Search results for 'Publishing Advice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thom Brooks, Publishing Advice for Graduate Students.score: 174.0
    Graduate students often lack concrete advice on publishing. This essay is an attempt to fill this important gap. Advice is given on how to publish everything from book reviews to articles, replies to book chapters, and how to secure both edited book contracts and authored monograph contracts, along with plenty of helpful tips and advice on the publishing world (and how it works) along the way in what is meant to be a comprehensive, concrete guide (...)
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  2. Thom Brooks (2012). The Academic Journal Editor: Secrets Revealed. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (3):313-325.score: 90.0
    Academic publishing is a world filled with more mystery than revelation. Often the best advice is made available only to those lucky enough to hear it by word of mouth. This is no less true with editing academic journals. I have enjoyed the honour of launching the Journal of Moral Philosophy and serving as its editor for the last ten years. I actively sought out the best advice on a number of issues from editors serving on leading (...)
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  3. Marco Ruffino (2013). Some Remarks About Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra´s Advice on the Language of Philosophy. Crítica: Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofía 45 (133):99-105.score: 42.0
    n this paper I discuss Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra�s notes on the proper language for publishing texts in analytic philosophy. I am basically in agreement with him on the practical side, i.e., publishing in English increases the chances of philosophical exchange with other communities. I disagree, however, if one wants to read a stronger �should� in his advice, for there is nothing in the essence of analytic philosophy that ties it to the English language. Finally, I end with a (...)
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  4. M. B. Weyden (2007). The ICMJE and URM: Providing Independent Advice for the Conduct of Biomedical Research and Publication. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):15.score: 42.0
    _The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is a working group of editors of selected medical journals that meets annually. Founded in Vancouver, Canada, in 1978, it currently consists of 11 member journals and a representative of the US National Library of Medicine. The major purpose of the Committee is to address and provide guidance for the conduct and publishing of biomedical research and the ethical tenets underpinning these activities. This advice is detailed in the Committee's _ (...)
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  5. Anthony Haynes (2012). Writing for Peer Reviewed Journals: Strategies for Getting Published. By Pat Thomson and Barbara Kamler: Pp 190+ 10. Abingdon: Routledge. 2013.£ 90 (Hbk),£ 22.99 (Pbk). ISBN 9780415809306 (Hbk), 9780415809313 (Pbk). [REVIEW] British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (4):452-452.score: 30.0
    It's not easy getting published, but everyone has to do it. Writing for Peer Reviewed Journals presents an insider's perspective on the secret business of academic publishing, making explicit many of the dilemmas and struggles faced by all writers, but rarely discussed. Its unique approach is theorised and practical. It offers a set of moves for writing a journal article that is structured and doable but also attends to the identity issues that manifest on the page and in the (...)
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  6. Wonbin Park (2008). Subject From Ethic? Or Subject From Philosophy? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:265-269.score: 24.0
    Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995), a French Philosopher and a Jew, became known first for his role in the introduction of Husserl’s phenomenology to France, and later for his criticisms of Husserl and Heidegger. As the Holocaust gave a significant impact on many theologians and philosophers to establish their theoretical systems, Levinas realized how ethic of responsibility was important through his personal tragic experience. What most peculiar character of his experience is that it leads him to cast a doubt a subject-oriented modern (...)
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  7. Susan Haack (2007). Peer Review and Publication: Lessons for Lawyers. Stetson Law Review 36 (3).score: 24.0
    Peer review and publication is one of the factors proposed in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. as indicia of the reliability of scientific testimony. This Article traces the origins of the peer-review system, the process by which it became standard at scientific and medical journals, and the many roles it now plays. Additionally, the Author articulates the epistemological rationale for pre-publication peer-review and the inherent limitations of the system as a scientific quality-control mechanism. The Article explores recent changes in (...)
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  8. Chrisoula Andreou (2006). Standards, Advice, and Practical Reason. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):57-67.score: 18.0
    Is there a mode of sincere advice in which the standards of the adviser are put aside in favor of the standards of the advisee? I consider two sorts of cases that appear to be such that the adviser is evaluating things from within the advisee’s system of standards even though this system conflicts with her own; and I argue that these cases are best interpreted in ways that dissolve this appearance. I then argue that the nature of sincere (...)
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  9. Barbara Robin Mescher (2008). The Business of Commercial Legal Advice and the Ethical Implications for Lawyers and Their Clients. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):913 - 926.score: 18.0
    Company directors and executives seek legal advice outside the company on a regular basis. This advice is meant to be given within the context of the lawyers’ professional obligations and ethical practise. What clients may not appreciate is there is often a conflict of interest between the lawyers’ professional and ethical concerns and the legal advice business. If lawyers follow their business interests, their advice may be incomplete especially in relation to the ethical consequences of that (...)
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  10. Udo Schüklenk (2011). Publishing Bioethics and Bioethics – Reflections on Academic Publishing by a Journal Editor. Bioethics 25 (2):57-61.score: 18.0
    This article by one of the Editors of Bioethics, published in the 25th anniversary issue of the journal, describes some of the revolutionary changes academic publishing has undergone during the last decades. Many humanities journals went from typically small print-runs, counting by the hundreds, to on-line availability in thousands of university libraries worldwide. Article up-take by our subscribers can be measured efficiently. The implications of this and other changes to academic publishing are discussed. Important ethical challenges need to (...)
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  11. Michael Feuer & Christina Maranto (2010). Science Advice as Procedural Rationality: Reflections on the National Research Council. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (3):259-275.score: 18.0
    Since its founding in 1863, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has occupied a special niche in the complex ecology of advice-giving in the United States. Established as a small, private organization with special responsibilities and obligations vis à vis the American people and government, the Academy has expanded considerably in the past century and a half and now releases, through the National Research Council (NRC), its operating arm, more than 200 reports per year, on topics covering nearly the (...)
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  12. Michael Parker (2013). The Ethics of Open Access Publishing. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):16.score: 18.0
    Should those who work on ethics welcome or resist moves to open access publishing? This paper analyses arguments in favour and against the increasing requirement for open access publishing and considers their implications for bioethics research. In the context of biomedical science, major funders are increasingly mandating open access as a condition of funding and such moves are also common in other disciplines. Whilst there has been some debate about the implications of open-access for the social sciences and (...)
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  13. Liviu Andreescu (2013). Self-Plagiarism in Academic Publishing: The Anatomy of a Misnomer. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):775-797.score: 18.0
    The paper discusses self-plagiarism and associated practices in scholarly publishing. It approaches at some length the conceptual issues raised by the notion of self-plagiarism. It distinguishes among and then examines the main families of arguments against self-plagiarism, as well as the question of possibly legitimate reasons to engage in this practice. It concludes that some of the animus frequently reserved for self-plagiarism may be the result of, among others, poor choice of a label, unwarranted generalizations as to its ill (...)
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  14. Anna Paldam Folker & Peter Sandøe (2008). Leaping “Out of the Doubt”—Nutrition Advice: Values at Stake in Communicating Scientific Uncertainty to the Public. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (2):176-191.score: 18.0
    This article deals with scientific advice to the public where the relevant science is subject to public attention and uncertainty of knowledge. It focuses on a tension in the management and presentation of scientific uncertainty between the uncertain nature of science and the expectation that scientific advisers will provide clear public guidance. In the first part of the paper the tension is illustrated by the presentation of results from a recent interview study with nutrition scientists in Denmark. According to (...)
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  15. Dragan Djuric (forthcoming). Penetrating the Omerta of Predatory Publishing: The Romanian Connection. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.score: 18.0
    Not so long ago, a well institutionalized predatory journal exposed itself by publishing a hoax article that blew the whistle for its devastating influence on the academic affairs of a small country. This paper puts that experiment in context, gives all the important details and analyzes the results. The experiment was inspired by well-known cases of scientific activism and is in line with recent efforts against predatory publishers. The paper presents the evidence in detail and uses it to analyze (...)
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  16. Thomas Fossen & Joel Anderson (forthcoming). What’s the Point of Voting Advice Applications? Competing Perspectives on Democracy and Citizenship. Electoral Studies.score: 18.0
    Voting advice applications (VAAs) are interactive online tools designed to assist voters by improving the basis on which they decide how to vote. Current VAAs typically aim to do so by matching users’ policy-preferences with the positions of parties or candidates. But this ‘matching model’ depends crucially on implicit, contestable presuppositions about the proper functioning of the electoral process and about the forms of competence required for good citizenship—presuppositions associated with the social choice conception of democracy. This paper aims (...)
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  17. Ute Volkmann, Uwe Schimank & Markus Rost (2014). Two Worlds of Academic Publishing: Chemistry and German Sociology in Comparison. Minerva 52 (2):187-212.score: 18.0
    The communication infrastructure of modern science is provided by profit-oriented business firms: the publishing houses which print and distribute academic books and journals. Surprisingly, beyond some rather superficial impressions, in science studies little is known about how academic publishers work—in particular, how markets for books and journals look like, how publication decisions are taken, and how the interplay with the scientific community is arranged. We address these questions with a focus on the relation between economic considerations of publishers, on (...)
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  18. Yair Neuman, Norbert Marwan & Danny Livshitz (2009). The Complexity of Advice‐Giving. Complexity 15 (2):28-30.score: 15.0
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  19. W. Fach, H. Atmanspacher, K. Landolt, T. Wyss & W. Rössler (2013). A Comparative Study of Exceptional Experiences of Clients Seeking Advice and of Subjects in an Ordinary Population. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  20. Sami Pihlström (2014). Academic Publishing and Interdisciplinarity: Finnish Experiences. Human Affairs 24 (1):40-47.score: 15.0
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  21. Iain Pirie (2009). The Political Economy of Academic Publishing. Historical Materialism 17 (3):31-60.score: 15.0
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  22. Christina Banou (2013). The Organization of Book-Publishing Houses in a Changing Era. Logos 24 (1):30-40.score: 15.0
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  23. Alison Baverstock (2012). Why Self-Publishing Needs to Be Taken Seriously. Logos 23 (4):41-46.score: 15.0
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  24. Oliver Freeman (2012). An Australian Perspective on the Future of Book Publishing. Logos 23 (3):34-47.score: 15.0
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  25. Anne Mason & Andrew Street (2006). Publishing Outcome Data: Is It an Effective Approach? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (1):37-48.score: 15.0
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  26. Hal Robinson (2012). Digital Publishing. Logos 23 (4):7-20.score: 15.0
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  27. Joel Anderson & Thomas Fossen (forthcoming). Voting Advice Applications and Political Theory: Citizenship, Participation and Representation. In Garzia Diego & Marschall Stefan (eds.), Matching Voters with Parties and Candidates. ECPR Press. 217-226.score: 15.0
  28. Guido Biele, Jörg Rieskamp & Richard Gonzalez (2009). Computational Models for the Combination of Advice and Individual Learning. Cognitive Science 33 (2):206-242.score: 15.0
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  29. John Helmer (2012). Publishing and the Social Web Report From the Second Semantico Online Publishing Symposium, London, November 2011. Logos 23 (2):21-30.score: 15.0
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  30. Smangele Mathebula (2013). Missionary Publishing in South Africa. Logos 24 (1):41-46.score: 15.0
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  31. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.score: 14.0
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
     
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  32. Uri D. Leibowitz (2009). Moral Advice and Moral Theory. Philosophical Studies 146 (3):349 - 359.score: 12.0
    Monists, pluralists, and particularists disagree about the structure of the best explanation of the rightness (wrongness) of actions. In this paper I argue that the availability of good moral advice gives us reason to prefer particularist theories and pluralist theories to monist theories. First, I identify two distinct roles of moral theorizing—explaining the rightness (wrongness) of actions, and providing moral advice—and I explain how these two roles are related. Next, I explain what monists, pluralists, and particularists disagree about. (...)
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  33. Hallvard Lillehammer (2013). A Distinction Without a Difference? Good Advice for Moral Error Theorists. Ratio 26 (3):373-390.score: 12.0
    This paper explores the prospects of different forms of moral error theory. It is argued that only a suitably local error theory would make good sense of the fact that it is possible to give and receive genuinely good moral advice.
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  34. Moti Mizrahi (2010). Take My Advice—I Am Not Following It: Ad Hominem Arguments as Legitimate Rebuttals to Appeals to Authority. Informal Logic 30 (4):435-456.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I argue that ad hominem arguments are not always fallacious. More explicitly, in certain cases of practical reasoning, the circumstances of a person are relevant to whether or not the conclusion should be accepted. This occurs, I suggest, when a person gives advice to others or prescribes certain courses of action but fails to follow her own advice or act in accordance with her own prescriptions. This is not an instance of a fallacious tu quoque (...)
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  35. Bengt Hansson, Hans van Ditmarsch, Pascal Engel, Sven Ove Hansson, Vincent Hendricks, Søren Holm, Pauline Jacobson, Anthonie Meijers, Henry S. Richardson & Hans Rott (2011). A Theoria Round Table on Philosophy Publishing. Theoria 77 (2):104-116.score: 12.0
    As part of the conference commemorating Theoria's 75th anniversary, a round table discussion on philosophy publishing was held in Bergendal, Sollentuna, Sweden, on 1 October 2010. Bengt Hansson was the chair, and the other participants were eight editors-in-chief of philosophy journals: Hans van Ditmarsch (Journal of Philosophical Logic), Pascal Engel (Dialectica), Sven Ove Hansson (Theoria), Vincent Hendricks (Synthese), Søren Holm (Journal of Medical Ethics), Pauline Jacobson (Linguistics and Philosophy), Anthonie Meijers (Philosophical Explorations), Henry S. Richardson (Ethics) and Hans Rott (...)
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  36. Robert Neal Johnson (1997). Reasons and Advice for the Practically Rational. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (3):619-625.score: 12.0
    This paper defends a model of the internalism requirement against Michael Smith's recent criticisms of it. On this "example model", what we have reason to do is what we would be motivated to do were we rational. After criticizing the example model, Smith argues that his "advice model", that what we have reason to do is what we would advise ourselves to do were we rational, is obviously preferable. The author argues that Smith's criticisms can quite easily be accommodated (...)
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  37. Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2007). Value Pluralism and Coherentist Justification of Ethical Advice. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):81-97.score: 12.0
    Liberal societies are characterized by respect for a fundamental value pluralism; i.e., respect for individuals’ rights to live by their own conception of the good. Still, the state must make decisions that privilege some values at the cost of others. When public ethics committees give substantial ethical advice on policy related issues, it is therefore important that this advice is well justified. The use of explicit tools for ethical assessment can contribute to justifying advice. In this article, (...)
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  38. Daniel Hausman, Beware of Economists Bearing Advice.score: 12.0
    Beware of economists bearing advice. Though some of it is valuable, the framework of theoretical welfare economics from which economic advice usually issues has serious normative limitations and distortions. When economists go beyond identifying consequences of policies to making recommendations, they typically rely on a theory whose only normative concern is welfare and its distribution and that mistakenly identifies welfare with the satisfaction of preferences. Their advice about how to increase welfare must accordingly be regarded with caution, (...)
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  39. Judith Simon (2011). A Socio-Epistemological Framework for Scientific Publishing. Social Epistemology 24 (3):201-218.score: 12.0
    In this paper I propose a new theoretical framework to analyse socio?technical epistemic practices and systems on the Web and beyond, and apply it to the topic of web?based scientific publishing. This framework is informed by social epistemology, science and technology studies (STS) and feminist epistemology. Its core consists of a tripartite classification of socio?technical epistemic systems based on the mechanisms of closure they employ to terminate socio?epistemic processes in which multiple agents are involved. In particular I distinguish three (...)
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  40. Marion Godman & Sven Ove Hansson (2009). European Public Advice on Nanobiotechnology—Four Convergence Seminars. Nanoethics 3 (1):43-59.score: 12.0
    In order to explore public views on nanobiotechnology (NBT), convergence seminars were held in four places in Europe; namely in Visby (Sweden), Sheffield (UK), Lublin (Poland), and Porto (Portugal). A convergence seminar is a new form of public participatory activity that can be used to deal systematically with the uncertainty associated for instance with the development of an emerging technology like nanobiotechnology. In its first phase, the participants are divided into three “scenario groups” that discuss different future scenarios. In the (...)
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  41. Dov M. Gabbay & John Woods, Advice on Abductive Logic.score: 12.0
    One of our purposes here is to expose something of the elementary logical structure of abductive reasoning, and to do so in a way that helps orient theorists to the various tasks that a logic of abduction should concern itself with. We are mindful of criticisms that have been levelled against the very idea of a logic of abduction; so we think it prudent to proceed with a certain diffidence. That our own account of abduction is itself abductive is methodological (...)
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  42. A. Fyfe (2002). Publishing and the Classics: Paley's Natural Theology and the Nineteenth-Century Scientific Canon. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (4):729-751.score: 12.0
    This article seeks a new way to conceptualise the 'classic' work in the history of science, and suggests that the use of publishing history might help avoid the antagonism which surrounded the literary canon wars. It concentrates on the widely acknowledged concept that the key to the classic work is the fact of its being read over a prolonged period of time. Continued reading implies that a work is able to remain relevant to later generations of readers, and, although (...)
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  43. Eric Wiland (2003). Some Advice for Moral Psychologists. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (3):299–310.score: 12.0
    Recently, philosophers have employed the notion of advice to tackle a variety of philosophical problems. In particular, Michael Smith and Nomy Arpaly have in different ways related the notion of advice to the notion of a reason for action. Here I argue that both accounts are flawed, because each operates with a simplistic picture of the way advice works. I conclude that it would be wise to take more time to analyze what advice is and how (...)
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  44. I. Brannstrom (2012). Publishing Ethics in Paediatric Research: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Review. Nursing Ethics 19 (2):268-278.score: 12.0
    The present article aims to scrutinize publishing ethics in the fields of paediatrics and paediatric nursing. Full-text readings of all original research articles in paediatrics from a high-income economy, i.e. Sweden, and from all low-income economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, were reviewed as they were indexed and stored in Web of Science for the search period from 1 January 2007 to 7 October 2009. The application of quantitative and qualitative content analysis revealed a marked discrepancy in publishing frequencies between (...)
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  45. Giovanna Devetag, Hykel Hosni & Giacomo Sillari (2013). You Better Play 7: Mutual Versus Common Knowledge of Advice in a Weak-Link Experiment. Synthese 190 (8):1351-1381.score: 12.0
    This paper presents the results of an experiment on mutual versus common knowledge of advice in a two-player weak-link game with random matching. Our experimental subjects play in pairs for thirteen rounds. After a brief learning phase common to all treatments, we vary the knowledge levels associated with external advice given in the form of a suggestion to pick the strategy supporting the payoff-dominant equilibrium. Our results are somewhat surprising and can be summarized as follows: in all our (...)
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  46. Gail D. Heyman, Lalida Sritanyaratana & Kimberly E. Vanderbilt (2013). Young Children's Trust in Overtly Misleading Advice. Cognitive Science 37 (4):646-667.score: 12.0
    The ability of 3- and 4-year-old children to disregard advice from an overtly misleading informant was investigated across five studies (total n = 212). Previous studies have documented limitations in young children's ability to reject misleading advice. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that these limitations are primarily due to an inability to reject specific directions that are provided by others, rather than an inability to respond in a way that is opposite to what has been (...)
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  47. Susan C. Borkowski & Mary Jeanne Welsh (2000). Ethical Practice in the Accounting Publishing Process: Contrasting Opinions of Authors and Editors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):15 - 31.score: 12.0
    Academic accounting researchers often offer anecdotal evidence that the publishing process is rife with unfair and unethical practices, and similar contradictory evidence supports accounting journal editors' claims that the process is fair and ethical. This study compares the perceptions of accounting authors and editors on the ethicacy and frequency of specific author, editor and reviewer practices. Both authors and editors are in general agreement about the ethical nature of editors and author practices. However, there are significant differences between the (...)
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  48. Eyvind Ohm & Valerie A. Thompson (2004). Everyday Reasoning with Inducements and Advice. Thinking and Reasoning 10 (3):241 – 272.score: 12.0
    In two experiments, we investigated how people interpret and reason with realistic conditionals in the form of inducements (i.e., promises and threats) and advice (i.e., tips and warnings). We found that inducements and advice differed with respect to the degree to which the speaker was perceived to have (a) control over the consequent, (b) a stake in the outcome, and (c) an obligation to ensure that the outcome occurs. Inducements and advice also differed with respect to perceived (...)
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  49. Michiel Korthals (2003). Do We Need Berlin Walls or Chinese Walls Between Research, Public Consultation, and Advice? New Public Responsibilities for Life Scientists. Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (4):385-395.score: 12.0
    During the coming decades, life scientists will become involved more than ever in the public and private lives of patients and consumers, as health and food sciences shift from a collective approach towards individualization, from a curative to a preventive approach, and from being driven by desires rather than by technology. This means that the traditional relationships between the activities of life scientists – conducting research, advising industry, governments, and patients/consumers, consulting the public, and prescribing products, be it patents, drugs (...)
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  50. Piccoli Barbara (2013). "Advice to the Medical Students in My Service": The Rediscovery of a Golden Book by Jean Hamburger, Father of Nephrology and of Medical Humanities. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):2-.score: 12.0
    Jean Hamburger (1909--1992) is considered the founder of the concept of medical intensive care (reanimation medicale) and the first to propose the name Nephrology for the branch of medicine dealing with kidney diseases. One of the first kidney grafts in the world (with short-term success), in 1953, and the first dialysis session in France, in 1955, were performed under his guidance. His achievements as a writer were at least comparable: Hamburger was awarded several important literary prizes, including prix Femina, prix (...)
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