Search results for 'Psychotherapy, Rational-Emotive' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Arthur Still (2012). The Historical and Philosophical Context of Rational Psychotherapy: The Legacy of Epictetus. Karnac.score: 324.0
    The place of rationality in Stoicism and REBT -- Ellis and Epictetus: dialogue vs. method in psychotherapy -- The intellectual origins of Rational Psychotherapy: twentieth-century writers -- REBT and rationality: philosophical approaches -- Rationality and the shoulds -- When did a psychologist last discuss "chagrin"?: American psychology's continuing moral project -- The social psychology of "pseudoscience": a brief history -- Historical aspects of mindfulness and self-acceptance in psychotherapy -- Marginalisation is not unbearable, is it even undesirable?
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  2. Donald Robertson (2010). The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (Cbt): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. Karnac.score: 308.0
    Pt. I. Philosophy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) -- Ch. 1. The "philosophical origins" of CBT -- Ch. 2. The beginning of modern cognitive therapy -- Ch. 3. A brief history of philosophical therapy -- Ch. 4. Stoic philosophy and psychology -- Ch. 5. Rational emotion in stoicism and CBT -- Ch. 6 Stoicism and Ellis's rational therapy (REBT) -- Pt. II. The stoic armamentarium -- Ch. 7. Contemplation of the ideal stage -- Ch. 8. Stoic mindfulness of the "here and (...)
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  3. Arthur Still & Windy Dryden (1998). The Intellectual Origins of Rational Psychotherapy. History of the Human Sciences 11 (3):63-86.score: 195.0
    In this paper we attempt to understand the intellectual origins of Albert Ellis' Rational Psychotherapy (now known as Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy). In his therapeutic practice Ellis used a 'lumper' argument to replace the focus of change in psychoanalysis: not the lengthy uncovering and reworking of the individual's personal history, but the demands in self-talk through which the client is currently dis turbed. In constructing around this the persuasive (rhetorical) package that became his therapy, Ellis drew on a number of (...)
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  4. Brad Johnson (2008). Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and the God Image. In Glendon Moriarty & Louis Hoffman (eds.), God Image Handbook for Spiritual Counseling and Psychotherapy: Research, Theory, and Practice. Haworth Pastoral Press.score: 135.0
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  5. William Ferraiolo (2011). Donald Robertson, The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (2):239-243.score: 72.0
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  6. Bradley N. Seeman (2004). Whose Rationality? Which Cognitive Psychotherapy? International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):201-222.score: 60.0
    Richard Brandt’s “Second Puzzle” for utilitarianism asks: What is meant to count as benefit or utility? In addressing this puzzle, Brandt dismisses “objective” theories of utility as prejudging substantive moral issues and opts for “subjective” theories of utility based either on desire-satisfaction or happiness, so as to welcome people with a variety of substantive moral commitments into his utilitarian system. However, subjective theories have difficulties finding principled grounds for elevating one desire over another. Brandt attempts to circumvent the difficulties through (...)
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  7. Moritz de Greck, Annette F. Bölter, Lisa Lehmann, Cornelia Ulrich, Eva Stockum, Björn Enzi, Thilo Hoffmann, Claus Tempelmann, Manfred Beutel, Jörg Frommer & Georg Northoff (2013). Changes in Brain Activity of Somatoform Disorder Patients During Emotional Empathy After Multimodal Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 50.7
    Somatoform disorder patients show a variety of emotional disturbances including impaired emotion recognition and increased empathic distress. In a previous paper, our group showed that several brain regions involved in emotional processing, such as the parahippocampal gyrus and other regions, were less activated in pre-treatment somatoform disorder patients (compared to healthy controls) during an empathy task. Since the parahippocampal gyrus is involved in emotional memory, its decreased activation might reflect the repression of emotional memories (which - according to psychoanalytical concepts (...)
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  8. Jerome S. Bernstein (2005). Living in the Borderland: The Evolution of Consciousness and the Challenge of Healing Trauma. Brunner-Routledge.score: 43.0
    Living in the Borderland addresses the evolution of Western consciousness and describes the emergence of the 'Borderland,' a spectrum of reality that is beyond the rational yet is palpable to an increasing number of individuals. Building on Jungian theory, Jerome Bernstein argues that a greater openness to transrational reality experienced by Borderland personalities allows new possibilities for understanding and healing confounding clinical and developmental enigmas. In three sections, this book charts the evolution of Western consciousness, examines the psychological and clinical (...)
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  9. Christopher Hauke (2005). Human Being Human: Culture and the Soul. Routledge.score: 43.0
    Human Being Human explores the classical question What is a human being? and produces original and challenging insights in the process of providing an answer. In examining our human being, Christopher Hauke challenges the notion of human nature, questions the assumed superiority of human consciousness and rational thinking and pays close attention to the contradiction of living simultaneously as an autonomous individual and a member of the collective community. The main chapters include: Whose in Charge Here? Knowledge, Power and Human (...)
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  10. James Davies (2011). Positive and Negative Models of Suffering: An Anthropology of Our Shifting Cultural Consciousness of Emotional Discontent. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):188-208.score: 42.0
    I explore how many within modern industrial societies currently understand, manage, and respond to their emotional suffering. I argue that this understanding and management of suffering has radically altered in the last 30 years, creating a new model of suffering, “the negative model” (suffering is purposeless), which has largely replaced the “positive model” (suffering is purposeful) that prevailed in the 18th and 19th centuries. This shift has been hastened by what I call the “rationalization of suffering”—namely, the process by which (...)
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  11. Jean-Luc Mommaerts & Dirk Devroey (2013). From "Does It Work?" to "What is 'It'?": Implications for Voodoo, Psychotherapy, Pop-Psychology, Regular, and Alternative Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):274-288.score: 37.0
    Historically, "Healing Methods" (HMS) have not been based on rational theories. Of the thousands of HMs that have arisen over the ages, only a small number survive today, drawing their power and longevity mostly from their superior ability to act as a placebo within the context of modern-day culture, rather than through any other mode of action.When it comes to HMs, Western scientific culture has not yet evolved beyond a pre-scientific stage (Fancher 1995). A scientific analysis of the part played (...)
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  12. Richard Sorabji (2009). Emotions and the Psychotherapy of the Ancients. In Craig Steven Titus (ed.), Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom. Distributed by Catholic University of America Press.score: 26.0
  13. Christine Tappolet & Bruce Maxwell (2012). Rethinking Cognitive Mediation: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Perceptual Theory of Emotion. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 19 (1):1-12.score: 24.0
    Empirical assessments of Cognitive Behavioral Theory and theoretical considerations raise questions about the fundamental theoretical tenet that psychological disturbances are mediated by consciously accessible cognitive structures. This paper considers this situation in light of emotion theory in philosophy. We argue that the “perceptual theory” of emotions, which underlines the parallels between emotions and sensory perceptions, suggests a conception of cognitive mediation that can accommodate the observed empirical anomalies and one that is consistent with the dual-processing models dominant in cognitive psychology.
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  14. Jaak Panksepp (2002). On the Animalian Values of the Human Spirit: The Foundational Role of Affect in Psychotherapy and the Evolution of Consciousness. European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health 5 (3):225-245.score: 24.0
  15. Richard D. Lane, Lee Ryan, Lynn Nadel & Leslie Greenberg (forthcoming). Memory Reconsolidation, Emotional Arousal and the Process of Change in Psychotherapy: New Insights From Brain Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-80.score: 24.0
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  16. Frank M. Oppenheim (1977). Royce's Community: A Dimension Missing in Freud and James? Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 13 (2):173--190.score: 24.0
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916), philosopher of community, taught that social consciousness arises from ego-alter contrasts and is guided by taboos and, before George H. Mead, by reciprocal gestures. A major Roycean contribution was his five conditions for coexperiencing consciousness of genuine community. Related to Freud (via Putnam), Royce did early work on “identification theory” and helped midwife psychotherapy’s birth in America. Contrasting with William James’s basic differentiation of consciousness according to the quality of its contents (feeling, thought, and conduct), Royce preferred (...)
     
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  17. R. C. U'Ren (1987). The Rationalization of Psychotherapy. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 30 (4):586.score: 24.0
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  18. James Hillman (1960/1992). Emotion: A Comprehensive Phenomenology of Theories and Their Meaning for Therapy. Northwestern University Press.score: 22.0
    Routledge is now re-issuing this prestigious series of 204 volumes originally published between 1910 and 1965.
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  19. Daniel Collerton (2013). Psychotherapy and Brain Plasticity. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 22.0
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  20. Philip Brownell (2004). Perceiving You Perceiving Me: Self-Conscious Emotions and Gestalt Therapy. Gestalt! 8 (1).score: 22.0
  21. Colin Marshall (2012). Spinoza on Destroying Passions with Reason. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):139-160.score: 18.0
    Spinoza claims we can control any passion by forming a more clear and distinct idea of it. The interpretive consensus is that Spinoza is either wrong or over-stating his view. I argue that Spinoza’s view is plausible and insightful. After breaking down Spinoza’s characterization of the relevant act, I consider four existing interpretations and conclude that each is unsatisfactory. I then consider a further problem for Spinoza: how his definitions of ‘action’ and ‘passion’ make room for passions becoming action. I (...)
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  22. Moritz Matejka Matejka, Philipp Kazzer, Maria Seehausen, Malek Bajbouj, Gisela Margrit Klann-Delius, Gisela, Winfried Menninghaus, Arthur M. Jacobs, Hauke R. Heekeren & Kristin Prehn (2013). Talking About Emotion: Prosody and Skin Conductance Indicate Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Talking about emotion and putting feelings into words has been hypothesized to regulate emotion in psychotherapy as well as in everyday conversation. However, the exact dynamics of how different strategies of verbalization regulate emotion and how these strategies are reflected in characteristics of the voice has received little scientific attention. In the present study, we showed emotional pictures to 30 participants and asked them to verbally admit or deny an emotional experience or a neutral fact concerning the picture in a (...)
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  23. G. E. Vaillant (2008). Positive Emotions, Spirituality and the Practice of Psychiatry. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):48.score: 18.0
    _This paper proposes that eight positive emotions: awe, love (attachment), trust (faith), compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology; rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection. Specific religions, for all (...)
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  24. Roberto Viviani Enrico Benelli, Erhard Mergenthaler, Steffen Walter, Irene Messina, Marco Sambin, Anna Buchheim, Eun J. Sim (2012). Emotional and Cognitive Processing of Narratives and Individual Appraisal Styles: Recruitment of Cognitive Control Networks Vs. Modulation of Deactivations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Research in psychotherapy has shown that the frequency of use of specific classes of words (such as terms with emotional valence) in descriptions of scenes of affective relevance is a possible indicator of psychological affective functioning. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the neural correlates of these linguistic markers in narrative texts depicting core aspects of emotional experience in human interaction, and their modulation by individual differences in the propensity to use these markers. Emotional words activated both lateral and (...)
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  25. Amihud Gilead (1999). Human Affects as Properties of Cognitions in Spinoza's Philosophical Psychotherapy. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. 169--181.score: 18.0
    The Spinozistic essence is the factor of individuation of a particular or individual thing. Affects or emotions are properties of an essence, which, under the attribute of thought, is an idea, i.e., cognition. Such essence is the human mind, which is the idea of a particular actual body. Since our emotions are properties of our cognitions, whether adequate or not, concerning the state of our body, which reflects nature as a whole in a particular way, I entitle Spinoza’s theory of (...)
     
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  26. Robert Langs (1999). Psychotherapy and Science. Sage.score: 18.0
    Through a warm and passionate investigation of the most fundamental properties of human behaviour, Psychotherapy and Science shows how a scientific foundation for psychotherapy is both necessary and feasible. Addressing psychotherapy's need for a coherent theoretical grounding, the book argues that there are striking parallels between the emotion-processing mind and phenomena that have been scientifically observed and charted in the areas of evolution, the immune system and the brain. The idea that scientific theories might be applied to psychotherapy is thoroughly (...)
     
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  27. Christine Tappolet & Bruce Maxwell (2012). Gloomy Duck or Cheerful Rabbit? Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 19 (1):21-23.score: 16.0
  28. Aydan Gülerce (ed.) (2012). Re(Con)Figuring Psychoanalysis: Critical Juxtapositions of the Philosophical, the Sociohistorical and the Political in Our Times. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 16.0
    Leading international scholars present novel dialogues between different psychoanalytic orientations as well as between the particularities of diverse socio-cultural and historical contexts in order to offer critical insights which are ...
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  29. Sharon Lamb & Jeffrie G. Murphy (eds.) (2002). Before Forgiving: Cautionary Views of Forgiveness in Psychotherapy. OUP USA.score: 14.0
    For psychologists and psychotherapists, the notion of forgiveness has been enjoying a substantial vogue. For their patients, it holds the promise of "moving on" and healing emotional wounds. The forgiveness of others - and of one's self - would seem to offer the kind of peace that psychotherapy alone has never been able to provide. In this volume, psychologist Sharon Lamb and philosopher Jeffrie Murphy argue that forgiveness has been accepted as a therapeutic strategy without serious, critical examination. They intend (...)
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  30. Richard Friemann (2005). Emotional Backing and the Feeling of Deep Disagreement. Informal Logic 25 (1):51-63.score: 14.0
    I discuss Toulmin's (1964) concept of backing with respect to the emotional mode of arguing by examining an example from Fogelin (1985), where emotional backing justifies a warrant concerning when we should judge that a person is being pig-headed. While Fogelin 's treatment is consistent with contemporary emotion science, I show that it needs to be supplemented by therapeutic techniques by comparing an analysis of an emotional argument from Gilbert (1997). The introduction of psychotherapy into argumentation theory raises the question (...)
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  31. J. S. Callender (1998). Ethics and Aims in Psychotherapy: A Contribution From Kant. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):274-278.score: 14.0
    Psychotherapy is an activity which takes many forms and which has many aims. The present paper argues that it can be viewed as a form of moral suasion. Kant's concepts of free will and ethics are described and these are then applied to the processes and outcome of psychotherapy. It is argued that his ideas, by linking rationality, free will and ethics into a single philosophical system, offer a valuable theoretical framework for thinking about aims and ethical issues in psychotherapy.
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  32. Tim LeBon (2001). Wise Therapy: Philosophy for Counsellors. Continuum.score: 12.0
    Independent on Sunday October 2nd One of the country's lead­ing philosophical counsellers, and chairman of the Society for Philosophy in Practice (SPP), Tim LeBon, said it typically took around six 50 ­minute sessions for a client to move from confusion to resolution. Mr LeBon, who has 'published a book on the subject, Wise Therapy, said philoso­phy was perfectly suited to this type of therapy, dealing as it does with timeless human issues such as love, purpose, happiness and emo­tional challenges. `Wise (...)
     
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  33. Farhad Dalal (2002). Race, Colour and the Process of Racialization: New Perspectives From Group Analysis, Psychoanalysis, and Sociology. Brunner-Routledge.score: 8.0
    Farhad Dalal argues that people differentiate between races in order to make a distinction between the "haves" and "must-not-haves", and that this process is cognitive, emotional and political rather than biological. Examining the subject over the past thousand years, Race, Colour and the Process of Racialisation covers theories of racism and a general theory of difference based on the works of Fanon, Elias, Matte-Blanco and Foulkes, as well as application of this theory to race and racism. Farhad Dalal concludes that (...)
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  34. Kerry Gutridge (2010). Safer Self-Injury or Assisted Self-Harm? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):79-92.score: 8.0
    Psychiatric patients may try (or express a desire) to injure themselves in hospital in order to cope with overwhelming emotional pain. Some health care practitioners and patients propose allowing a controlled amount of self-injury to occur in inpatient facilities, so as to prevent escalation of distress. Is this approach an example of professional assistance with harm? Or, is the approach more likely to minimise harm, by ensuring safer self-injury? In this article, I argue that health care practitioners who use harm-minimisation (...)
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  35. Peter G. Stromberg (1993). Language and Self-Transformation: A Study of the Christian Conversion Narrative. Cambridge University Press.score: 8.0
    This is a study of how self-transformation may occur through the practice of reframing one's personal experience in terms of a canonical language: that is, a system of symbols that purports to explain something about human beings and the universe they live in. The Christian conversion narrative is used as the primary example here, but the approach used in this book also illuminates other practices such as psychotherapy in which people deal with emotional conflict through language.
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  36. H. J. Eysenck (1961). Psychoanalysis - Myth or Science? Inquiry 4 (1-4):1 – 15.score: 8.0
    In this paper an attempt is made to look at Freud's contribution from the point of view of its scientific validity. A factual survey is made of the results of psychoanalytic psychotherapy, of the kinds of facts and arguments used to support the psychoanalytic doctrine and of the experiments carried out to test it. The conclusion arrived at is that psychoanalysis and the theories associated with it is not a science, but a myth; adherence to it is based on emotion (...)
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  37. Pamela J. Birrell (2006). An Ethic of Possibility: Relationship, Risk, and Presence. Ethics and Behavior 16 (2):95 – 115.score: 8.0
    What does it mean to be ethical in psychotherapy? Does adherence to ethical codes and rules make a psychotherapist ethical? This article examines standard ways of thinking about ethics in the field and argues that these ways are inadequate, creating a false dichotomy between the ethical and the clinical, and that they are designed only for formal and contractual relationships, in which psychotherapy is more often personal and affecting. The ethic of care and the approach to ethics of Emmanuel Levinas (...)
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  38. Christopher D. Green (1996). Where Did the Word "Cognitive" Come From Anyway? [Journal (on-Line/Unpaginated)].score: 8.0
    Cognitivism is the ascendant movement in psychology these days. It reaches from cognitive psychology into social psychology, personality, psychotherapy, development, and beyond. Few psychologists know the philosophical history of the term, "cognitive," and often use it as though it were completely synonymous with "psychological" or "mental." In this paper, I trace the origins of the term "cognitive" in the ethical theories of the early 20th century, and through the logical positivistic philosophy of science of this century's middle part. In both (...)
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  39. Philip Spinhoven, A. J. Willem Van der Does, Richard Van Dyck & Ismay P. Kremers (2006). Autobiographical Memory in Depressed and Nondepressed Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder After Long‐Term Psychotherapy. Cognition and Emotion 20 (3-4):448-465.score: 8.0
  40. David A. Jopling (2008). Talking Cures and Placebo Effects. OUP Oxford.score: 8.0
    Psychoanalysis has had to defend itself from a barrage of criticism throughout its history. Nevertheless, there are many who claim to have been helped by this therapy, and who claim to have achieved genuine insight into their condition. But do the psychodynamic or exploratory psychotherapies - the so-called talking cures - really help clients get in touch with their "inner", "real" or "true" selves? Do clients make important discoveries about the real causes of their behaviours, emotions, and personalities? Are their (...)
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  41. Manuel de Vega, Arthur M. Glenberg & Arthur C. Graesser (eds.) (2008). Symbols and Embodiment: Debates on Meaning and Cognition. Oxford University Press.score: 8.0
    Cognitive scientists have a variety of approaches to studying cognition: experimental psychology, computer science, robotics, neuroscience, educational psychology, philosophy of mind, and psycholinguistics, to name but a few. In addition, they also differ in their approaches to cognition - some of them consider that the mind works basically like a computer, involving programs composed of abstract, amodal, and arbitrary symbols. Others claim that cognition is embodied - that is, symbols must be grounded on perceptual, motoric, and emotional experience. The existence (...)
     
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  42. Trish Sherwood (2001). Client Experience in Psychotherapy: What Heals and What Harms? Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 1 (2).score: 8.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine what heals and harms the client in the psychotherapeutic encounter, from the client's perspective. The experience of eight clients was explicated using a model based on Giorgi and Schweitzer. The counselling experienced as healing by clients has at its core a vibrantly warm and honest relationship where the client feels held in the safety of the good heart space of the counsellor. The counsellor is experienced as providing an intense beingness for the (...)
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  43. David Boadella (1987). Lifestreams: An Introduction to Biosynthesis. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 6.0
    CHAPTER EMOTIONAL EXPRESSION AND THE BODY The language of bio -energy It must be recognised at the outset that it is impossible for an individual not to ...
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  44. Christopher L. Edwards, Perrine Marie Ruby, Josie E. Malinowski, Paul D. Bennett & Mark T. Blagrove (2013). Dreaming and Insight. Frontiers in Psychology 4:979.score: 6.0
    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can (...)
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  45. Alvin David, Mark Moore & Dan Rusu (2002). Unconscious Information Processing, Hypnotic Amnesia, and the Misattribution of Arousal: Schachter and Singer's Theory Revised. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies 2 (1):23-33.score: 6.0
     
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  46. Lois Holzman (2013). Critical Psychology, Philosophy, and Social Therapy. Human Studies 36 (4):471-489.score: 6.0
    This article presents critical psychology in some new light. First, it presents the history of US critical psychology in terms of the overall foundation of its critique (identity-based, ideologically-based, and epistemologically-based). Second, it broadens the population that can be called critical psychologists. The argument is made to include: (1) philosophers of language, science, and mind critical of psychology’s foundational assumptions, conceptions, and methods of inquiry; and (2) non-professional, ordinary people who live their lives critical of psychology by eschewing mainstream approaches (...)
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