Search results for 'Purposiveness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  59
    Avery Goldman (2010). An Antinomy of Political Judgment: Kant, Arendt, and the Role of Purposiveness in Reflective Judgment. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):331-352.
    This article builds on Arendt’s development of a Kantian politics from out of the conception of reflective judgment in the Critique of Judgment. Arendt looks to Kant’s analysis of the beautiful to explain how political thought can be conceived. And yet Arendt describes such Kantian reflection as an empirical undertaking that justifies itself only in relation to the abstract principle of the moral law. The problem for such an account is that the autonomy of the moral law appears to be (...)
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  2. Rachel Zuckert (2006). The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):599-622.
    Rachel Zuckert - The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 599-622 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism Rachel Zuckert In the "critique of aesthetic judgment," Kant claims that when we find an object beautiful, we are appreciating its "purposive form." Many of Kant's readers have found this claim one of his (...)
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  3.  74
    Thomas Teufel (2011). Kant's Non -Teleological Conception of Purposiveness. Kant-Studien 102 (2):232-252.
    In this paper I argue, first, that Kant's technical definition of purposiveness in § 10 of the third Critique is designed to abstract from all forward-looking considerations (teleological, intentional, normative, etc.) that accompany the conventional understanding of the term. Kant seeks to establish a strictly backward-looking, etiological conception of purposiveness in order to capture the causal link connecting artifacts with their concepts. I argue, second, that he succeeds. Kant's etiological conception of purposiveness neither collapses into mere mechanism, (...)
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  4.  45
    Fiona Hughes (2006). On Aesthetic Judgement and Our Relation to Nature: Kant's Concept of Purposiveness. Inquiry 49 (6):547-572.
    I offer a critical reconstruction of Kant's thesis that aesthetic judgement is founded on the principle of the purposiveness of nature. This has been taken as equivalent to the claim that aesthetics is directly linked to the systematicity of nature in its empirical laws. I take issue both with Henry Allison, who seeks to marginalize this claim, and with Avner Baz, who highlights it in order to argue that Kant's aesthetics are merely instrumental for his epistemology. My solution is (...)
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  5.  47
    Luigi Caranti (2005). Logical Purposiveness and the Principle of Taste. Kant-Studien 96 (3):364-374.
    In both Introductions to the Critique of Judgment Kant seems to identify the a priori principle at the basis of aesthetic judgments with the principle that guides reflective judgment in its cognitive inquiry of nature, i.e. the purposiveness of nature or systematicity. For instance Kant writes.
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  6. R. A. Makkreel (1992). Purposiveness in History: Its Status After Kant, Hegel, Dilthey and Habermas. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):221-234.
  7.  6
    John Zammito (2009). Kant's Notion of Intrinsic Purposiveness in the Critique of Judgment. Kant Yearbook 1 (1).
  8.  16
    Angela Breitenbach (2014). Biological Purposiveness and Analogical Reflection. In Eric Watkins & Ina Goy (eds.), Kant's Theory of Biology. De Gruyter 131-148.
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  9.  54
    Avner Baz (2005). Kant's Principle of Purposiveness and the Missing Point of (Aesthetic) Judgements. Kantian Review 10 (1):1-32.
    My plan in this article is to begin by raising the question of the point of judgements of beauty, and then to examine Kant's account of beauty in the third Critique from the perspective opened up by that question. Having raised the question of the point, I will argue, first, that there is an implied answer to it in Kant's text, and, second, that the answer is ultimately unsatisfying in that it falsely assumes that there is a ‘need’, or ‘task’, (...)
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  10. Justin Steinberg (2011). Spinoza on Human Purposiveness and Mental Causation. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 14.
     
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  11. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reflective Judgment and the Application of Logic to Nature: Kant's Deduction of the Principle of Purposiveness as an Answer to Hume. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Oxford University Press
  12.  34
    Shidan Lotfi (2010). The 'Purposiveness' of Life. The Monist 93 (1):123 - 134.
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  13.  35
    Rudolf A. Makkreel (1992). Regulative and Reflective Uses of Purposiveness in Kant. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):49-63.
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  14.  11
    Katerina Deligiorgi (2014). The Pleasures of Contra‐Purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):25-35.
    Serious doubts have been raised about the coherence of theories of the sublime and the usefulness of the concept. By contrast, the sublime is increasingly studied as a key function in Kant's moral psychology and in his ethics. This article combines methodological conservatism, approaching the topic from within Kant's discussion of aesthetic judgment, with reconstruction of a conception of human agency that is tenable on Kantian grounds. I argue that a coherent theory of the sublime is possible and useful, and (...)
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  15.  22
    Barry Allen (2003). The Abyss of Contingency: Purposiveness and Contingency in Darwin and Kant. History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):373 - 391.
  16.  4
    Alix Cohen (2009). Purposiveness Without a Purpose. [REVIEW] Metascience 18 (2):343-345.
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  17.  19
    Bradford McCall (2011). Purpose in the Living World? Creation and Emergent Evolution. By Jacob Klapwijk and Purposiveness: Teleology Between Nature and Mind. Edited by Luca Illetterati and Francesca Michelini. Heythrop Journal 52 (2):321-322.
  18.  14
    Mary L. Coolidge (1944). Purposiveness Without Purpose in a New Context. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 4 (1):85-93.
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  19.  2
    Philippe Huneman (2014). Purposiveness, Necessity, and Contingency. In Eric Watkins & Ina Goy (eds.), Kant's Theory of Biology. De Gruyter 185-202.
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  20.  11
    Edmund Noble (1914). Purposiveness in Nature and Life. The Monist 24 (2):259-283.
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  21.  7
    Philippe Huneman, Possibility, Necessity and Purposiveness: The Metaphysical Novelties in the Critique of Judgement.
  22.  9
    Hans Lindahl (1998). The Purposiveness of Law: Two Concepts of Representation in the European Union. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 17 (5/6):481 - 507.
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  23.  5
    Mary-Barbara Zeldin † (1983). Formal Purposiveness and the Continuity of Kant's Argument in the Critique of Judgment. Kant-Studien 74 (1):45-55.
  24.  1
    Ted Kinnaman (2013). Kant and McDowell on the Purposiveness of Nature. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 771-780.
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  25.  1
    Linda C. Palmer (2013). An Old Approach to a New Riddle – Kantian Purposiveness and Goodman’s Projectibility. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 185-196.
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  26.  1
    Masatoshi Shimono (2013). Kant’s Conception of Internal Purposiveness Revisited: An Examination of a ‘Latent’ Antinomy of Teleological Power of Judgment. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 223-232.
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  27. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2008). The Purposiveness of Nature: Kant and Environmental Ethics. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht Und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. 3--12.
     
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  28. Angela Breitenbach (2010). Purposiveness: Teleology Between Nature and Mind. [REVIEW] Studi Kantiani 23.
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  29. B. Dorflinger (1991). Teleology and the Problem of Transition-a Commentary on Regulative and Reflective Uses of Purposiveness in Kant. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30:65-71.
     
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  30. Ronnie Hawkins (2004). Purposiveness Is Not Paradoxical: All Living Organisms Are Teleological And That's The Origin Of All "Value" From Amoebas To Humans. Florida Philosophical Review 4 (1):64-67.
     
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  31. Ralph Barton Perry (1918). Docility and Purposiveness. Philosophical Review 27:435.
     
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  32. Ralph Barton Perry (1918). Docility and Purposiveness. Psychological Review 25 (1):1-20.
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  33.  11
    Nicholas Maxwell (1984). The Generalized Darwinian Research Programme. In From Knowledge to Wisdom. Blackwell 269-275.
    The generalized Darwinian research programme accepts physicalism, but holds that all life is purposive in character. It seeks to understand how and why all purposiveness has evolved in the universe – especially purposiveness associated with what we value most in human life, such as sentience, consciousness, person-to-person understanding, science, art, free¬dom, love. As evolution proceeds, the mechanisms of evolution themselves evolve to take into account the increasingly important role that purposive action can play - especially when quasi-Lamarckian evolution (...)
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  34.  32
    Lawrence Pasternack (2011). Regulative Principles and ‘the Wise Author of Nature’. Religious Studies 47 (4):411-429.
    There is much more said in the Critique of Pure Reason about the relationship between God and purposiveness than what is found in Kant's analysis of the physico-theological (design) argument. The ‘Wise Author of Nature’ is central to his analysis of regulative principles in the ‘Appendix to the Transcendental Dialectic’ and also appears in the ‘Canon’, first with regards to the Highest Good and then again in relation to our theoretical use of purposiveness. This paper will begin with (...)
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  35. Holly L. Wilson (2008). The Green Kant: Kant's Treatment of Animals. In Paul Pojman Louis Pojman (ed.), in Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application.
    Kant's theory of animals is based on his belief that animals have presentations and consciousness and in this are like human beings. When we abuse animals then we are more likely to abuse human beings. But animals are organic beings that have internal purposiveness and hence are ends for which other things are means. In this limited sense animals have intrinsic value.
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  36.  5
    Daniel Rothbart & Irmgard Scherer (1997). Kant's Critique of Judgment and the Scientific Investigation of Matter. Hyle 3 (1):65 - 80.
    Kant's theory of judgment establishes the conceptual framework for understanding the subtle relationships between the experimental scientist, the modern instrument, and nature's atomic particles. The principle of purposiveness which governs judgment has also a role in implicitly guiding modern experimental science. In Part 1 we explore Kant's philosophy of science as he shows how knowledge of material nature and unobservable entities is possible. In Part 2 we examine the way in which Kant's treatment of judgment, with its operating principle (...)
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  37.  69
    William E. Lyons (1980). Emotion. Cambridge University Press.
    In this study William Lyons presents a sustained and coherent theory of the emotions, and one which draws extensively on the work of psychologists and physiologists in the area. Dr Lyons starts by giving a thorough and critical survey of other principal theories, before setting out his own 'causal-evaluative' account. In addition to giving an analysis of the nature of emotion - in which, Dr Lyon argues, evaluative attitudes play a crucial part - his theory throws light on the motivating (...)
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  38.  10
    Yoshimi Kawade (2009). On the Nature of the Subjectivity of Living Things. Biosemiotics 2 (2):205-220.
    A biosemiotic view of living things is presented that supersedes the mechanistic view of life prevalent in biology today. Living things are active agents with autonomous subjectivity, whose structure is triadic, consisting of the individual organism, its Umwelt and the society. Sociality inheres in every living thing since the very origin of life on the earth. The temporality of living things is guided by the purpose to live, which works as the semantic boundary condition for the processes of embodiment of (...)
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  39. James Kreines (forthcoming). Kant and Hegel on Teleology and Life From the Perspective of Debates About Free Will. In Thomas Khurana (ed.), THE FREEDOM OF LIFE. Hegelian Perspectives. Walther König
    Kant’s treatment of teleology and life in the Critique of the Power of Judgment is complicated and difficult to interpret; Hegel’s response adds considerable complexity. I propose a new way of understanding the underlying philosophical issues in this debate, allowing a better understanding of the underlying structure of the arguments in Kant and Hegel. My new way is unusual: I use for an interpretive lens some structural features of familiar debates about freedom of the will. These debates, I argue, allow (...)
     
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  40.  31
    William P. Kiblinger (2007). Evolution and Subjectivity. Zygon 42 (1):193-202.
    Evolutionary theory is becoming an all-encompassing form of explanation in many branches of philosophy. However, emergence theory uses the concept of self-organization to support yet alter traditional evolutionary explanation. Biologist Stuart Kauffman suggests that the new science will need to tell stories, not simply as a heuristic device but as part of its fundamental task. This claim is reminiscent of C. S. Peirce’s criticism of the doctrine of necessity. Peirce’s suggestions reference Hegel, and this essay draws out this Hegelian background. (...)
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  41.  32
    Douglas C. Long (1979). Agents, Mechanisms, and Other Minds. In Donald F. Gustafson & Bangs L. Tapscott (eds.), Body, Mind And Method. Dordrecht: Reidel 129--148.
    One of the goals of physiologists who study the detailed physical, chemical,and neurological mechanisms operating within the human body is to understand the intricate causal processes which underlie human abilities and activities. It is doubtless premature to predict that they will eventually be able to explain the behaviour of a particular human being as we might now explain the behaviour of a pendulum clock or even the invisible changes occurring within the hardware of a modern electronic computer. Nonetheless, it seems (...)
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  42.  95
    Stephen Andrew Butterfill & Corrado Sinigaglia (2014). Intention and Motor Representation in Purposive Action. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):119-145.
    Are there distinct roles for intention and motor representation in explaining the purposiveness of action? Standard accounts of action assign a role to intention but are silent on motor representation. The temptation is to suppose that nothing need be said here because motor representation is either only an enabling condition for purposive action or else merely a variety of intention. This paper provides reasons for resisting that temptation. Some motor representations, like intentions, coordinate actions in virtue of representing outcomes; (...)
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  43.  40
    Marilyn Stendera (2015). Being-in-the-World, Temporality and Autopoiesis. Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy 24:261-284.
    To understand the radical potential of Heidegger’s model of practice, we need to acknowledge the role that temporality plays within it. Commentaries on Heidegger’s account of practical engagement, however, often leave the connection between purposiveness and temporality unexplored, a tendency that persists in the contemporary discourse generated by the interaction between the phenomenological tradition and certain approaches within cognitive science. Taking up a temporality-oriented reading that redresses this can, I want to argue here, reveal new illuminating sites for the (...)
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  44. Andreas Weber & Francisco J. Varela (2002). Life After Kant: Natural Purposes and the Autopoietic Foundations of Biological Individuality. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):97-125.
    This paper proposes a basic revision of the understanding of teleology in biological sciences. Since Kant, it has become customary to view purposiveness in organisms as a bias added by the observer; the recent notion of teleonomy expresses well this as-if character of natural purposes. In recent developments in science, however, notions such as self-organization (or complex systems) and the autopoiesis viewpoint, have displaced emergence and circular self-production as central features of life. Contrary to an often superficial reading, Kant (...)
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  45.  8
    Fabian Dorsch (2015). Focused Daydreaming and Mind-Wandering. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):791-813.
    In this paper, I describe and discuss two mental phenomena which are somewhat neglected in the philosophy of mind: focused daydreaming and mind-wandering. My aim is to show that their natures are rather distinct, despite the fact that we tend to classify both as instances of daydreaming. The first difference between the two, I argue, is that, while focused daydreaming is an instance of imaginative mental agency, mind-wandering is not—though this does not mean that mind-wandering cannot involve mental agency at (...)
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  46.  12
    Ingvild Torsen (2016). Disinterest and Truth: On Heidegger’s Interpretation of Kant’s Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (1):15-32.
    In this article, I aim to interpret and contextualize Heidegger’s short interpretation of Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgement. I provide a more accurate picture of Heidegger’s interpretation of Kant, showing that his reading is both appreciative and original, if speculative. I argue that Heidegger’s analysis of Kant’s aesthetics is surprisingly at odds with his general characterization and criticism of modern aesthetics. The latter can be captured by two basic theses—art is determined by a subject’s experience and art reveals (...)
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  47.  22
    Katerina Deligiorgi, Finite Agents, Sublime Feelings: Response to Hanauer.
    Tom Hanauer's thoughtful discussion piece puts pressure on the affective phenomenology of the sublime sketched in "The Pleasures of Contra-Purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human". My aim in that paper was to present a theory of the sublime that does not suffer from the problems identified by Jane Forsey in her "Is A Theory of the Sublime Possible?". The present paper is a response to Hanauer's discussion.
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  48.  48
    Fabian Dorsch (2015). Focused Daydreaming and Mind-Wandering. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):791-813.
    In this paper, I describe and discuss two mental phenomena which are somewhat neglected in the philosophy of mind: focused daydreaming and mind-wandering. My aim is to show that their natures are rather distinct, despite the fact that we tend to classify both as instances of daydreaming. The first difference between the two, I argue, is that, while focused daydreaming is an instance of imaginative mental agency, mind-wandering is not—though this does not mean that mind-wandering cannot involve mental agency at (...)
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  49.  77
    Nicholas Maxwell (2010). Darwinian Theory Reinterpreted. In N. Maxwell (ed.), Cutting God in Half - And Putting the Pieces Together Again: A New Approach to Philosophy. Pentire Press 264-300.
    It is argued that purposive action of living things plays a crucial role in Darwinian evolution. As evolution proceeds, the mechanisms of evolution evolve as well, giving an increasingly important role to purposive action - to be understood in a sense which is compatible with physics (the atom of purposiveness being the thermostat). Nine versions of Darwinian theory are distinguished. The first denies that purposive action has any role in evolution at all; each successive version gives an inceasingly important (...)
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  50. Edward J. Lawler, Cecilia Ridgeway & Barry Markovsky (1993). Structural Social Psychology and the Micro-Macro Problem. Sociological Theory 11 (3):268-290.
    A unique multilevel perspective-structural social psychology-is explicated to help build theoretical bridges between micro and macro levels of analysis in sociology. The perspective portrays actors (human or corporate) as having minimal properties of purposiveness and responsiveness, encounters as interaction episodes between multiple actors, microstructures as local patterns of interaction emerging from and subsequently influencing encounters, and macrostructures as networks of social positions. These levels of analysis are connected via mutually contingent processes. Applying these assumptions, we illustrate the ability of (...)
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