Search results for 'Psychotherapy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth S. Pope (2007). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide. Jossey-Bass.score: 24.0
    Praise for Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling, Third Edition "This is absolutely the best text on professional ethics around. . . . This is a refreshingly open and inviting text that has become a classic in the field." —Derald Wing Sue, professor of psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University "I love this book! And so will therapists, supervisors, and trainees. In fact, it really should be required reading for every mental health professional and aspiring professional. . . . And it (...)
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  2. M. Andrew Holowchak (2014). Psychotherapy as Science or Knack? A Critique of the Hermeneutic Defense. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 45 (2):223-238.score: 24.0
    Psychoanalysis, in Freud’s day and our own, has met with and continues to meet with staunch opposition from critics. The most ruinous criticism comes from philosophers, with a special interest in science, who claim psychoanalysis does not measure up to the above-board canons of acceptable scientific practices and, thus, is not scientific. It is common today to direct such criticisms to all metempirical forms of psychotherapy—i.e., psychotherapies that in no way concern themselves with grounding their claims with empirical research. (...)
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  3. Jaak Panksepp (2002). On the Animalian Values of the Human Spirit: The Foundational Role of Affect in Psychotherapy and the Evolution of Consciousness. European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health 5 (3):225-245.score: 24.0
  4. Alan C. Tjeltveit (1999). Ethics and Values in Psychotherapy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Ethics and Values in Psychotherapy examines the ways in which the ethical convictions of both therapist and client contribute to the practical process of psychotherapy. Practitioners are increasingly focusing on the issue of their extensive--and often problematic--ethical influence on clients as they attempt to agree on guidelines and standards for professional practice. Alan C. Tjeltveit argues that any discussion of ethical practice in psychotherapy must be carried out in connection with traditional ethical theories. The author draws on (...)
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  5. Derk Pereboom (1994). Stoic Psychotherapy in Descartes and Spinoza. Faith and Philosophy 11 (4):592-625.score: 24.0
    The psychotherapeutic theories of Descartes and Spinoza are heavily influenced by Stoicism. Stoic psychotherapy has two central features. First, we have a remarkable degree of voluntary control over our passions, and we can and should exercise this control to keep ourselves from having any irrational passions at all. Second, the universe is determined by the providential divine will, and in any situation we can and should align ourselves with this divine will in order to achieve equanimity. Whereas Descartes largely (...)
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  6. Ian R. Owen (2006). Psychotherapy and Phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. Lincoln: iUniverse.score: 24.0
  7. Bruce E. Wampold (2001). The Great Psychotherapy Debate: Models, Methods, and Findings. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 24.0
    The Great Psychotherapy Debate: Models, Methods, and Findings comprehensively reviews the research on psychotherapy to dispute the commonly held view that the benefits of psychotherapy are derived from the specific ingredients contained in a given treatment (medical model). The author reviews the literature related to the absolute efficacy of psychotherapy, the relative efficacy of various treatments, the specificity of ingredients contained in established therapies, effects due to common factors, such as the working alliance, adherence and allegiance (...)
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  8. Roger Frie (ed.) (2003). Understanding Experience: Psychotherapy and Postmodernism. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Understanding Experience: Psychotherapy and Postmodernism is a collection of innovative interdisciplinary essays that explore the way we experience and interact with each other and the world around us. The authors address the postmodern debate in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis through clinical and theoretical discussion and offer a view of the person that is unique and relevant today. The clinical work of Binswanger, Boss, Fromm, Fromm-Reichmann, Laing, and Lacan is considered alongside the theories of Buber, Heidegger, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre and (...)
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  9. Fredrik Svenaeus (2009). The Ethics of Self-Change: Becoming Oneself by Way of Antidepressants or Psychotherapy? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (2):169-178.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the differences between bringing about self-change by way of antidepressants versus psychotherapy from an ethical point of view, taking its starting point in the concept of authenticity. Given that the new antidepressants (SSRIs) are able not only to cure psychiatric disorders but also to bring about changes in the basic temperament structure of the person—changes in self-feeling—does it matter if one brings about such changes of the self by way of antidepressants or by way of (...)? Are antidepressants a less good alternative than psychotherapy because antidepressants are in some way less authentic than psychotherapy? And, if so, what does this mean exactly? In this paper I try to show that the self-change brought about by way of antidepressants challenges basic assumptions of authentic self-change that are deeply ingrained in our Western culture: that changes in self should be brought about by laborious ‘self-work’ in which one explores the deep layers of the self (the unconscious) and comes to realise who one really is and should become. To become oneself has been held to presuppose such a journey. While the assumed importance of self-work appears to be badly founded on closer inspection, the notions of exploring and knowing oneself appear to be more promising in fleshing out an ethical distinction between psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic practice with the help of the concept of authenticity. Psychotherapy, to a much greater extent than psychopharmacological interventions, involves the whole profile of the self in its attempts to effect a change, not only in the temperament but also in the character of the person in question, and this is important from an ethical point of view. In the article, the concepts of self-change, authenticity, temperament and character are presented and used in order to understand and flesh out the relevant ethical differences between the practice of psychotherapy and the use of antidepressants. Looping, collective effects of psychopharmacological self-change in a cultural context are also considered in this context. (shrink)
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  10. Hakam Al-Shawi (2006). Psychotherapy's Philosophical Values: Insight or Absorption? [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):159 - 179.score: 24.0
    According to insight-oriented psychotherapies, the change clients undergo during therapy results from insights gained into the "true" nature of the self, which entail greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. In this paper, I question such claims through a critical examination of the epistemological and metaphysical values underlying such forms of therapy. I claim that such psychotherapeutic practices are engaged in a process that subtly "absorbs" clients into the therapist's philosophical framework which is characterized by a certain problematic conception of subjectivity, knowledge, and (...)
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  11. Jeremy Holmes (1993). Between Art and Science: Essays in Psychotherapy and Psychiatry. Tavistock/Routledge.score: 24.0
    In the first collection of his essays to be published, Jeremy Holmes discusses the wider application of psychotherapy within psychiatry and suggests that psychoanalysis needs to escape from its esotericism by taking into account contemporary advances in cognitive science, family therapy and the realities of psychiatric work in a public health setting. Illustrating his arguments with literary as well as clinical examples, he emphasizes the importance of creativity in psychotherapy and the connections between the artistic and psychotherapeutic impulse.
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  12. Ian Parker (ed.) (1999). Deconstructing Psychotherapy. Sage Publications.score: 24.0
    This book takes the discursive and postmodern turn in psychotherapy a significant step forward and will be of interest to all those working in mental health who want to work wiht clients in ways that will facilitate challenges to oppression and processes of emancipation. It achieves this by: · reflecting on the role of psychotherapy in contemporary culture · developing critiques of language in psychotherapy that unravel its claims to personal truth · the reworking of a place (...)
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  13. Cynthia Baum-Baicker & Dominic A. Sisti (2012). Clinical Wisdom in Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Philosophical and Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):13.score: 24.0
    To precisely define wisdom has been an ongoing task of philosophers for millennia. Investigations into the psychological dimensions of wisdom have revealed several features that make exemplary persons "wise." Contemporary bioethicists took up this concept as they retrieved and adapted Aristotle's intellectual virtue of phronesis for applications in medical contexts. In this article, we build on scholarship in both psychology and medical ethics by providing an account of clinical wisdom qua phronesis in the context of the practice of psychoanalysis and (...)
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  14. [deleted]Moritz de Greck, Annette F. Bölter, Lisa Lehmann, Cornelia Ulrich, Eva Stockum, Björn Enzi, Thilo Hoffmann, Claus Tempelmann, Manfred Beutel, Jörg Frommer & Georg Northoff (2013). Changes in Brain Activity of Somatoform Disorder Patients During Emotional Empathy After Multimodal Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Somatoform disorder patients show a variety of emotional disturbances including impaired emotion recognition and increased empathic distress. In a previous paper, our group showed that several brain regions involved in emotional processing, such as the parahippocampal gyrus and other regions, were less activated in pre-treatment somatoform disorder patients (compared to healthy controls) during an empathy task. Since the parahippocampal gyrus is involved in emotional memory, its decreased activation might reflect the repression of emotional memories (which - according to psychoanalytical concepts (...)
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  15. Richard Hamilton (2013). The Frustrations of Virtue: The Myth of Moral Neutrality in Psychotherapy. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):485-492.score: 24.0
    This article questions a number of widely held views of the role of values in psychotherapy. It begins with a discussion of the now largely discredited view that psychotherapy can be value free. It also broadens this challenge to question the popular idea that values form an inescapable part of the therapeutic encounter. While this view is correct in outline, it is necessary to reject the underlying conception of values as largely arbitrary preferences that the client and the (...)
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  16. [deleted]Alessandro Salvini, Elena Faccio, Giuseppe Mininni, Diego Romaioli, Sabrina Cipolletta & Gianluca Castelnuovo (2012). Change in Psychotherapy: A Dialogical Analysis Single-Case Study of a Patient with Bulimia Nervosa. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Starting from the critical review of various motivational frameworks of change that have been applied to the study of eating disorders, the present paper provides an alternative conceptualization of the change in psychotherapy presenting a single case study. We analysed six psychotherapeutic conversations with a bulimic patient and found out narratives “for” and “against” change. We read them in terms of tension between dominance and exchange in I-positions, as described by Hermans. These results indicate that the dialogical analysis of (...)
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  17. Arthur Still (2012). The Historical and Philosophical Context of Rational Psychotherapy: The Legacy of Epictetus. Karnac.score: 24.0
    The place of rationality in Stoicism and REBT -- Ellis and Epictetus: dialogue vs. method in psychotherapy -- The intellectual origins of Rational Psychotherapy: twentieth-century writers -- REBT and rationality: philosophical approaches -- Rationality and the shoulds -- When did a psychologist last discuss "chagrin"?: American psychology's continuing moral project -- The social psychology of "pseudoscience": a brief history -- Historical aspects of mindfulness and self-acceptance in psychotherapy -- Marginalisation is not unbearable, is it even undesirable?
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  18. Stephen Wilmot (2009). Psychotherapy and Distributive Justice: A Rawlsian Analysis. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):67-75.score: 24.0
    In this paper I outline an approach to the distribution of resources between psychotherapy modalities in the context of the UK’s health care system, using recent discussions of Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy as a way of highlighting resourcing issues. My main goal is to offer an approach that is just, and that accommodates the diversity of different schools of psychotherapy. In order to do this I draw extensively on the theories of Justice and of Political Liberalism developed by (...)
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  19. [deleted]Heinz Boeker, André Richter, Holger Himmighoffen, Jutta Ernst, Laura Bohleber, Elena Hofmann, Johannes Vetter & Georg Northoff (2013). Essentials of Psychoanalytic Process and Change: How Can We Investigate the Neural Effects of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Individualized Neuro-Imaging? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    The paper focuses on the essentials of psychoanalytic process and change and the question of how the neural correlates and mechanisms of psychodynamic psychotherapy can be investigated. The psychoanalytic approach aims at enabling the patient to “remember, repeat and work through” concerning explicit memory. Moreover, the relationship between analyst and patient establishes a new affective configuration which enables a reconstruction of the implicit memory. If psychic change can be achieved it corresponds to neuronal transformation. Individualized neuro-imaging requires controlling and (...)
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  20. [deleted]Gianluca Castelnuovo (2010). Empirically Supported Treatments in Psychotherapy: Towards an Evidence-Based or Evidence-Biased Psychology in Clinical Settings? Frontiers in Psychology 1:27-27.score: 24.0
    The field of research and practice in psychotherapy has been deeply influenced by two different approaches: the empirically supported treatments (ESTs) movement, linked with the evidence-based medicine (EBM) perspective and the “Common Factors” approach, typically connected with the “Dodo Bird Verdict”. About the first perspective, since 1998 a list of ESTs has been established in mental health field. Criterions for “well-established” and “probably efficacious” treatments have arisen. The development of these kinds of paradigms was motivated by the emergence of (...)
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  21. Amihud Gilead (1999). Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press 169--181.score: 24.0
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory of (...)
     
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  22. Michael Gruber (2008). An Unknown Destiny: Terror, Psychotherapy, and Modern Initiation: Readings in Nietzsche, Heidegger, Steiner. Lindisfarne Books.score: 24.0
    From ornithology to a love supreme : overcoming the forces of gravity, and the teaching of Amor Fati -- Zarathustra's convalescence : cognitive expansions and inner wisdom -- With Nietzsche on the road from revenge to redemption -- Traumatic pain : psychotherapeutic conversation between mediumship and soul wisdom -- Psychotherapy as a vocation : giving voice to soul -- Intuitive and inceptual thinking : the meditative paths of Steiner and Heidegger -- "While my conscience explodes".
     
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  23. Robert Langs (1999). Psychotherapy and Science. Sage.score: 24.0
    Through a warm and passionate investigation of the most fundamental properties of human behaviour, Psychotherapy and Science shows how a scientific foundation for psychotherapy is both necessary and feasible. Addressing psychotherapy's need for a coherent theoretical grounding, the book argues that there are striking parallels between the emotion-processing mind and phenomena that have been scientifically observed and charted in the areas of evolution, the immune system and the brain. The idea that scientific theories might be applied to (...)
     
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  24. Ernest Lawrence Rossi (2004). Art, Beauty and Truth: The Psychosocial Genomics of Consciousness, Dreams, and Brain Growth in Psychotherapy and Mind-Body Healing. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Assn 7 (3):10-17.score: 24.0
  25. Les Todres (2007). Embodied Enquiry: Phenomenological Touchstones for Research, Psychotherapy, and Spirituality. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Drawing on a particular emphasis within the phenomenological tradition as exemplified by Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Eugene Gendlin, this book considers the role of the lived body as a way of knowing and being. The author, a psychologist, psychotherapist and qualitative researcher pursues this theme within three practical contexts that illustrate some of the nuances of embodied enquiry: qualitative research, psychotherapy, spirituality. The three sections of the book also provide examples of how embodied enquiry is not just a philosophical perspective (...)
     
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  26. Jane K. Hook (2000). Beyond the Surface: Covert Subjective Experience and Unconscious Communication in Psychotherapy. Psychoanalytic Social Work 7 (4):1-48.score: 21.0
  27. Donald Robertson (2010). The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (Cbt): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. Karnac.score: 21.0
    Pt. I. Philosophy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) -- Ch. 1. The "philosophical origins" of CBT -- Ch. 2. The beginning of modern cognitive therapy -- Ch. 3. A brief history of philosophical therapy -- Ch. 4. Stoic philosophy and psychology -- Ch. 5. Rational emotion in stoicism and CBT -- Ch. 6 Stoicism and Ellis's rational therapy (REBT) -- Pt. II. The stoic armamentarium -- Ch. 7. Contemplation of the ideal stage -- Ch. 8. Stoic mindfulness of the "here and (...)
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  28. Susan James & Gary Foster (2003). Narratives and Culture: "Thickening" the Self for Cultural Psychotherapy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):62-79.score: 21.0
    The dominant framework for understanding selfhood in contemporary psychology has been one that privileges a highly individualistic conception of self. This is reflected in both the language and approaches of psychotherapy where the influence of contextual factors are given marginal consideration in order to maintain some type of 'objectivity' or 'neutrality' in counseling. We argue that an understanding of selfhood which does not take into account the 'relational' nature of selfhood as well as the cultural or historical context of (...)
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  29. Philip Cushman (1993). Psychotherapy and Moral Discourse. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):103-113.score: 21.0
    Argues that psychotherapy's claim to be a universal scientific practice that objectively treats ahistorical illnesses is untenable. PT is a cultural product, so it both reflects and reproduces its cultural context. Because cultural context is in part composed of moral traditions embedded in political structures, PT is unavoidably a moral practice with political consequences. Implicit moralities in current practices are discussed. Philosophical hermeneutics in PT practice are offered as an alternative. In a discussion of intersecting traditions, it is suggested (...)
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  30. Victor L. Schermer (2003). Spirit and Psyche: A New Paradigm for Psychology, Psychoanalysis, and Psychotherapy. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.score: 21.0
    This book explores the literature on spirituality as an important dimension of psychology, and explains the relationship between psychological treatment and ...
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  31. Kevin R. Smith (2009). Psychotherapy as Applied Science or Moral Praxis: The Limitations of Empirically Supported Treatment. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):34-46.score: 21.0
    Proponents of empirically supported treatment have argued that psychotherapists have an ethical obligation to make an EST the first choice in clinical practice. This paper challenges this idea. The EST program assumes a model of therapy as technology or applied science that poorly fits the reality of psychotherapeutic practice. The problems brought to therapy implicate fundamental questions regarding what constitutes a good life. A therapeutic response to such problems is not a technical means to change a circumscribed disorder, but an (...)
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  32. Lynne Gabriel (2005). Speaking the Unspeakable: The Ethics of Dual Relationships in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Are dual relationships always detrimental? Speaking the Unspeakable provides an in-depth exploration of client-practitioner dual relationships, offering critical discussion and sustained narrative on thinking about and being in dual relationships. Lynne Gabriel draws on the experiences of both practitioners and clients to provide a clear summary of the complex and multidimensional nature of dual relationships. The beneficial as well as detrimental potential of such relationships is discussed and illustrated with personal accounts. Subjects covered include: · Roles and boundaries in dual (...)
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  33. Emmy Van Deurzen (2009). Psychotherapy and the Quest for Happiness. Sage.score: 21.0
    In this book, Emmy van Deurzen addresses the taboo subject of the moral role of psychotherapists and counselors.
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  34. Adelbert H. Jenkins (1997). Free Will and Psychotherapy: The Enhancement of Agency. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):1-12.score: 21.0
    Proposes that to the extent that psychotherapy allows the individual to exercise greater freedom in his or her life it does so through enhancing psychological agency. The conceptions of free will and of agency used here are influenced strongly by J. F. Rychlak's discussion of the human capacity for "dialectical" thinking. The author discusses these conceptions of agency in terms of some of R. Schafer's recent ideas regarding psychoanalytic psychotherapy. A. H. Jenkins further notes that this conception of (...)
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  35. Keren Bachi (2012). Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy: The Gap Between Practice and Knowledge. Society and Animals 20 (4):364-380.score: 21.0
    Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy is widely used, and the uses to which it can be put are still being developed. However, existing knowledge about this field is insufficient, and most of the research suffers from methodological problems that compromise its rigor. This review will explore research into the linked fields of Animal-Assisted Therapy and Equine-Assisted Activities/Therapies related to physical health. Existing knowledge of mental, emotional, and social applications of EAA/T is presented. Evaluation studies in the subfield suggest that people benefit from (...)
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  36. Edwin L. Hersch (2006). Philosophically-Informed Psychotherapy and the Concept of Transference. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 26 (1-2):221-234.score: 21.0
    The theoretical and philosophical assumptions underlying our psychological practices greatly affect the ways that clinicians in the mental health field go about their work and to some extent how successful at it they are. This paper attempts to illustrate this by describing how a careful and systematic look at the underlying philosophical presuppositions surrounding the concept of transference yielded clear clinical benefits to my own practice of psychotherapy. More specifically, by contrasting the philosophical paradigm implied in the classical definitions (...)
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  37. William J. Lyddon & Evan Bradford (1995). Philosophical Commitments and Therapy Approach Preferences Among Psychotherapy Trainees. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 15 (1):1-15.score: 21.0
    Examined the role of philosophical beliefs in psychotherapy approach preference. It was hypothesized that trainees would prefer approaches that most closely correspond to their personal philosophical beliefs. 59 students were given audiotaped presentations. Three dimensions of the Ss' philosophical commitments were examined in relation to their relative preferences for 3 therapy approaches: rationalist, constructivist and behavioral. Results show that Ss tended to prefer a specific approach that most corresponded to their own ontological, epistemological and causal commitments. This suggests a (...)
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  38. Leslie Prioleau, Martha Murdock & Nathan Brody (1983). An Analysis of Psychotherapy Versus Placebo Studies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):275.score: 21.0
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  39. Sarah Cusworth (2000). Moral Knowledge and the Problems of Psychotherapy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):25-35.score: 21.0
    The distinction between objective and subjective knowledge has a long philosophical history, but the modem version has ties to Hume's separation of reason and belief. The extraction of reason from mere habits of the mind raises its own problems concerning the possibility of knowledge . These problems are especially acute within the therapeutic context. Indeed, the inclusion of morals in psychotherapy is considered unethical. This arises from the assumption that morality is idiosyncratic and subjective whereas scientific knowledge is objective (...)
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  40. Brian Shiner, Leonard W. D'Avolio, Thien M. Nguyen, Maha H. Zayed, Bradley V. Watts & Louis Fiore (2012). Automated Classification of Psychotherapy Note Text: Implications for Quality Assessment in PTSD Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):698-701.score: 21.0
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  41. [deleted]Rita B. Ardito & Daniela Rabellino (2011). Therapeutic Alliance and Outcome of Psychotherapy: Historical Excursus, Measurements, and Prospects for Research. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 21.0
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  42. Elizabeth Rous & Andrew Clark (2013). Thinking Without Knowing – Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in the UK and Evidence‐Based Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):573-578.score: 21.0
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  43. [deleted]Daniel Collerton (2013). Psychotherapy and Brain Plasticity. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  44. Edwin E. Gantt (1994). Truth, Freedom and Responsibility in the Dialogues of Psychotherapy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):146-158.score: 21.0
    Explores the theoretical and ethical implications inherent in Freudian psychoanalysis, Rogerian client-centered therapy, and Existentialist psychotherapy, under the premise that these are essentially ideologically motivated utopian statements. Because each of these 3 traditions privileges an idyllic conception of mental health and well-being, achievable only through strict adherence to restrictive codes of prescribed beliefs and behaviors, they ultimately reduce human freedom and possibility. In contrast to these traditional approaches, an alternative which seeks to radically reunderstand psychotherapeutic theory and practice in (...)
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  45. [deleted]Chi Ting Connie Ng & Susan James (2013). “Directive Approach” for Chinese Clients Receiving Psychotherapy: Is That Really a Priority? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  46. Leston L. Havens (1989). A Safe Place: Laying the Groundwork of Psychotherapy. Harvard University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  47. Edward Boyne (ed.) (2003). Psychotherapy in Ireland. Columba Press.score: 21.0
  48. James Paul Gustafson (1992). Self-Delight in a Harsh World: The Main Stories of Individual, Marital, and Family Psychotherapy. W.W. Norton.score: 21.0
  49. Duane Halbur (2011). Developing Your Theoretical Orientation in Counseling and Psychotherapy. Pearson.score: 21.0
    Why theoretical orientation is important -- Incorporating theory into practice -- Top ten ways to find your theoretical orientation -- Six schools of thought and their theories of helping -- Case examples for integrating theory to practice.
     
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  50. David Healy (1990). The Suspended Revolution: Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Re-Examined. Faber and Faber.score: 21.0
     
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