Search results for 'Psychotherapy ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth S. Pope (2007). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide. Jossey-Bass.
    Praise for Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling, Third Edition "This is absolutely the best text on professional ethics around. . . . This is a refreshingly open and inviting text that has become a classic in the field." —Derald Wing Sue, professor of psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University "I love this book! And so will therapists, supervisors, and trainees. In fact, it really should be required reading for every mental health professional and aspiring professional. . . . (...)
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  2.  11
    Lynne Gabriel (2005). Speaking the Unspeakable: The Ethics of Dual Relationships in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Routledge.
    Are dual relationships always detrimental? Speaking the Unspeakable provides an in-depth exploration of client-practitioner dual relationships, offering critical discussion and sustained narrative on thinking about and being in dual relationships. Lynne Gabriel draws on the experiences of both practitioners and clients to provide a clear summary of the complex and multidimensional nature of dual relationships. The beneficial as well as detrimental potential of such relationships is discussed and illustrated with personal accounts. Subjects covered include: · Roles and boundaries in dual (...)
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  3.  30
    Fredrik Svenaeus (2009). The Ethics of Self-Change: Becoming Oneself by Way of Antidepressants or Psychotherapy? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (2):169-178.
    This paper explores the differences between bringing about self-change by way of antidepressants versus psychotherapy from an ethical point of view, taking its starting point in the concept of authenticity. Given that the new antidepressants (SSRIs) are able not only to cure psychiatric disorders but also to bring about changes in the basic temperament structure of the person—changes in self-feeling—does it matter if one brings about such changes of the self by way of antidepressants or by way of (...)? Are antidepressants a less good alternative than psychotherapy because antidepressants are in some way less authentic than psychotherapy? And, if so, what does this mean exactly? In this paper I try to show that the self-change brought about by way of antidepressants challenges basic assumptions of authentic self-change that are deeply ingrained in our Western culture: that changes in self should be brought about by laborious ‘self-work’ in which one explores the deep layers of the self (the unconscious) and comes to realise who one really is and should become. To become oneself has been held to presuppose such a journey. While the assumed importance of self-work appears to be badly founded on closer inspection, the notions of exploring and knowing oneself appear to be more promising in fleshing out an ethical distinction between psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic practice with the help of the concept of authenticity. Psychotherapy, to a much greater extent than psychopharmacological interventions, involves the whole profile of the self in its attempts to effect a change, not only in the temperament but also in the character of the person in question, and this is important from an ethical point of view. In the article, the concepts of self-change, authenticity, temperament and character are presented and used in order to understand and flesh out the relevant ethical differences between the practice of psychotherapy and the use of antidepressants. Looping, collective effects of psychopharmacological self-change in a cultural context are also considered in this context. (shrink)
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  4. Kenneth S. Pope (1991). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide for Psychologists. Jossey-Bass.
    The comprehensive guide to ethics "An excellent blend of case law, research evidence, down-to-earth principles, and practical examples from two authors with outstanding expertise. Promotes valuable understanding through case illustrations, self-directed exercises, and thoughtful discussion of such issues as cultural diversity."--Dick Suinn, president-elect 1998, American Psychological Association "The scenarios and accompanying questions will prove especially helpful to those who offer courses and workshops concerned with ethics in psychology."--Charles D. Spielberger, former president, American Psychological Association; distinguished research professor of (...)
     
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  5. Moshe HaLevi Spero (1986). Handbook of Psychotherapy and Jewish Ethics: Halakhic Perspectives on Professional Values and Techniques. Feldheim.
     
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  6.  40
    Alan C. Tjeltveit (1999). Ethics and Values in Psychotherapy. Routledge.
    Ethics and Values in Psychotherapy examines the ways in which the ethical convictions of both therapist and client contribute to the practical process of psychotherapy. Practitioners are increasingly focusing on the issue of their extensive--and often problematic--ethical influence on clients as they attempt to agree on guidelines and standards for professional practice. Alan C. Tjeltveit argues that any discussion of ethical practice in psychotherapy must be carried out in connection with traditional ethical theories. The author draws (...)
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  7.  14
    J. S. Callender (1998). Ethics and Aims in Psychotherapy: A Contribution From Kant. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):274-278.
    Psychotherapy is an activity which takes many forms and which has many aims. The present paper argues that it can be viewed as a form of moral suasion. Kant's concepts of free will and ethics are described and these are then applied to the processes and outcome of psychotherapy. It is argued that his ideas, by linking rationality, free will and ethics into a single philosophical system, offer a valuable theoretical framework for thinking about aims and (...)
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  8.  1
    G. Wilkinson (1986). Psychoanalysis and Analytic Psychotherapy in the NHS--A Problem for Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):87-94.
    I question the place of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy in the National Health Service (NHS), with reference to published material; and, particularly, in relation to primary care, health economics and medical ethics. I argue that there are pressing clinical, research, economic, and ethical reasons in support of the contention that an urgent review of the extent and impact of psychoanalytic practices in the health service is called for.
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  9. Duff R. Waring (2016). The Healing Virtues: Character Ethics in Psychotherapy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Healing Virtues explores the intersection of psychotherapy and virtue ethics - with an emphasis on the patient's role within a healing process. It considers how the common ground between the therapeutic process and the cultivation of virtues can inform the efforts of both therapist and patient. Within this book, the Duff R. Waring argues that there is a case for patient virtues that are crucially relevant to working through the problems in living that arise in psychotherapy, (...)
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  10. S. Bloch (1989). The Student with a Writing Block--The Ethics of Psychotherapy. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (3):153-158.
    The potential role of the psychotherapist as ethical interventionist is considered with reference to a patient who presented with a writing block. The case for the therapist to act paternalistically is followed by the counterargument which revolves around the respect for autonomy. A bridge between these two opposing positions is then offered which depends on viewing informed consent as a dynamic process. As part of this procedure it is made clear that while autonomy is the desired end-state of psychotherapy, (...)
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  11.  61
    J. Holmes (2000). Ethics and Values in Psychotherapy: Alan C Tjelveit, London, Routledge, 1999, 336 Pages, Pound17.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):478-479.
  12.  31
    Kurt Baier (1981). The Ethics of Behavior Modification:Behavior Therapy: Scientific, Philosophical, and Moral Foundations. Edward Erwin; Autonomy Psychotherapy: Authoritarian Control Versus Individual Choice. Lucien A. Buck. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (3):499-.
  13.  5
    Gavin Ivey (2014). The Ethics of Mandatory Personal Psychotherapy for Trainee Psychotherapists. Ethics and Behavior 24 (2):91-108.
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  14. A. A. Lazarus & G. O. Gabbard (1996). Teaching Ethics and Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 6:79-86.
     
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  15.  58
    David Zimmerman (2003). Why Richard Brandt Does Not Need Cognitive Psychotherapy, and Other Glad News About Idealized Preference Theories in Meta-Ethics. Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (3):373-394.
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  16.  4
    Frank Cioffi (1969). The Ethics of Psychoanalysis: The Theory and Method of Autonomous Psychotherapy, by Thomas S. Szasz. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 19 (75):189.
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  17.  8
    Rita Petrarca Teixeira & Maria Lucia Tiellet Nunes (1999). Psicoterapia E Ética: Uma Relação (in) Visível?; Psychotherapy and Ethics: An (in) Visible Relationship? Aletheia 10:17-24.
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  18.  7
    A. Crowden (2008). Professional Boundaries and the Ethics of Dual and Multiple Overlapping Relationships in Psychotherapy. Monash Bioethics Review 27 (4):10.
  19.  1
    Michael Lipson & Abigail Lipson (1996). Psychotherapy and the Ethics of Attention. Hastings Center Report 26 (1):17-22.
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  20. A. F. Smith (2000). Alan Tjeltveit, Ethics and Values in Psychotherapy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):231-239.
     
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  21. Victor White (1945). Psychotherapy and Ethics. New Blackfriars 26 (305):287-300.
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  22.  24
    Frank C. Richardson (2012). On Psychology and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):24-34.
    Virtue and Psychology: Pursuing Excellence in Ordinary Practices by Fowers represents the most extensive effort to date to mine the resources of virtue ethics for theory and practice in psychology. Building on this work, I explore some of the implications of the virtue ethics perspective for the fields of psychology and psychotherapy, including helping to overcome individualism and instrumentalism, elaborating a conception of “internal” as opposed to merely “external” goods, clarifying the nature of “character strengths,” developing further (...)
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  23.  24
    Sharon K. Anderson (2010). Ethics for Psychotherapists and Counselors: A Proactive Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Basics of awareness : knowing yourself -- Basics of awareness : privilege and social responsibility -- The process of acculturation : developing your professional ethical identity -- The ethical culture of psychotherapy -- "I can't believe it's not therapy" : boundaries of the psychotherapy relationship -- Confidentiality : a critical element of trust in the relationship -- Informed consent : the three-legged stool -- Making the most of supervision -- Ending psychotherapy : the good, the bad, and (...)
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  24. W. Brad Johnson & Gerald P. Koocher (eds.) (2011). Juggling Porcupines in Mental Health Practice: An Ethics Casebook From the Files of Experts. Oxford University Press.
     
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  25. Torbjörn Tännsjö (2011). Applied Ethics. A Defence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):397-406.
    Given a reasonable coherentist view of justification in ethics, applied ethics, as here conceived of, cannot only guide us, in our practical decisions, but also provide moral understanding through explanation of our moral obligations. Furthermore, applied ethics can contribute to the growth of knowledge in ethics as such. We put moral hypotheses to crucial test in individual cases. This claim is defended against the challenges from moral intuitionism and particularism.
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  26.  23
    Hakam Al-Shawi (2006). Psychotherapy's Philosophical Values: Insight or Absorption? [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):159 - 179.
    According to insight-oriented psychotherapies, the change clients undergo during therapy results from insights gained into the "true" nature of the self, which entail greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. In this paper, I question such claims through a critical examination of the epistemological and metaphysical values underlying such forms of therapy. I claim that such psychotherapeutic practices are engaged in a process that subtly "absorbs" clients into the therapist's philosophical framework which is characterized by a certain problematic conception of subjectivity, knowledge, and (...)
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  27.  3
    Brent D. Slife (2012). Virtue Ethics in Practice: The Greenbrier Academy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):35-42.
    Part of the development of ontological or “strong” relationality has been the exploration of its more applied aspects. My focus for this article is a therapeutic boarding school, which L. Jay Mitchell and I cofounded in West Virginia. I describe how our intention to base this school exclusively on strong relationality led us to employ Aristotle's virtue ethics. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  28. Susan Fairbairn & Gavin Fairbairn (eds.) (1987). Psychology, Ethics, and Change. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  29.  2
    Ruth Macklin (1984). Man, Mind and Morality: The Ethics of Behavior Control. Philosophical Review 93 (1):104-106.
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  30. Archie Smith (1982). The Relational Self Ethics & Therapy From a Black Church Perspective.
     
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  31.  16
    Kevin R. Smith (2009). Psychotherapy as Applied Science or Moral Praxis: The Limitations of Empirically Supported Treatment. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):34-46.
    Proponents of empirically supported treatment have argued that psychotherapists have an ethical obligation to make an EST the first choice in clinical practice. This paper challenges this idea. The EST program assumes a model of therapy as technology or applied science that poorly fits the reality of psychotherapeutic practice. The problems brought to therapy implicate fundamental questions regarding what constitutes a good life. A therapeutic response to such problems is not a technical means to change a circumscribed disorder, but an (...)
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  32. Andrew Thompson (1983). Ethical Concerns in Psychotherapy and Their Legal Ramifications. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  33.  10
    Cynthia Baum-Baicker & Dominic A. Sisti (2012). Clinical Wisdom in Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Philosophical and Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):13.
    To precisely define wisdom has been an ongoing task of philosophers for millennia. Investigations into the psychological dimensions of wisdom have revealed several features that make exemplary persons "wise." Contemporary bioethicists took up this concept as they retrieved and adapted Aristotle's intellectual virtue of phronesis for applications in medical contexts. In this article, we build on scholarship in both psychology and medical ethics by providing an account of clinical wisdom qua phronesis in the context of the practice of psychoanalysis (...)
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  34. Samuel Knapp (2012). Practical Ethics for Psychologists: A Positive Approach. American Psychological Association.
    Acknowledgments -- The legal floor and positive ethics -- Foundations of ethical behavior -- Ethical decision making -- Competence -- Informed consent, empowered collaboration, or shared decision making -- Multiple relationships and professional boundaries -- Confidentiality, privileged communications, and record keeping -- Life-endangering patients -- Forensic psychology -- Assessment -- Special topics in psychotherapy -- Business issues -- Psychologists as educators -- Consultation and clinical supervision -- Research and scholarship -- Afterwaord -- References -- Index -- About the (...)
     
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  35.  35
    Derek Hill & Caroline Jones (eds.) (2003). Forms of Ethical Thinking in Therapeutic Practice. Open University Press.
    Most books about ethics focus either on the origins of ethics, or on the application of ethical thinking to a single form of therapy. This book sets out to span a range of very different forms of therapy and explores the similarities and the differences between the ethical thinking of the practitioners concerned. By looking at ethical issues in different therapeutic settings the reader is challenged to reconsider the working assumptions which underpin familiar therapeutic practice. Readers of Forms (...)
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  36.  19
    Chris Mace (ed.) (1999). Heart and Soul: The Therapeutic Face of Philosophy. Routledge.
    Heart and Soul is a collection of essays which examine those concepts and questions which are at the heart of both psychotherapy and philosophy. Topics discussed include the nature of the self, motivation and subjectivity, the limits of certainty and subjectivity in interpersonal situations, and the scope of narrative, dialogue and therapy itself. Looking at the work of key figures such as Wittgenstein, Socrates, Kierkegaard, Foucault, Lacan and Klein, contributors draw on a wide range of philosophical approaches and examine (...)
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  37. R. Vos (2004). Coordinating the Norms and Values of Medical Research, Medical Practice and Patient Worlds—the Ethics of Evidence Based Medicine in Orphaned Fields of Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):166-170.
    Next SectionEvidence based medicine is rightly at the core of current medicine. If patients and society put trust in medical professional competency, and on the basis of that competency delegate all kinds of responsibilities to the medical profession, medical professionals had better make sure their competency is state of the art medical science. What goes for the ethics of clinical trials goes for the ethics of medicine as a whole: anything that is scientifically doubtful is, other things being (...)
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  38.  2
    E. K. Ledermann (1982). Ethics in Psychiatry--The Patient's Freedom and Bondage. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (4):191-194.
    Ethics is defined as the realm of the 'ought', the realm of conscience which postulates that Man has the freedom to carry out what he judges to be morally right. By such acts he realizes his freedom of making himself into a truer, more authentic person than he was before. A libertarian psychotherapy, based on this ethic, is outlined. Medical science (as all science) belongs to the realm of the 'is' and postulates that the phenomena which it studies (...)
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  39.  16
    W. Brad Johnson & Gerald P. Koocher (eds.) (2011). Ethical Conundrums, Quandaries, and Predicaments in Mental Health Practice: A Casebook From the Files of Experts. Oxford University Press.
    Is it ethical to treat a death row inmate only to stabilize him or her for eventual execution? What happens when a military provider receives highly sensitive intelligence from a client?
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  40.  16
    Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.) (2011). Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This book considers coercion within the healing and ethical framework of therapeutic relationships and partnerships at all levels, and addresses the universal ...
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  41.  26
    Julius Sim (1997). Ethical Decision-Making in Therapy Practice. Butterworth-Heinemann.
    The text is extensively referenced, but practical in its approach, giving real life examples and cases based on therapeutic practice.
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  42. Thomas Szasz (2009). Antipsychiatry: Quackery Squared. Syracuse University Press.
    Antipsychiatry : alternative psychiatry -- The doctor of irresponsibility -- The trickster and the tricked -- Antipsychiatry and anti-art -- Antipsychiatry abroad.
     
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  43.  25
    Fabrice Jotterand, Shawn M. McClintock, Archie A. Alexander & Mustafa M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). Neuroethics 3 (1):13-22.
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his or her cognitive abilities (...)
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  44.  13
    Wei-Lun Lee (2009). 心理治療的倫理現場 (Psychotherapy as a Locale for Ethical Care). Schutzian Research 1:67-83.
    The aim of this paper is to advance the understanding of psychotherapy as ethical care, a mode of healing practiced in societies rich in the phenomenaconcerning the operations of collective life. By contemplating and establishing the four concepts: situated negativity, therapeutic locale, bodily experience(insituated negativity), and speech as action, the author is able to delineate the modes of therapeutic interactions right at the locale between the therapist andthe patient in order to disclose the structure of interpersonal thwartedness and connectedness (...)
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  45.  39
    Jurrit Bergsma & Bertha Mook (1998). Ethical Considerations in Psychotherapeutic Systems. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (4):371-381.
    In the process of individual psychotherapy, the client and the therapist work together towards clarifying the client's problems, unlocking vicious circles, opening new perspectives and creating a new narrative congruent with the client's experiencing. The real and undeniable situation in individual psychotherapy across different therapeutic systems is that therapists enter the therapeutic encounter equipped with their own vision of humanity and their own particular theory and methods of psychotherapy. Through the differences in power between therapists and clients (...)
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  46.  9
    Karl-Ernst Bühler (2005). Euphoria, Ecstacy, Inebriation, Abuse, Dependence, and Addiction: A Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):79-87.
    A conceptual analysis of basic notions of addictiology, i.e., Euphoria, Ecstasy, Inebriation, Abuse, Dependence, and Addiction was presented. Three different forms of dependence were distinguished: purely psychic, psycho-physiological, and purely somatic dependence. Two kinds of addiction were differentiated, i.e. appetitive and deprivative addiction. The conceptual requirements of addiction were discussed. Keeping these in mind some ethical problems of drug therapy and psychotherapy were explained. Criteria for the assessment of therapeutic approaches are suggested: effectiveness, side effects, economic, ethic, and esthetic (...)
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  47.  14
    Jason A. Beyer (2001). Is the Current Practice of Psychotherapy Morally Permissible? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):85-105.
    This essay aims to morally evaluate psychotherapy as it is currently practiced through the lens of sales/exchange ethics. The main focus of the essay is on psychotherapists’ claims to special expertise at diagnosing and treating mental illness. I review the research evidence relevant to these claims and conclude that these claims are not supported by the available evidence. Psychotherapists do not appear to be any better than actuarial tests at diagnosing mental illnesses, and meta-analyses of psychotherapy outcome (...)
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  48.  18
    Shawn Fabrice Jotterand, Archie M. McClintock, Mustafa A. Alexander & M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (Vns) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (Trd). Neuroethics 3 (1).
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his or her cognitive abilities (...)
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  49.  11
    Kevin A. Aho (2012). Assessing the Role of Virtue Ethics in Psychology: A Commentary on the Work of Blaine Fowers, Frank Richardson, and Brent Slife. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):43-49.
    Drawing on the work of Fowers, Richardson, and Slife, this commentary offers an overview and critical assessment of the theory and practice of virtue ethics in psychology. The commentary highlights the importance of a hermeneutic or relational understanding of selfhood and the value of interpreting human meanings within the context of a shared tradition. I conclude with some critical remarks that focus on reconciling the assumptions of naturalism with hermeneutic philosophy, the issue of conservatism in virtue ethics, and (...)
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  50.  13
    Moshe Halevi Spero (1983). Modern Psychotherapy and Halakhic Values: An Approach Toward Consensus in Values and Practice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (3):287-316.
    In this paper, I have examined in some detail a number of examples of actual and potential consensus between Jewish ethics and the practice of modern psychotherapy, psychology, and psychiatry. Moreover, I have posited cpecific halakhic models which represent analogies to modern psychotherapeutic principles and practices, which through analogy lend specific halakhic guidelines to modern practice. The unitary halakhic approach presented here is thus both heuristic – in that it seeks to demonstrate the ways in which psychotherapeutic processes (...)
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