Search results for 'Public health laws' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Lainie Rutkow, Jon S. Vernick, Maxim Gakh, Jennifer Siegel, Carol B. Thompson & Daniel J. Barnett (2014). The Public Health Workforce and Willingness to Respond to Emergencies: A 50‐State Analysis of Potentially Influential Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (1):64-71.
    Law plays a critical role in all stages of a public health emergency, providing an infrastructure for planning, response, and recovery efforts. A growing body of research has underscored the potential for certain types of state laws, such as those granting liability protections to responders, to influence the public health workforce's participation in emergency responses. It is therefore especially important to focus on particular state-level laws that may be associated with individuals' increased or decreased (...)
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  2.  12
    Susan M. Allan, Benjamin Mason Meier, Joan Miles, Gregg Underheim & Anne C. Haddix (2007). Why and How States Are Updating Their Public Health Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (s4):39-42.
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  3. Susan M. Allan, Benjamin Mason Meier, Joan Miles, Gregg Underheim & Anne C. Haddix (2007). Why and How States Are Updating Their Public Health Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:39-42.
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  4. Scott C. Burris & Evan D. Anderson (2011). Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health: The Work of the Public Health Law Research National Program Office. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39:15-20.
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  5. Jean O'Connor, Paul Jarris, Richard Vogt & Heather Horton (2011). Public Health Preparedness Laws and Policies: Where Do We Go After Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39:51-55.
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  6.  2
    Andrea M. Garcia (2013). State Laws Regulating Prescribing of Controlled Substances: Balancing the Public Health Problems of Chronic Pain and Prescription Painkiller Abuse and Overdose. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41:42-45.
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  7.  10
    Scott C. Burris & Evan D. Anderson (2011). Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health: The Work of the Public Health Law Research National Program Office. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (s1):15-20.
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  8.  3
    Elva Yañez, Gary Cox, Mike Cooney & Robert Eadie (2003). Preemption in Public Health: The Dynamics of Clean Indoor Air Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 31 (s4):84-85.
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  9.  2
    Robert M. Pestronk, Brian Kamoie, David Fidler, Gene Matthews, Georges C. Benjamin, Ralph T. Bryan, Socrates H. Tuch, Richard Gottfried, Jonathan E. Fielding, Fran Schmitz & Stephen Redd (2008). Improving Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (s1):47-51.
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  10.  4
    Brian Kamoie, Robert M. Pestronk, Peter Baldridge, David Fidler, Leah Devlin, George A. Mensah & Michael Doney (2008). Assessing Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (s1):23-27.
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  11.  1
    Jean O'Connor, Paul Jarris, Richard Vogt & Heather Horton (2011). Public Health Preparedness Laws and Policies: Where Do We Go After Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (s1):51-55.
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  12. Brian Kamoie, Robert M. Pestronk, Peter Baldridge, David Fidler, Leah Devlin, George A. Mensah & Michael Doney (2008). Assessing Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):23-27.
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  13. Robert M. Pestronk, Brian Kamoie, David Fidler, Gene Matthews, Georges C. Benjamin, Ralph T. Bryan, Socrates H. Tuch, Richard Gottfried, Jonathan E. Fielding, Fran Schmitz & Stephen Redd (2008). Improving Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):47-51.
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  14. Victor Richardson, Sallie Milam & Denise Chrysler (2015). Is Sharing De-Identified Data Legal? The State of Public Health Confidentiality Laws and Their Interplay with Statistical Disclosure Limitation Techniques. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (s1):83-86.
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  15. Lainie Rutkow, Jon S. Vernick, Maxim Gakh, Jennifer Siegel, Carol B. Thompson & Daniel J. Barnett (2014). The Public Health Workforce and Willingness to Respond to Emergencies: A 50-State Analysis of Potentially Influential Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):64-71.
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  16. Elva Yañez, Gary Cox, Mike Cooney & Robert Eadie (2003). Preemption in Public Health: The Dynamics of Clean Indoor Air Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):84-85.
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  17.  30
    Sabina Gainotti, Nicola Moran, Carlo Petrini & Darren Shickle (2008). Ethical Models Underpinning Responses to Threats to Public Health: A Comparison of Approaches to Communicable Disease Control in Europe. Bioethics 22 (9):466-476.
    Increases in international travel and migratory flows have enabled infectious diseases to emerge and spread more rapidly than ever before. Hence, it is increasingly easy for local infectious diseases to become global infectious diseases (GIDs). National governments must be able to react quickly and effectively to GIDs, whether naturally occurring or intentionally instigated by bioterrorism. According to the World Health Organisation, global partnerships are necessary to gather the most up-to-date information and to mobilize resources to tackle GIDs when necessary. (...)
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  18.  23
    Lawrence O. Gostin (2001). Health Information: Reconciling Personal Privacy with the Public Good of Human Health. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (3):321-335.
    The success of the health care system depends on the accuracy, correctness and trustworthiness of the information, and the privacy rights of individuals to control the disclosure of personal information. A national policy on health informational privacy should be guided by ethical principles that respect individual autonomy while recognizing the important collective interests in the use of health information. At present there are no adequate laws or constitutional principles to help guide a rational privacy policy. The (...)
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  19.  1
    Patrick O'Byrne, Alyssa Bryan & Marie Roy (2013). HIV Criminal Prosecutions and Public Health: An Examination of the Empirical Research. Medical Humanities 39 (2):85-90.
    Objectives To review the extant literature on HIV criminal laws, and to determine the impact of these laws on public health practice.Methods The available research on this topic was obtained and reviewed.Results The extant literature addressed three main topics: people's awareness of HIV criminal laws; people's perceptions of HIV criminal laws; and the potential effects of HIV criminal laws on people's sexual, HIV-status disclosure and healthcare-seeking practices. Within these categories, the literature demonstrated a (...)
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  20.  1
    James G. Hodge, Lawrence O. Gostin, Kristine Gebbie & Deborah L. Erickson (2006). Transforming Public Health Law: The Turning Point Model State Public Health Act. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (1):77-84.
    Law is an essential tool for improving public health infrastructure and outcomes; however, existing state statutory public health laws may be insufficient. Built over decades in response to various diseases/conditions, public health laws are antiquated, divergent, and confusing. The Turning Point Public Health Statute Modernization National Collaborative addressed the need for public health law reform by producing a comprehensive model state act. The Act provides scientifically, ethically, and legally (...)
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  21.  3
    Diane E. Hoffmann & Virginia Rowthorn (2008). Building Public Health Law Capacity at the Local Level. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (s3):6-28.
    Local health officials are called upon every day to implement the programs, enforce the regulations, and take the actions that protect the health of the citizens in their districts. These responsibilities and duties are created and regulated by a complex interplay of federal, state, and local law. Not only is an understanding of these laws necessary to carry out public health activities on a daily basis, but many public health scholars and practitioners also (...)
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  22.  7
    Dhrubajyoti Bhattacharya (2007). An Exploration of Conceptual and Temporal Fallacies in International Health Law and Promotion of Global Public Health Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (4):588-598.
    In February 2007, Indonesia withheld sharing H5N1 viral samples in order to compel the World Health Organization and Member States to guarantee future access to vaccines for States disproportionately burdened by infectious diseases. This article explores conceptual and temporal fallacies in the International Health Regulations and the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, as relates to global public health preparedness. Recommendations include adopting laws to facilitate non-pharmaceutical interventions; securing the rights (...)
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  23.  12
    Jennifer S. Bard (2011). When Public Health and Genetic Privacy Collide: Positive and Normative Theories Explaining How ACA's Expansion of Corporate Wellness Programs Conflicts with GINA's Privacy Rules. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (3):469-487.
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) contains many provisions intended to increase access to and lower the cost of health care by adopting public health measures. One of these promotes the use of at-work wellness programs by both providing employers with grants to develop these programs and also increasing their ability to tie the price employees pay for health insurance for participating in these programs and meeting specific health goals. Yet despite (...)
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  24. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and (...)
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  25. Gregg D. Caruso (2016). Free Will Skepticism and Criminal Behavior: A Public Health-Quarantine Model. Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (1):25-48.
    One of the most frequently voiced criticisms of free will skepticism is that it is unable to adequately deal with criminal behavior and that the responses it would permit as justified are insufficient for acceptable social policy. This concern is fueled by two factors. The first is that one of the most prominent justifications for punishing criminals, retributivism, is incompatible with free will skepticism. The second concern is that alternative justifications that are not ruled out by the skeptical view per (...)
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  26. Madison Powers, Ruth Faden & Yashar Saghai (2012). Liberty, Mill and the Framework of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):6-15.
    In this article, we address the relevance of J.S. Mill’s political philosophy for a framework of public health ethics. In contrast to some readings of Mill, we reject the view that in the formulation of public policies liberties of all kinds enjoy an equal presumption in their favor. We argue that Mill also rejects this view and discuss the distinction that Mill makes between three kinds of liberty interests: interests that are immune from state interference; interests that (...)
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  27. Jonny Anomaly (2011). Public Health and Public Goods. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.
    It has become increasingly difficult to distinguish public health from tangentially related fields like social work. I argue that we should reclaim the more traditional conception of public health as the provision of health-related public goods. The public goods account has the advantage of establishing a relatively clear and distinctive mission for public health. It also allows a consensus of people with different comprehensive moral and political commitments to endorse public (...)
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  28. Giovanni De Grandis (2016). Practical Integration: The Art of Balancing Values, Institutions and Knowledge. Lessons From the History of British Public Health and Town Planning. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 56:92-105.
    The paper uses two historical examples, public health (1840-1880) and town planning (1945-1975) in Britain, to analyse the challenges faced by goal-driven research, an increasingly important trend in science policy, as exemplified by the prominence of calls for addressing Grand Challenges. Two key points are argued. (1) Given that the aim of research addressing social or global problems is to contribute to improving things, this research should include all the steps necessary to bring science and technology to fruition. (...)
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  29.  5
    Kathryn L. MacKay (2015). The Restaurant Food Hot Potato: Stop Passing It on—A Commentary on Mah and Timming’s, ‘Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level’. Public Health Ethics 8 (1):90-93.
    In the case discussion, ‘Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level’ , Mah and Timming state that menu labelling would ‘place requirements for information disclosure on private sector food businesses, which, as a policy instrument, is arguably less intrusive than related activities such as requiring changes to the food content’. In this commentary on Mah and Timming’s case study, I focus on discussing how menu-labelling policy permits governments to avoid addressing (...)
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  30.  1
    P. E. Griffiths & C. West (2015). A Balanced Intervention Ladder: Promoting Autonomy Through Public Health Action. Public Health 129 (8):1092--1098.
    The widely cited Nuffield Council on Bioethics ‘Intervention Ladder’ structurally embodies the assumption that personal autonomy is maximized by non-intervention. Consequently, the Intervention Ladder encourages an extreme ‘negative liberty’ view of autonomy. Yet there are several alternative accounts of autonomy that are both arguably superior as accounts of autonomy and better suited to the issues facing public health ethics. We propose to replace the one-sided ladder, which has any intervention coming at a cost to autonomy, with a two-sided (...)
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  31.  2
    Muireann Quigley & John Harris (2008). Personal or Public Health? In Michael Boylan (ed.), International Public Health Policy & Ethics. Dordrecht 15--29.
    Intuitively we feel that we ought (to attempt) to save the lives, or ameliorate the suffering, of identifiable individuals where we can. But this comes at a price. It means that there may not be any resources to save the lives of others in similar situations in the future. Or worse, there may not be enough resources left to prevent others from ending up in similar situations in the future. This chapter asks whether this is justifiable or whether we would (...)
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  32. Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (eds.) (2007). Ethics, Prevention, and Public Health. OUP Oxford.
    In these twelve papers notable ethicists use the resources of ethical theory to illuminate important theoretical and practical topics, including the nature of public health, notions of community, population bioethics, the legitimate role of law, the use of cost-effectiveness as a methodology, vaccinations, and the nature of infectious disease.
     
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  33.  14
    Per-Anders Tengland (2010). Health Promotion or Disease Prevention: A Real Difference for Public Health Practice? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):203-221.
    It appears that there are two distinct practices within public health, namely health promotion and disease prevention, leading to different goals. But does the distinction hold? Can we promote health without preventing disease, and vice versa? The aim of the paper is to answer these questions. First, the central concepts are defined and the logical relations between them are spelt out. A preliminary conclusion is that there is a logical difference between health and disease, which (...)
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  34.  45
    Federica Russo (2012). Public Health Policy, Evidence, and Causation: Lessons From the Studies on Obesity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):141-151.
    The paper addresses the question of how different types of evidence ought to inform public health policy. By analysing case studies on obesity, the paper draws lessons about the different roles that different types of evidence play in setting up public health policies. More specifically, it is argued that evidence of difference-making supports considerations about ‘what works for whom in what circumstances’, and that evidence of mechanisms provides information about the ‘causal pathways’ to intervene upon.
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  35.  14
    Kalle Grill & Angus Dawson (forthcoming). Ethical Frameworks in Public Health Decision-Making: Defending a Value-Based and Pluralist Approach. Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    A number of ethical frameworks have been proposed to support decision-making in public health and the evaluation of public health policy and practice. This is encouraging, since ethical considerations are of paramount importance in health policy. However, these frameworks have various deficiencies, in part because they incorporate substantial ethical positions. In this article, we discuss and criticise a framework developed by James Childress and Ruth Bernheim, which we consider to be the state of the art (...)
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  36.  6
    John E. Ataguba & Gavin Mooney (2011). A Communitarian Approach to Public Health. Health Care Analysis 19 (2):154-164.
    This paper argues that there is a need to move yet further than has already been suggested by some from the individual to the collective as a base for public health. A communitarian approach is one way to achieve this. This has the advantage of allowing not only the community’s voice to have a say in setting the values for public health but also more formally the development of a constitution on which public health (...)
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  37.  12
    Shawn H. E. Harmon (2009). International Public Health Law: Not so Much WHO as Why, and Not Enough WHO and Why Not? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):245-255.
    To state the obvious, “health matters”, but health (or its equitable enjoyment) is neither simple nor easy. Public health in particular, which encompasses a broad collection of complex and multidisciplinary activities which are critical to the wellbeing and security of individuals, populations and nations, is a difficult milieu to master effectively. In fact, despite the vital importance of public health, there is a relative dearth of ethico-legal norms tailored for, and directed at, the (...) health sector, particularly at the international level. This is a state of affairs which is no longer tenable in the global environment. This article argues that public health promotion is a moral duty, and that international actors are key stakeholders upon whom this duty falls. In particular, the World Health Organization bears a heavy responsibility in this regard. The article claims that better health can and must be better promoted through a more robust interpretation of the WHO’s role, arguing that neither the WHO nor international law have yet played their necessary part in promoting health for all. (shrink)
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  38.  3
    David Badcott (2011). Professional Values in Community and Public Health Pharmacy. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):187-194.
    General practice (community) pharmacy as a healthcare profession is largely devoted to therapeutic treatment of individual patients whether in dispensing medically authorised prescriptions or by providing members of the public with over-the-counter advice and service for a variety of common ailments. Recently, community pharmacy has been identified as an untapped resource available to undertake important aspects of public health and in particular health promotion. In contrast to therapeutic treatment, public health primarily concerns the (...) of the entire population, rather than the health of individuals (Childress et al. in J Law Med Ethics 30:170–178, 2002). Thus, an important question for the profession is whether those moral and professional values that are appropriate to the therapeutic care of individual patients are relevant and adequate to support the additional public health role. (shrink)
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  39.  16
    Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether (...)
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  40.  16
    David B. Resnik (2015). Food and Beverage Policies and Public Health Ethics. Health Care Analysis 23 (2):122-133.
    Government food and beverage policies can play an important role in promoting public health. Few people would question this assumption. Difficult questions can arise, however, when policymakers, public health officials, citizens, and businesses deliberate about food and beverage policies, because competing values may be at stake, such as public health, individual autonomy, personal responsibility, economic prosperity, and fairness. An ethically justified policy strikes a reasonable among competing values by meeting the following criteria: the policy (...)
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  41.  2
    Michèle St-Pierre, Daniel Reinharz & Jacques-Bernard Gauthier (2006). Organizing the Public Health-Clinical Health Interface: Theoretical Bases. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):97-106.
    This article addresses the issue of the interface between public health and clinical health within the context of the search for networking approaches geared to a more integrated delivery of health services. The articulation of an operative interface is complicated by the fact that the definition of networking modalities involves complex intra- and interdisciplinary and intra- and interorganizational systems across which a new transversal dynamics of intervention practices and exchanges between service structures must be established. A (...)
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  42.  4
    Rick Mayes & Blair Armistead (2013). Chronic Disease, Prevention Policy, and the Future of Public Health and Primary Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):691-697.
    Globally, chronic disease and conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Why, then, are public health efforts and programs aimed at preventing chronic disease so difficult to implement and maintain? Also, why is primary care—the key medical specialty for helping persons with chronic disease manage their illnesses—in decline? Public health suffers from its often being socially controversial, personally intrusive, irritating to many powerful corporate interests, and structurally (...)
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  43.  25
    Lenny R. Vartanian & Joshua M. Smyth (2013). Primum Non Nocere: Obesity Stigma and Public Health. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):49-57.
    Several recent anti-obesity campaigns appear to embrace stigmatization of obese individuals as a public health strategy. These approaches seem to be based on the fundamental assumptions that (1) obesity is largely under an individual’s control and (2) stigmatizing obese individuals will motivate them to change their behavior and will also result in successful behavior change. The empirical evidence does not support these assumptions: Although body weight is, to some degree, under individuals’ personal control, there are a range of (...)
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  44.  12
    Ross Upshur (2013). What Does Public Health Ethics Tell (Or Not Tell) Us About Intervening in Non-Communicable Diseases? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):19-28.
    Obesity has been described as pandemic and a public health crisis. It has been argued that concerted research efforts are needed to enhance our understanding and develop effective interventions for the complex and multiple dimensions of the health challenges posed by obesity. This would provide a secure evidence base in order to justify clinical interventions and public policy. This paper critically examines these claims through the examination of models of public health and public (...)
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  45.  42
    Meena Krishnamurthy (2013). Political Solidarity, Justice and Public Health. Public Health Ethics 6 (2):129-141.
    n this paper, I argue that political solidarity is important to justice. At its core, political solidarity is a relational concept. To be in a relation of political solidarity, is to be in a relation of connection or unity with one’s fellow citizens. I argue that fellow citizens can be said to stand in such a relation when they have attitudes of collective identification, mutual respect, mutual trust, and mutual support and loyalty toward one another. I argue that political solidarity, (...)
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  46.  11
    Melanie Rock & Chris Degeling (2013). Public Health Ethics and a Status for Pets as Person-Things. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):485-495.
    Within the field of medical ethics, discussions related to public health have mainly concentrated on issues that are closely tied to research and practice involving technologies and professional services, including vaccination, screening, and insurance coverage. Broader determinants of population health have received less attention, although this situation is rapidly changing. Against this backdrop, our specific contribution to the literature on ethics and law vis-à-vis promoting population health is to open up the ubiquitous presence of pets within (...)
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  47.  17
    Andrew Courtwright (2013). Stigmatization and Public Health Ethics. Bioethics 27 (2):74-80.
    Encouraged by the success of smoking denormalization strategies as a tobacco-control measure, public health institutions are adopting a similar approach to other health behaviors. For example, a recent controversial ad campaign in New York explicitly aimed to denormalize HIV/AIDS amongst gay men. Authors such as Scott Burris have argued that efforts like this are tantamount to stigmatization and that such stigmatization is unethical because it is dehumanizing. Others have offered a limited endorsement of denormalization/stigmatization campaigns as being (...)
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  48.  8
    Stephen Wilkinson (2015). Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health. Bioethics 29 (1):26-35.
    One widely held view of prenatal screening is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. The Pure Choice view, if followed through (...)
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  49.  29
    Søren Holm (2009). Should Persons Detained During Public Health Crises Receive Compensation? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):197-205.
    One of the ways in which public health officials control outbreaks of epidemic disease is by attempting to control the situations in which the infectious agent can spread. This may include isolation of infected persons, quarantine of persons who may be infected and detention of persons who are present in or have entered premises where infected persons are being treated. Most who have analysed such measures think that the restrictions in liberty they entail and the detriments in welfare (...)
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  50.  21
    Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge (2013). Towards a Smart Population: A Public Health Framework for Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 6 (2):419-427.
    This paper presents a novel view of the concept of cognitive enhancement by taking a population health perspective. We propose four main modifiable healthy lifestyle factors for optimal cognitive functioning across the population for which there is evidence of safety and efficacy. These include i) promoting adequate sleep, ii) increasing physical activity, iii) encouraging a healthy diet, including minimising consumption of stimulants, alcohol and other drugs including nicotine, iv) and promoting good mental health. We argue that it is (...)
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