Search results for 'Public health laws' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lainie Rutkow, Jon S. Vernick, Maxim Gakh, Jennifer Siegel, Carol B. Thompson & Daniel J. Barnett (2014). The Public Health Workforce and Willingness to Respond to Emergencies: A 50‐State Analysis of Potentially Influential Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):64-71.score: 351.0
    Law plays a critical role in all stages of a public health emergency, providing an infrastructure for planning, response, and recovery efforts. A growing body of research has underscored the potential for certain types of state laws, such as those granting liability protections to responders, to influence the public health workforce's participation in emergency responses. It is therefore especially important to focus on particular state-level laws that may be associated with individuals' increased or decreased (...)
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  2. Sabina Gainotti, Nicola Moran, Carlo Petrini & Darren Shickle (2008). Ethical Models Underpinning Responses to Threats to Public Health: A Comparison of Approaches to Communicable Disease Control in Europe. Bioethics 22 (9):466-476.score: 332.0
    Increases in international travel and migratory flows have enabled infectious diseases to emerge and spread more rapidly than ever before. Hence, it is increasingly easy for local infectious diseases to become global infectious diseases (GIDs). National governments must be able to react quickly and effectively to GIDs, whether naturally occurring or intentionally instigated by bioterrorism. According to the World Health Organisation, global partnerships are necessary to gather the most up-to-date information and to mobilize resources to tackle GIDs when necessary. (...)
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  3. Shawn H. E. Harmon (2009). International Public Health Law: Not so Much WHO as Why, and Not Enough WHO and Why Not? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):245-255.score: 296.0
    To state the obvious, “health matters”, but health (or its equitable enjoyment) is neither simple nor easy. Public health in particular, which encompasses a broad collection of complex and multidisciplinary activities which are critical to the wellbeing and security of individuals, populations and nations, is a difficult milieu to master effectively. In fact, despite the vital importance of public health, there is a relative dearth of ethico-legal norms tailored for, and directed at, the (...) health sector, particularly at the international level. This is a state of affairs which is no longer tenable in the global environment. This article argues that public health promotion is a moral duty, and that international actors are key stakeholders upon whom this duty falls. In particular, the World Health Organization bears a heavy responsibility in this regard. The article claims that better health can and must be better promoted through a more robust interpretation of the WHO’s role, arguing that neither the WHO nor international law have yet played their necessary part in promoting health for all. (shrink)
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  4. Lawrence O. Gostin (2001). Health Information: Reconciling Personal Privacy with the Public Good of Human Health. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (3):321-335.score: 289.0
    The success of the health care system depends on the accuracy, correctness and trustworthiness of the information, and the privacy rights of individuals to control the disclosure of personal information. A national policy on health informational privacy should be guided by ethical principles that respect individual autonomy while recognizing the important collective interests in the use of health information. At present there are no adequate laws or constitutional principles to help guide a rational privacy policy. The (...)
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  5. Susan M. Allan, Benjamin Mason Meier, Joan Miles, Gregg Underheim & Anne C. Haddix (2007). Why and How States Are Updating Their Public Health Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:39-42.score: 273.0
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  6. Scott C. Burris & Evan D. Anderson (2011). Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health: The Work of the Public Health Law Research National Program Office. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):15-20.score: 267.0
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  7. Brian Kamoie, Robert M. Pestronk, Peter Baldridge, David Fidler, Leah Devlin, George A. Mensah & Michael Doney (2008). Assessing Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):23-27.score: 264.0
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  8. Elva Yañez, Gary Cox, Mike Cooney & Robert Eadie (2003). Preemption in Public Health: The Dynamics of Clean Indoor Air Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):84-85.score: 264.0
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  9. Jean O'Connor, Paul Jarris, Richard Vogt & Heather Horton (2011). Public Health Preparedness Laws and Policies: Where Do We Go After Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39:51-55.score: 264.0
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  10. Robert M. Pestronk, Brian Kamoie, David Fidler, Gene Matthews, Georges C. Benjamin, Ralph T. Bryan, Socrates H. Tuch, Richard Gottfried, Jonathan E. Fielding, Fran Schmitz & Stephen Redd (2008). Improving Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):47-51.score: 264.0
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  11. Paula Lobato de Faria (ed.) (2006). The Role of Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights to Promote a Safer and Healthier World. Fundação Luso-Americana.score: 240.0
  12. André den Exter (ed.) (2011). International Health Law and Ethics: Basic Documents. Maklu ;.score: 240.0
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  13. Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney (forthcoming). Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.score: 238.0
    It is now 10 years since the disease we now know as SARS—severe acute respiratory syndrome—caused more than 700 deaths around the world and made more than 8,000 people ill. More recently, in 2009 the global community experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century—the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This paper analyses the major developments in international public health law relating to infectious diseases in the period since SARS and considers their implications for pandemic planning.
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  14. David Badcott (2011). Professional Values in Community and Public Health Pharmacy. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):187-194.score: 218.0
    General practice (community) pharmacy as a healthcare profession is largely devoted to therapeutic treatment of individual patients whether in dispensing medically authorised prescriptions or by providing members of the public with over-the-counter advice and service for a variety of common ailments. Recently, community pharmacy has been identified as an untapped resource available to undertake important aspects of public health and in particular health promotion. In contrast to therapeutic treatment, public health primarily concerns the (...) of the entire population, rather than the health of individuals (Childress et al. in J Law Med Ethics 30:170–178, 2002). Thus, an important question for the profession is whether those moral and professional values that are appropriate to the therapeutic care of individual patients are relevant and adequate to support the additional public health role. (shrink)
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  15. Jennifer S. Bard (2011). When Public Health and Genetic Privacy Collide: Positive and Normative Theories Explaining How ACA's Expansion of Corporate Wellness Programs Conflicts with GINA's Privacy Rules. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):469-487.score: 216.0
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) contains many provisions intended to increase access to and lower the cost of health care by adopting public health measures. One of these promotes the use of at-work wellness programs by both providing employers with grants to develop these programs and also increasing their ability to tie the price employees pay for health insurance for participating in these programs and meeting specific health goals. Yet despite (...)
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  16. Robin Mackenzie (2011). The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure. Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.score: 211.0
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health (...)
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  17. Yashar Saghai (2012). The Ethics of Public Health Nudges. Dissertation, Georgetown Universityscore: 211.0
    There is growing interest in using non-coercive interventions to promote and protect public health, in particular "health nudges." Behavioral economist Richard Thaler and law scholar Cass Sunstein coined the term nudge to designate influences that steer individuals in a predetermined direction by activating their automatic cognitive processes, while preserving their freedom of choice. Proponents of nudges argue that public and private institutions are entitled to use health-promoting nudges because nudges do not close off any options. (...)
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  18. Melanie Rock & Chris Degeling (2013). Public Health Ethics and a Status for Pets as Person-Things. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):485-495.score: 211.0
    Within the field of medical ethics, discussions related to public health have mainly concentrated on issues that are closely tied to research and practice involving technologies and professional services, including vaccination, screening, and insurance coverage. Broader determinants of population health have received less attention, although this situation is rapidly changing. Against this backdrop, our specific contribution to the literature on ethics and law vis-à-vis promoting population health is to open up the ubiquitous presence of pets within (...)
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  19. Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (eds.) (2009). Ethics, Prevention, and Public Health. OUP Oxford.score: 211.0
    Public health is an important and fast-developing area of ethical discussion. In this volume a range of issues in public health ethics are explored using the resources of moral theory, political philosophy, philosophy of science, applied ethics, law, and economics. The twelve original papers presented consider numerous ethical issues arise within public health ethics. To what extent can the public good or the public interest justify state interventions that impose limits upon the (...)
     
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  20. James G. Hodge, Leila Barraza, Jennifer Bernstein, Courtney Chu, Veda Collmer, Corey Davis, Megan M. Griest, Monica S. Hammer, Jill Krueger, Kerri McGowan Lowrey & Daniel G. Orenstein (2013). Major Trends in Public Health Law and Practice: A Network National Report. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):737-745.score: 197.7
    Since its inception in September 2010, the Network for Public Health Law has responded to hundreds of public health legal technical assistance claims from around the country. Based on a review of these data, a series of major trends in public health practice and the law are analyzed, including issues concerning: the Affordable Care Act, tobacco control, emergency legal preparedness, health information privacy, food policy, vaccination, drug overdose prevention, sports injury law, public (...)
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  21. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.score: 196.0
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and (...)
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  22. Jonny Anomaly (2011). Public Health and Public Goods. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.score: 196.0
    It has become increasingly difficult to distinguish public health (and public health ethics) from tangentially related fields like social work. I argue that we should reclaim the more traditional conception of public health as the provision of health-related public goods. The public goods account has the advantage of establishing a relatively clear and distinctive mission for public health. It also allows a consensus of people with different comprehensive moral and (...)
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  23. Madison Powers, Ruth Faden & Yashar Saghai (2012). Liberty, Mill and the Framework of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):6-15.score: 196.0
    In this article, we address the relevance of J.S. Mill’s political philosophy for a framework of public health ethics. In contrast to some readings of Mill, we reject the view that in the formulation of public policies liberties of all kinds enjoy an equal presumption in their favor. We argue that Mill also rejects this view and discuss the distinction that Mill makes between three kinds of liberty interests: interests that are immune from state interference; interests that (...)
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  24. Chester R. Burns (ed.) (1977). Legacies in Law and Medicine. Science History Publications.score: 189.0
     
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  25. Elizabeth Palmer (2002). Should Public Health Be a Private Concern? Developing a Public Service Paradigm in English Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (4):663-686.score: 186.0
    This article explores the tension between the fundamental perception that the provision of privatized services such as health and social care remain inherently public and the absence of any clearly developed juridical concept of ‘public services’ as the basis of judicial control in accordance with public law standards. In a series of recent cases, courts have had the opportunity to determine whether private contractors engaged in the provision of local authority residential and social care services are (...)
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  26. James G. Hodge, Veda Collmer, Daniel G. Orenstein, Chase Millea & Laura Van Buren (2013). Reconsidering the Legality of Cigarette Smoking Advertisements on Television Public Health and the Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):369-373.score: 183.0
    Television advertisements depicting the use of electronic cigarettes have recently exposed minors to images of smoking behaviors. While these advertisements are currently legal, existing laws should be interpreted or expanded to ban the commercial depiction of smoking behaviors with any product that resembles a cigarette to shield minors from potentially influential advertising.
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  27. Wendy E. Parmet (2011). The Individual Mandate: Implications for Public Health Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):401-413.score: 181.7
    No provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) has been more contentious than the so-called “individual mandate,” the constitutionality of which is now before several appellate courts. Critics claim that the mandate represents an unprecedented attempt by the federal government to compel individual action. Yet, states frequently employ similar mandates to protect the public's health. These public health mandates have also often aroused deep opposition. This essay situates PPACA's mandate, and the opposition to (...)
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  28. David Larios Risco & Fernando Abellán-García Sánchez (eds.) (2009). Error Sanitario y Seguridad de Pacientes: Bases Jurídicas Para Un Registro de Sucesos Adversos En El Sistema Nacional de Salud. Comares.score: 180.0
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  29. J. -F. Menard (2010). A 'Nudge' for Public Health Ethics: Libertarian Paternalism as a Framework for Ethical Analysis of Public Health Interventions? Public Health Ethics 3 (3):229-238.score: 178.3
    Is it possible to interfere with individual decision-making while preserving freedom of choice? The purpose of this article is to assess whether ‘libertarian paternalism’, a set of political and ethical principles derived from the observations of behavioural sciences, can form the basis of a viable framework for the ethical analysis of public health interventions. First, the article situates libertarian libertarianism within the broader context of the law and economics movement. The main tenets of the approach are then presented (...)
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  30. Mark A. Rothstein (2009). The Limits of Public Health: A Response. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):84-88.score: 178.3
    Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 501 East Broadway # 310, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, USA. Tel.: 502 852 4980; Fax: 502 852 4963; Email: mark.rothstein{at}louisville.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract In his article in this issue, Daniel Goldberg advocates a broad definition of public health and expressly rejects the narrow definition of public (...) I proposed in a 2002 article. Goldberg asserts that public health should include all of the root causes of ill health in populations. Such a definition, however, would include within public health war, famine, crime, illiteracy and numerous other conditions on which public health professionals and agencies lack the resources, expertise and public support to act. The appropriate definition explicitly recognizes that public health is a legal term of art referring to specifically authorized activities by public officials to protect, promote and improve population health. CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  31. R. Pierce (2011). The Expressive Function of Public Health Policy: The Case of Pandemic Planning. Public Health Ethics 4 (1):53-62.score: 178.3
    Many legal scholars well recognize that, in some instances, support for a law or policy may be primarily because of its expressive function, i.e. the statements it makes about underlying values. In these cases, the expressive content of a law or policy may actually overshadow its central purpose. Examples of this phenomenon, according to Cass Sunstein, include, for example, regulations against hate speech in the USA. He suggests that achieving the consequence (prohibiting hateful speech against certain groups) may not be (...)
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  32. J. C. Thomas (forthcoming). Law and Ethics in Public Health. North Carolina Institute of Public Health. Public Health Ethics. Available At: Http://Www2. Sph. Unc. Edu/Oce/Phethics/Module4/Index. Htm. Accessed Apr.score: 175.7
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  33. Federica Russo (2012). Public Health Policy, Evidence, and Causation: Lessons From the Studies on Obesity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):141-151.score: 174.0
    The paper addresses the question of how different types of evidence ought to inform public health policy. By analysing case studies on obesity, the paper draws lessons about the different roles that different types of evidence play in setting up public health policies. More specifically, it is argued that evidence of difference-making supports considerations about ‘what works for whom in what circumstances’, and that evidence of mechanisms provides information about the ‘causal pathways’ to intervene upon.
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  34. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 174.0
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether (...)
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  35. David B. Resnik (forthcoming). Food and Beverage Policies and Public Health Ethics. Health Care Analysis:1-12.score: 174.0
    Government food and beverage policies can play an important role in promoting public health. Few people would question this assumption. Difficult questions can arise, however, when policymakers, public health officials, citizens, and businesses deliberate about food and beverage policies, because competing values may be at stake, such as public health, individual autonomy, personal responsibility, economic prosperity, and fairness. An ethically justified policy strikes a reasonable among competing values by meeting the following criteria: (1) the (...)
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  36. John E. Ataguba & Gavin Mooney (2011). A Communitarian Approach to Public Health. Health Care Analysis 19 (2):154-164.score: 174.0
    This paper argues that there is a need to move yet further than has already been suggested by some from the individual to the collective as a base for public health. A communitarian approach is one way to achieve this. This has the advantage of allowing not only the community’s voice to have a say in setting the values for public health but also more formally the development of a constitution on which public health (...)
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  37. Rick Mayes & Blair Armistead (2013). Chronic Disease, Prevention Policy, and the Future of Public Health and Primary Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):691-697.score: 174.0
    Globally, chronic disease and conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Why, then, are public health efforts and programs aimed at preventing chronic disease so difficult to implement and maintain? Also, why is primary care—the key medical specialty for helping persons with chronic disease manage their illnesses—in decline? Public health suffers from its often being socially controversial, personally intrusive, irritating to many powerful corporate interests, and structurally (...)
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  38. Michèle St-Pierre, Daniel Reinharz & Jacques-Bernard Gauthier (2006). Organizing the Public Health-Clinical Health Interface: Theoretical Bases. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):97-106.score: 174.0
    This article addresses the issue of the interface between public health and clinical health within the context of the search for networking approaches geared to a more integrated delivery of health services. The articulation of an operative interface is complicated by the fact that the definition of networking modalities involves complex intra- and interdisciplinary and intra- and interorganizational systems across which a new transversal dynamics of intervention practices and exchanges between service structures must be established. A (...)
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  39. Per-Anders Tengland (2010). Health Promotion or Disease Prevention: A Real Difference for Public Health Practice? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):203-221.score: 174.0
    It appears that there are two distinct practices within public health, namely health promotion and disease prevention, leading to different goals. But does the distinction hold? Can we promote health without preventing disease, and vice versa? The aim of the paper is to answer these questions. First, the central concepts are defined and the logical relations between them are spelt out. A preliminary conclusion is that there is a logical difference between health and disease, which (...)
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  40. Craig Blinderman (2009). Palliative Care, Public Health and Justice: Setting Priorities in Resource Poor Countries. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):105-110.score: 168.0
    Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients requiring terminal (...)
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  41. Louise Cummings (2012). Scaring the Public: Fear Appeal Arguments in Public Health Reasoning. Informal Logic 32 (1):25-50.score: 168.0
    The study of threat and fear appeal arguments has given rise to a sizeable literature. Even within a public health context, much is now known about how these arguments work to gain the public’s compliance with health recommendations. Notwithstanding this level of interest in, and examination of, these arguments, there is one aspect of these arguments that still remains unexplored. That aspect concerns the heuristic function of these arguments within our thinking about public health (...)
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  42. David Barling (2007). Food Supply Chain Governance and Public Health Externalities: Upstream Policy Interventions and the UK State. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):285-300.score: 168.0
    Contemporary food supply chains are generating externalities with high economic and social costs, notably in public health terms through the rise in diet-related non-communicable disease. The UK State is developing policy strategies to tackle these public health problems alongside intergovernmental responses. However, the governance of food supply chains is conducted by, and across, both private and public spheres and within a multilevel framework. The realities of contemporary food governance are that private interests are key drivers (...)
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  43. Søren Holm (2009). Should Persons Detained During Public Health Crises Receive Compensation? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):197-205.score: 168.0
    One of the ways in which public health officials control outbreaks of epidemic disease is by attempting to control the situations in which the infectious agent can spread. This may include isolation of infected persons, quarantine of persons who may be infected and detention of persons who are present in or have entered premises where infected persons are being treated. Most who have analysed such measures think that the restrictions in liberty they entail and the detriments in welfare (...)
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  44. Adam D. Moore (2010). Privacy, Public Health, and Controlling Medical Information. HEC Forum 22 (3):225-240.score: 168.0
    This paper argues that individuals do, in a sense, own or have exclusive claims to control their personal information and body parts. It begins by sketching several arguments that support presumptive claims to informational privacy, turning then to consider cases which illustrate when and how privacy may be overridden by public health concerns.
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  45. Doris Schroeder (2007). Public Health, Ethics, and Functional Foods. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):247-259.score: 168.0
    Functional foods aim to provide a positive impact on health and well-being beyond their nutritive content. As such, they are likely candidates to enhance the public health official’s tool kit. Or are they? Although a very small number of functional foods (e.g., phytosterol-enriched margarine) show such promise in improving individual health that Dutch health insurance companies reimburse their costs to consumers, one must not draw premature conclusions about functional foods as a group. A large number (...)
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  46. Andrew Courtwright (2013). Stigmatization and Public Health Ethics. Bioethics 27 (2):74-80.score: 168.0
    Encouraged by the success of smoking denormalization strategies as a tobacco-control measure, public health institutions are adopting a similar approach to other health behaviors. For example, a recent controversial ad campaign in New York explicitly aimed to denormalize HIV/AIDS amongst gay men. Authors such as Scott Burris have argued that efforts like this are tantamount to stigmatization and that such stigmatization is unethical because it is dehumanizing. Others have offered a limited endorsement of denormalization/stigmatization campaigns as being (...)
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  47. Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge (2013). Towards a Smart Population: A Public Health Framework for Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 6 (2):419-427.score: 168.0
    This paper presents a novel view of the concept of cognitive enhancement by taking a population health perspective. We propose four main modifiable healthy lifestyle factors for optimal cognitive functioning across the population for which there is evidence of safety and efficacy. These include i) promoting adequate sleep, ii) increasing physical activity, iii) encouraging a healthy diet, including minimising consumption of stimulants, alcohol and other drugs including nicotine, iv) and promoting good mental health. We argue that it is (...)
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  48. Lenny R. Vartanian & Joshua M. Smyth (2013). Primum Non Nocere: Obesity Stigma and Public Health. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):49-57.score: 168.0
    Several recent anti-obesity campaigns appear to embrace stigmatization of obese individuals as a public health strategy. These approaches seem to be based on the fundamental assumptions that (1) obesity is largely under an individual’s control and (2) stigmatizing obese individuals will motivate them to change their behavior and will also result in successful behavior change. The empirical evidence does not support these assumptions: Although body weight is, to some degree, under individuals’ personal control, there are a range of (...)
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  49. Meena Krishnamurthy (2013). Political Solidarity, Justice and Public Health. Public Health Ethics 6 (2):129-141.score: 168.0
    n this paper, I argue that political solidarity is important to justice. At its core, political solidarity is a relational concept. To be in a relation of political solidarity, is to be in a relation of connection or unity with one’s fellow citizens. I argue that fellow citizens can be said to stand in such a relation when they have attitudes of collective identification, mutual respect, mutual trust, and mutual support and loyalty toward one another. I argue that political solidarity, (...)
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  50. Cynthia Chappell & Nathan Carlin (2011). Public Health Ethics Education in a Competency-Based Curriculum: A Method of Programmatic Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):33-42.score: 168.0
    Public health ethics began to emerge in the 1990s as a development within bioethics. Public health ethics education has been implemented in schools of public health in recent years, and specific professionalism and ethics competencies were included in the Master of Public Health (MPH) competency set developed nationally and adapted by individual schools of public health around the country. The University of Texas School of Public Health approved the (...)
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