Search results for 'Purposiveness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Avery Goldman (2010). An Antinomy of Political Judgment: Kant, Arendt, and the Role of Purposiveness in Reflective Judgment. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):331-352.score: 18.0
    This article builds on Arendt’s development of a Kantian politics from out of the conception of reflective judgment in the Critique of Judgment. Arendt looks to Kant’s analysis of the beautiful to explain how political thought can be conceived. And yet Arendt describes such Kantian reflection as an empirical undertaking that justifies itself only in relation to the abstract principle of the moral law. The problem for such an account is that the autonomy of the moral law appears to be (...)
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  2. Thomas Teufel (2011). Kant's Non -Teleological Conception of Purposiveness. Kant-Studien 102 (2):232-252.score: 12.0
    In this paper I argue, first, that Kant's technical definition of purposiveness in § 10 of the third Critique is designed to abstract from all forward-looking considerations (teleological, intentional, normative, etc.) that accompany the conventional understanding of the term. Kant seeks to establish a strictly backward-looking, etiological conception of purposiveness in order to capture the causal link connecting artifacts with their concepts. I argue, second, that he succeeds. Kant's etiological conception of purposiveness neither collapses into mere mechanism, (...)
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  3. Fiona Hughes (2006). On Aesthetic Judgement and Our Relation to Nature: Kant's Concept of Purposiveness. Inquiry 49 (6):547-572.score: 12.0
    I offer a critical reconstruction of Kant's thesis that aesthetic judgement is founded on the principle of the purposiveness of nature. This has been taken as equivalent to the claim that aesthetics is directly linked to the systematicity of nature in its empirical laws. I take issue both with Henry Allison, who seeks to marginalize this claim, and with Avner Baz, who highlights it in order to argue that Kant's aesthetics are merely instrumental for his epistemology. My solution is (...)
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  4. Luigi Caranti (2005). Logical Purposiveness and the Principle of Taste. Kant-Studien 96 (3):364-374.score: 12.0
    In both Introductions to the Critique of Judgment Kant seems to identify the a priori principle at the basis of aesthetic judgments with the principle that guides reflective judgment in its cognitive inquiry of nature, i.e. the purposiveness of nature or systematicity. For instance Kant writes.
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  5. Rachel Zuckert (2006). The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):599-622.score: 9.0
  6. Avner Baz (2005). Kant's Principle of Purposiveness and the Missing Point of (Aesthetic) Judgements. Kantian Review 10 (1):1-32.score: 9.0
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  7. Lawrence Pasternack (2011). Regulative Principles and ‘the Wise Author of Nature’. Religious Studies 47 (4):411-429.score: 9.0
    There is much more said in the Critique of Pure Reason about the relationship between God and purposiveness than what is found in Kant's analysis of the physico-theological (design) argument. The ‘Wise Author of Nature’ is central to his analysis of regulative principles in the ‘Appendix to the Transcendental Dialectic’ and also appears in the ‘Canon’, first with regards to the Highest Good and then again in relation to our theoretical use of purposiveness. This paper will begin with (...)
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  8. Shidan Lotfi (2010). The 'Purposiveness' of Life. The Monist 93 (1):123 - 134.score: 9.0
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  9. Rudolf A. Makkreel (1992). Regulative and Reflective Uses of Purposiveness in Kant. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):49-63.score: 9.0
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  10. Bradford McCall (2011). Purpose in the Living World? Creation and Emergent Evolution. By Jacob Klapwijk and Purposiveness: Teleology Between Nature and Mind. Edited by Luca Illetterati and Francesca Michelini. Heythrop Journal 52 (2):321-322.score: 9.0
  11. Barry Allen (2003). The Abyss of Contingency: Purposiveness and Contingency in Darwin and Kant. History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):373 - 391.score: 9.0
  12. R. A. Makkreel (1992). Purposiveness in History: Its Status After Kant, Hegel, Dilthey and Habermas. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):221-234.score: 9.0
  13. Mary L. Coolidge (1944). Purposiveness Without Purpose in a New Context. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 4 (1):85-93.score: 9.0
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  14. Philippe Huneman, Possibility, Necessity and Purposiveness: The Metaphysical Novelties in the Critique of Judgement.score: 9.0
  15. Hans Lindahl (1998). The Purposiveness of Law: Two Concepts of Representation in the European Union. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 17 (5/6):481 - 507.score: 9.0
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  16. Mary-Barbara Zeldin † (1983). Formal Purposiveness and the Continuity of Kant's Argument in the Critique of Judgment. Kant-Studien 74 (1):45-55.score: 9.0
  17. Katerina Deligiorgi (2014). The Pleasures of Contra‐Purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):25-35.score: 9.0
    Serious doubts have been raised about the coherence of theories of the sublime and the usefulness of the concept. By contrast, the sublime is increasingly studied as a key function in Kant's moral psychology and in his ethics. This article combines methodological conservatism, approaching the topic from within Kant's discussion of aesthetic judgment, with reconstruction of a conception of human agency that is tenable on Kantian grounds. I argue that a coherent theory of the sublime is possible and useful, and (...)
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  18. Edmund Noble (1914). Purposiveness in Nature and Life. The Monist 24 (2):259-283.score: 9.0
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  19. Daniel Rothbart & Irmgard Scherer (1997). Kant's Critique of Judgment and the Scientific Investigation of Matter. Hyle 3 (1):65 - 80.score: 9.0
    Kant's theory of judgment establishes the conceptual framework for understanding the subtle relationships between the experimental scientist, the modern instrument, and nature's atomic particles. The principle of purposiveness which governs judgment has also a role in implicitly guiding modern experimental science. In Part 1 we explore Kant's philosophy of science as he shows how knowledge of material nature and unobservable entities is possible. In Part 2 we examine the way in which Kant's treatment of judgment, with its operating principle (...)
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  20. John Zammito (2009). Kant's Notion of Intrinsic Purposiveness in the Critique of Judgment. Kant Yearbook 1 (1).score: 9.0
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  21. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reflective Judgment and the Application of Logic to Nature: Kant's Deduction of the Principle of Purposiveness as an Answer to Hume. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
  22. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2008). The Purposiveness of Nature: Kant and Environmental Ethics. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht Und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. 3--12.score: 9.0
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  23. Alix Cohen (2009). Purposiveness Without a Purpose. Metascience 18 (2):343-345.score: 9.0
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  24. B. Dorflinger (1991). Teleology and the Problem of Transition-a Commentary on Regulative and Reflective Uses of Purposiveness in Kant. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30:65-71.score: 9.0
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  25. Holly L. Wilson (2008). The Green Kant: Kant's Treatment of Animals. In Paul Pojman Louis Pojman (ed.), in Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application.score: 9.0
    Kant's theory of animals is based on his belief that animals have presentations and consciousness and in this are like human beings. When we abuse animals then we are more likely to abuse human beings. But animals are organic beings that have internal purposiveness and hence are ends for which other things are means. In this limited sense animals have intrinsic value.
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  26. Paul S. Agutter & Denys N. Wheatley (1999). Foundations of Biology: On the Problem of “Purpose” in Biology in Relation to Our Acceptance of the Darwinian Theory of Natural Selection. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 4 (1):3-23.score: 8.0
    For many years, biology was largely descriptive (natural history), but with its emergence as a scientific discipline in its own right, a reductionist approach began, which has failed to be matched by adequate understanding of function of cells, organisms and species as whole entities. Every effort was made to explain biological phenomena in physico-chemical terms.It is argued that there is and always has been a clear distinction between life sciences and physical sciences, explicit in the use of the word biology. (...)
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  27. Yoshimi Kawade (2009). On the Nature of the Subjectivity of Living Things. Biosemiotics 2 (2):205-220.score: 7.0
    A biosemiotic view of living things is presented that supersedes the mechanistic view of life prevalent in biology today. Living things are active agents with autonomous subjectivity, whose structure is triadic, consisting of the individual organism, its Umwelt and the society. Sociality inheres in every living thing since the very origin of life on the earth. The temporality of living things is guided by the purpose to live, which works as the semantic boundary condition for the processes of embodiment of (...)
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  28. Thaddeus Metz (2000). Could God's Purpose Be the Source of Life's Meaning? Religious Studies 36 (3):293-313.score: 6.0
    In this paper, I explore the traditional religious account of what can make a life meaningful, namely, the view that one's life acquires significance insofar as one fulfils a purpose God has assigned. Call this view ‘purpose theory’. In the literature, there are objections purporting to show that purpose theory entails the logical absurdities that God is not moral, omnipotent, or eternal. I show that there are versions of purpose theory which are not vulnerable to these reductio arguments. However, I (...)
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  29. Andreas Weber & Francisco J. Varela (2002). Life After Kant: Natural Purposes and the Autopoietic Foundations of Biological Individuality. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):97-125.score: 6.0
    This paper proposes a basic revision of the understanding of teleology in biological sciences. Since Kant, it has become customary to view purposiveness in organisms as a bias added by the observer; the recent notion of teleonomy expresses well this as-if character of natural purposes. In recent developments in science, however, notions such as self-organization (or complex systems) and the autopoiesis viewpoint, have displaced emergence and circular self-production as central features of life. Contrary to an often superficial reading, Kant (...)
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  30. William E. Lyons (1980). Emotion. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
  31. James Kreines (forthcoming). Kant and Hegel on Teleology and Life From the Perspective of Debates About Free Will. In Thomas Khurana (ed.), THE FREEDOM OF LIFE. Hegelian Perspectives. Walther König.score: 6.0
    Kant’s treatment of teleology and life in the Critique of the Power of Judgment is complicated and difficult to interpret; Hegel’s response adds considerable complexity. I propose a new way of understanding the underlying philosophical issues in this debate, allowing a better understanding of the underlying structure of the arguments in Kant and Hegel. My new way is unusual: I use for an interpretive lens some structural features of familiar debates about freedom of the will. These debates, I argue, allow (...)
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  32. Gabriele Gava (2008). The Purposefulness in Our Thought: A Kantian Aid to Understanding Some Essential Features of Peirce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (4):pp. 699-727.score: 6.0
    This paper aims to shed light on the role played by purposefulness in Peirce’s account of thought by means of a comparison with Kant’s regulative principles. Purposefulness, as an orientation toward an end involved in a thought process, is distinguished from purposiveness, as conformity to an end. Peirce’s architectonic, cosmology, and theory of natural classes are briefly analyzed in light of these concepts. Then, a comparison between Peirce’s esthetic ideal and regulative hopes and Kant’s regulative ideas and principle of (...)
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  33. William R. Stoeger (2013). Ernan McMullin on Contingency, Cosmic Purpose, and the Atemporality of the Creator. Zygon 48 (2):329-337.score: 6.0
    This article reviews, and offers supportive reflections on, the main points of Ernan McMullin's provocative 1998 article, “Cosmic Purpose and the Contingency of Human Evolution,’’ reprinted in this issue of Zygon. In it he addresses the important science-theology issue of how the Creator's purpose and intention to assure the emergence of human beings is consonant with the radical contingency of the evolutionary process. After discussing cosmic and biological evolution and critically summarizing recent solutions to this question by Keith Ward, John (...)
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  34. Andrew V. Abela (2001). Profit and More: Catholic Social Teaching and the Purpose of the Firm. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):107 - 116.score: 6.0
    The empirical findings in Collins and Porras'' study of visionary companies, Built to Last, and the normative claims about the purpose of the business firm in Centesimus Annus are found to be complementary in understanding the purpose of the business firm. A summary of the methodology and findings of Built to Lastand a short overview of Catholic Social Teaching are provided. It is shown that Centesimus Annus'' claim that the purpose of the firm is broader than just profit is consistent (...)
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  35. D. M. Walsh (2006). Organisms as Natural Purposes: The Contemporary Evolutionary Perspective. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):771-791.score: 6.0
    I argue that recent advances in developmental biology demonstrate the inadequacy of suborganismal mechanism. The category of the organism, construed as a ’natural purpose’ should play an ineliminable role in explaining ontogenetic development and adaptive evolution. According to Kant the natural purposiveness of organisms cannot be demonstrated to be an objective principle in nature, nor can purposiveness figure in genuine explain. I attempt to argue, by appeal to recent work on self-organization, that the purposiveness of organisms is (...)
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  36. Stephen Andrew Butterfill & Corrado Sinigaglia (2014). Intention and Motor Representation in Purposive Action. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):119-145.score: 6.0
    Are there distinct roles for intention and motor representation in explaining the purposiveness of action? Standard accounts of action assign a role to intention but are silent on motor representation. The temptation is to suppose that nothing need be said here because motor representation is either only an enabling condition for purposive action or else merely a variety of intention. This paper provides reasons for resisting that temptation. Some motor representations, like intentions, coordinate actions in virtue of representing outcomes; (...)
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  37. Arthur E. Falk (1981). Purpose, Feedback, and Evolution. Philosophy of Science 48 (2):198-217.score: 6.0
    This essay develops a theory of natural signs in order to show how evolutionary theory breathes new life into teleology. An argument to the contrary presented by Richard Taylor is refuted. The essay defends the view that the concept of negative feedback explicates purposiveness and that symbiotic evolution explains the occurrence of naturally adapted feedback systems. But evolution itself is not a teleological process, nor is it a negative feedback system. There is an exploration of the nature of the (...)
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  38. Danny Frederick (2012). Critique of an Argument for the Reality of Purpose. Prolegomena 11 (1):25-34.score: 6.0
    Schueler has argued, against the eliminativist, that human purposive action cannot be an illusion because the concept of purpose is not theoretical. He argues that the concept is known directly to be instantiated, through self-awareness; and that to maintain that the concept is theoretical involves an infinite regress. I show that Schueler’s argument fails because all our concepts are theoretical in the sense that we may be mistaken in applying them to our experience. As a consequence, it is conceivable that (...)
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  39. Douglas C. Long (1979). Agents, Mechanisms, and Other Minds. In Donald F. Gustafson & Bangs L. Tapscott (eds.), Body, Mind And Method. Dordrecht: Reidel. 129--148.score: 6.0
    One of the goals of physiologists who study the detailed physical, chemical,and neurological mechanisms operating within the human body is to understand the intricate causal processes which underlie human abilities and activities. It is doubtless premature to predict that they will eventually be able to explain the behaviour of a particular human being as we might now explain the behaviour of a pendulum clock or even the invisible changes occurring within the hardware of a modern electronic computer. Nonetheless, it seems (...)
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  40. Ernan McMullin (2013). Cosmic Purpose and the Contingency of Human Evolution. Zygon 48 (2):338-363.score: 6.0
    Some understand the evolutionary process as more or less predictable; others stress its contingency. I argue that both Christian evolutionists who have assumed that the purposes of the Creator can be realized only through more or less predictable processes as well as those who infer from the contingency of the evolutionary process to the lack of purpose in the universe generally, are mistaken if the Creator escapes from the limits imposed on the creature by temporality, as the traditional Augustinian account (...)
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  41. Larry Wright (1974). Mechanisms and Purposive Behavior III. Philosophy of Science 41 (4):345-360.score: 6.0
    It is commonly thought that the dispositional view of purposiveness is itself incompatible with the programmatic claims of neurophysiologists. In this paper, various versions of four arguments for this incompatibility are examined, and rejected as unsound. Central to the argument is a rough sketch of a "mechanistic" position which seems clearly compatible with a dispositional view of purposiveness.
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  42. Melissa M. Kozma & Jeanine Weekes Schroer (forthcoming). Purposeful Nonsense, Intersectionality, and the Mission to Save Black Babies. In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donavan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering & Chatto Ltd.score: 6.0
    The competing expressions of ideology flooding the contemporary political landscape have taken a turn toward the absurd. The Radiance Foundation’s recent anti-abortion campaign targeting African-American women, including a series of billboards bearing the slogan “The most dangerous place for an African-American child is in the womb”, is just one example of political "discourse" that is both infuriating and confounding. Discourse with these features – problematic intelligibility, disinterest in the truth, and inflammatory rhetoric – has become increasingly common in politics, the (...)
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  43. Howard Rosenbrock (1992). Science, Technology and Purpose. AI and Society 6 (1):3-17.score: 6.0
    In a recent book, ‘Machines with a Purpose’, many of the unattractive features of our technology were traced to a view of the world which has predominated in science for nearly four hundred years. This is, that nature, and everything that it contains, operates causally and without purpose. To counter this view, an alternative, purposive view was developed. The paper gives a simple account of this development, of other related work, and of the underlying motivation.
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  44. Robert C. Rowland (2008). Purpose, Argument Fields, and Theoretical Justification. Argumentation 22 (2):235-250.score: 6.0
    Twenty-five years ago, field theory was among the most contested issues in argumentation studies. Today, the situation is very different. In fact, field theory has almost disappeared from disciplinary debates, a development which might suggest that the concept is not a useful aspect of argumentation theory. In contrast, I argue that while field studies are rarely useful, field theory provides an essential underpinning to any close analysis of an argumentative controversy. I then argue that the conflicting approaches to argument fields (...)
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  45. Jaegwon Kim (1989). Mechanism, Purpose, and Explanatory Exclusion. Philosophical Perspectives 3:77-108.score: 5.0
  46. A. Goldman (1969). The Compatibility of Mechanism and Purpose. Philosophical Review 78 (October):468-82.score: 5.0
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  47. Nurbay Irmak (2014). Purpose-Relativity and Ontology. Dissertation, University of Miamiscore: 5.0
  48. Daniel Silva Graça (2004). Some Recent Developments on Shannon's General Purpose Analog Computer. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 50 (4‐5):473-485.score: 5.0
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  49. John Schneider (2012). The Fall of “Augustinian Adam”: Original Fragility and Supralapsarian Purpose. Zygon 47 (4):949-969.score: 4.0
    The essay is framed by conflict between Christianity and Darwinian science over the history of the world and the nature of human personhood. Evolutionary science narrates a long prehuman geological and biological history filled with vast amounts, kinds, and distributions of apparently random brutal and pointless suffering. It also strongly suggests that the first modern humans were morally primitive. This science seems to discredit Christianity's common meta-narrative of the Fall, understood as a story of Paradise Lost. The author contends that (...)
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  50. Carl Gillett (2002). The Varieties of Emergence: Their Purposes, Obligations and Importance. Grazer Philosophische Studien 65 (1):95-121.score: 4.0
    I outline reasons for the recent popularity, and lingering suspicion, about 'emergence' by examining three distinct concepts of property emergence, their purposes and associated obligations. In Part 1, I argue 'Strong' emergence is the grail for many emergentists (and physicalists), since it frames what is needed to block the 'Argument from Realization' (AR) which moves from the truth of physicalism to the inefficacy of special science properties. I then distinguish 'Weak' and 'Ontological' emergence, in Part 2, arguing each is a (...)
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