observational methodology that has been used in business and by the U.S. Department of Defense to record body movements that provide predictive insight into individual differences in decision-making motivations and actions. Twelve military officers participated in an intensive two-hour interview that permitted detailed and fine-grained observation and coding of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Martin Lövdén Johan Mårtensson (2011). Do Intensive Studies of a Foreign Language Improve Associative Memory Performance? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 6.0
    Formal education has been proposed to shape life-long cognitive development. Studies reporting that gains from cognitive training transfer to untrained tasks suggest direct effects of mental activity on cognitive processing efficiency. However, associative-memory practice has not been known to produce transfer effects, which is odd considering that the key neural substrate of associative memory, the hippocampus, is known to be particularly plastic. We investigated whether extremely intensive studies of a foreign language, entailing demands on associative memory, cause improvements in associative-memory (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Olesia Kutska (2014). Радянська Пропаганда Серед Своїх Військ Напередодні Вступу Червоної Армії На Територію Країн Європи (Іі Пол. 1944 Року). Схід 6:211-217.score: 6.0
    The paper analyzes the content of Soviet propaganda and agitation used in working with the Red Army personnel in the European theater of military operations at the final stage of World War II. The author identifies the interdependence between the ideological work among the Soviet troops and political relations of the USSR with the European countries which the Red Army planned to enter and with guideline documents on organization and carrying out of outreach activities. It is demonstrated that the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dov Levin (2008). Why Following the Rules Matters: The Customs of War and the Case of the Texas War of Independence. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2):116-135.score: 5.0
    It is commonly assumed that the pre-codified, customary law of war had little true influence on the decisions or behavior of combatants in the western world. Evaluating this assumption concerning the custom (or norm) of the giving of quarter to enemy combatants in the Texas War of Independence of 1835--1836, this paper finds a strong and widely accepted norm on this subject already by the early 19th century, which exerted significant influence on the behavior in and the results and consequences (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. George R. Lucas Jr (2010). Postmodern War. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (4):289-298.score: 5.0
    This article, an introduction to a special issue of the Journal of Military Ethics devoted to emerging military technologies, elaborates the present status of certain predictions about the future of warfare and combat made by postmodern essayist, Umberto Eco, during the First Gulf War in 1991. The development of military robotics, innovations in nanotechnology, prospects for the biological, psychological, and neurological ?enhancement? of combatants themselves, combined with the increasing use of nonlethal weapons and the advent of cyber (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas F. Cleary (ed.) (2008). Training the Samurai Mind: A Bushido Sourcebook. Distributed in the United States by Random House, Inc..score: 4.0
    Honor, fearlessness, calm, decisive action, strategic thinking, and martial prowess have been the hallmarks of the Japanese samurai culture through the ages. Their ethos is known as bushido, or the way of the warrior-knight. Here is an insider’s view of the samurai—their moral and psychological development, the ethical standards they strive to uphold, their training in both martial arts and strategy, and the enormous role that the traditions of Shintoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism had in influencing their ideals. Thomas Cleary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Leslie E. Sekerka, Richard P. Bagozzi & Richard Charnigo (2009). Facing Ethical Challenges in the Workplace: Conceptualizing and Measuring Professional Moral Courage. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):565 - 579.score: 4.0
    Scholars have shown renewed interest in the construct of courage. Recent studies have explored its theoretical underpinnings and measurement. Yet courage is generally discussed in its broad form to include physical, psychological, and moral features. To understand a more practical form of moral courage, research is needed to uncover how ethical challenges are effectively managed in organizational settings. We argue that professional moral courage (PMC) is a managerial competency. To describe it and derive items for scale development, we studied managers (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Elisa A. Hurley (2010). Combat Trauma and the Moral Risks of Memory Manipulating Drugs. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):221-245.score: 4.0
    To date, 1.7 million US military service personnel have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Of those, one in five are suffering from diagnosable combat-stress related psychological injuries including Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). All indications are that the mental health toll of the current conflicts on US troops and the medical systems that care for them will only increase. Against this backdrop, research suggesting that the common class of drugs known as beta-blockers might prevent the onset of PTSD is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Rachel Kalbeitzer (2009). Psychologists and Interrogations: Ethical Dilemmas in Times of War. Ethics and Behavior 19 (2):156 – 168.score: 4.0
    In recent years, ethical concerns have emerged among psychologists, psychiatrists, and physicians about interrogating inmates detained at U.S. military prison camps, such as Guantanamo Bay, or consulting on such interrogations. These concerns have escalated to levels necessitating the three major associations—the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American Medical Association—to formulate position statements on these issues. Within the psychological community, two divergent schools of thought have developed, and this article explores the role of psychologists in these (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. C. Heike Schotten (2012). Reading Nietzsche in the Wake Of the 2008-09 War on Gaza. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):67-82.score: 4.0
    This paper argues for a psychological understanding of Nietzsche's categories of master and slave morality. Disentangling Nietzsche's parallel discourses of strength, superiority, and spirituality in the first essay of On the Genealogy of Morals, I argue that master and slave morality are better understood as ethical practices of the self than surrogates for either a binary classification of strength and weakness or a political demarcation of oppressor and oppressed. In doing so, I offer an application of this analysis to the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Salahaddin Mahmudi-Azer (2006). Arms Trade and its Impact on Global Health. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):81-93.score: 4.0
    The most obvious adverse impact of the arms trade on health is loss of life and maiming from the use of weapons in conflicts. Wealthy countries suffer damage to their health and human services when considerable resources are diverted to military expenditure. However, the relative impact of military expenditures and conflict on third world countries is much greater, and often devastating, by depriving a significant portion of the population of essential food, medicine, shelter, education, and economic opportunities. Further, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Patrick Madigan (2011). The Sorrow That Dare Not Say its Name: The Inadequate Father, the Motor of History. Heythrop Journal 52 (5):739-750.score: 4.0
    Although the following essay is literary-philosophical, it arose from a practical interest. I have been struck by how widespread today is the complaint about the ‘inadequate father’. Of course a father may be inadequate in diverse ways, either absconding, absent and weak, or overbearing, bullying, and tyrannical, or some combination of these. Further, I am not restricting the term ‘father’ to its narrow biological sense, but using it rather as a metaphor for any institution or structure which an individual or (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David Alastair Lindsay Coldwell & Chris William Callaghan (2013). Specific Organizational Citizenship Behaviours and Organizational Effectiveness: The Development of a Conceptual Heuristic Device. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1).score: 4.0
    Organizational citizenship behaviour has generally been associated with organizational effectiveness. However, recent research has shown that this may not always be the case and that certain types of organizational citizenship behaviour such as compulsory citizenship behaviour, may be inimical to the fulfillment of formal goals and organizational effectiveness. Using military historical and business organizational secondary data, the paper maintains that extreme variance in either organizational (task) or personal (social psychological) support organizational citizenship behaviour generates entropic citizenship behaviour which derails (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2003). Psychiatric Consequences of WTC Collapse and the Gulf War. Mens Sana Monographs 1 (1):5.score: 4.0
    Along with political, economic, ethical, rehabilitative and military dimensions, psychopathological sequelae of war and terrorism also deserve our attention. The terrorist attack on the World Trade Centre ( W.T.C.) in 2001 and the Gulf War of 1990-91 gave rise to a number of psychiatric disturbances in the population, both adult and children, mainly in the form of Post-traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). Nearly 75,000 people suffered psychological problems in South Manhattan alone due to that one terrorist attack on the WTC (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 51