Search results for 'Quantum theory History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Friedrich Hund (1974). The History of Quantum Theory. New York,Barnes & Noble Books.
  2. Dieter Hoffmann, J. Lemmerich & Ann Hentschel (eds.) (2000). Quantum Theory Centenary: The Pre- and Early History. Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.
  3.  15
    Thomas Pashby (forthcoming). Time and Quantum Theory: A History and A Prospectus. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics.
    In this paper I am concerned with analyzing in detail how ideas and expectations regarding the role of time in quantum theory arose and evolved in the early years of quantum mechanics (from 1925-27). The general theme is that expectations which seemed reasonable from the point of view of matrix mechanics and Dirac's q-number formalism became implausible in light of Dirac-Jordan transformation theory, and were dashed by von Neumann's Hilbert space formalism which came to replace it. (...)
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  4.  61
    Don Robinson (1994). The History and Philosophy of Quantum Field Theory. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:61 - 68.
    This paper is intended to be an introductory survey of subjects related to the problems dealt with in the three other papers in this symposium on quantum field theory. A brief history of quantum electrodynamics is given and some of the objections to it are stated. A brief history of quantum field theories from the 1970's to the present is then provided. Finally, a sketch of some of the philosophical work that has been done (...)
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  5.  24
    D. Bohm (1971). Quantum Theory as an Indication of a New Order in Physics. Part A. The Development of New Orders as Shown Through the History of Physics. Foundations of Physics 1 (4):359-381.
    In this paper, we discuss the general significance of order in physics, as a first step toward the development of new notions of order. We begin with a brief historical discussion of the notions of order underlying ancient Greek views, and then go on to show how these changed in key ways with the rise of classical physics. This leads to a broader view of the significance of order, which helps to indicate what is to be meant by a change (...)
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  6.  14
    Paul Busch & Pekka J. Lahti (1996). The Standard Model of Quantum Measurement Theory: History and Applications. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 26 (7):875-893.
    The standard model of the quantum theory of measurement is based on an interaction Hamiltonian in which the observable to be measured is multiplied by some observable of a probe system. This simple Ansatz has proved extremely fruitful in the development of the foundations of quantum mechanics. While the ensuing type of models has often been argued to be rather artificial, recent advances in quantum optics have demonstrated their principal and practical feasibility. A brief historical (...)
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  7.  1
    Allan Franklin (1994). From C-Numbers to Q-Numbers: The Classical Analogy in the History of Quantum Theory by Olivier Darrigol. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 85:546-547.
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  8. Jon Dorling (1975). The History of Quantum Theory. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 8 (2):188-189.
  9. Thomas Pashby (2015). Time and Quantum Theory: A History and a Prospectus. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 52:24-38.
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  10. O. Darrigol & A. J. Kox (1995). From C-Numbers to Q-Numbers: The Classical Analogy in the History of Quantum Theory. Annals of Science 52 (2):206-206.
     
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  11.  4
    Werner Heisenberg (1973). Development of Concepts in the History of Quantum Theory. In Jagdish Mehra (ed.), The Physicist's Conception of Nature. Boston,Reidel 264--275.
  12.  39
    Edward MacKinnon (1995). Book Review:From C-Numbers to Q-Numbers: The Classical History of Quantum Theory Olivier Darrigol. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 62 (2):348-350.
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  13.  20
    Werner Heisenberg, The History of Quantum Theory.
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  14.  1
    Helge Kragh (1992). A Sense of History: History of Science and the Teaching of Introductory Quantum Theory. Science and Education 1 (4):349-363.
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  15.  5
    Wobbe de Vos (2000). Chicago Press, 1977), and Black-Body Theory and the Quantum Disconti-Nuity: 1894-1912 (Oxford University Press, 1978). Howard Sankey is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Science in the Depart-Ment of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Melbourne. He Studied Philosophy as an Undergraduate at the University of Otago. [REVIEW] Science and Education 9:215-218.
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  16.  12
    Guido Bacciagaluppi (2009). Quantum Theory at the Crossroads: Reconsidering the 1927 Solvay Conference. Cambridge University Press.
    The 1927 Solvay conference was perhaps the most important meeting in the history of quantum theory. Contrary to popular belief, the interpretation of quantum theory was not settled at this conference, and no consensus was reached. Instead, a range of sharply conflicting views were presented and extensively discussed, including de Broglie's pilot-wave theory, Born and Heisenberg's quantum mechanics, and Schrödinger's wave mechanics. Today, there is no longer an established or dominant interpretation of (...) theory, so it is important to re-evaluate the historical sources and keep the interpretation debate open. This book contains a complete translation of the original proceedings, with background essays on the three main interpretations of quantum theory presented at the conference, and an extensive analysis of the lectures and discussions in the light of current research in the foundations of quantum theory. The proceedings contain much unexpected material, including extensive discussions of de Broglie's pilot-wave theory (which de Broglie presented for a many-body system), and a theory of 'quantum mechanics' apparently lacking in wave function collapse or fundamental time evolution. This book will be of interest to graduate students and researchers in physics and in the history and philosophy of quantum theory. (shrink)
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  17.  11
    Wolfgang Yourgrau (1968). Variational Principles in Dynamics and Quantum Theory. Philadelphia, Saunders.
    Concentrating upon applications that are most relevant to modern physics, this valuable book surveys variational principles and examines their relationship to dynamics and quantum theory. Stressing the history and theory of these mathematical concepts rather than the mechanics, the authors provide many insights into the development of quantum mechanics and present much hard-to-find material in a remarkably lucid, compact form. After summarizing the historical background from Pythagoras to Francis Bacon, Professors Yourgrau and Mandelstram cover Fermat's (...)
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  18.  25
    J. E. Baggott (2011). The Quantum Story: A History in 40 Moments. Oxford University Press.
    Prologue: Stormclouds : London, April 1900 -- Quantum of action: The most strenuous work of my life : Berlin, December 1900 ; Annus Mirabilis : Bern, March 1905 ; A little bit of reality : Manchester, April 1913 ; la Comédie Française : Paris, September 1923 ; A strangely beautiful interior : Helgoland, June 1925 ; The self-rotating electron : Leiden, November 1925 ; A late erotic outburst : Swiss Alps, Christmas 1925 -- Quantum interpretation: Ghost field : (...)
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  19. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are two of the most successful scientific theories ever discovered, and yet how they can describe the same world is far from clear: one theory is deterministic, the other indeterministic; one theory describes a world in which chaos is pervasive, the other a world in which chaos is absent. Focusing on the exciting field of 'quantum chaos', this book reveals that there is a subtle and complex relation between classical and (...) mechanics. It challenges the received view that classical and quantum mechanics are incommensurable, and revives another, largely forgotten tradition due to Niels Bohr and Paul Dirac. By artfully weaving together considerations from the history of science, philosophy of science, and contemporary physics, this book offers a new way of thinking about intertheory relations and scientific explanation. It will be of particular interest to historians and philosophers of science, philosophically-inclined physicists, and interested non-specialists. (shrink)
     
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  20.  90
    Olival Freire (2009). Quantum Dissidents: Research on the Foundations of Quantum Theory Circa 1970. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (4):280-289.
    This paper makes a collective biographical profile of a sample of physicists who were protagonists in the research on the foundations of quantum physics circa 1970. We study the cases of Zeh, Bell, Clauser, Shimony, Wigner, Rosenfeld, d’Espagnat, Selleri, and DeWitt, analyzing their training and early career, achievements, qualms with quantum mechanics, motivations for such research, professional obstacles, attitude towards the Copenhagen interpretation, and success and failures. Except for Rosenfeld, they were all dissidents, fighting against the dominant attitude (...)
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  21. Amit Hagar (2010). Review of Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent, David Wallace (Eds.), Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).
    Hugh Everett III died of a heart attack in July 1982 at the age of 51. Almost 26 years later, a New York Times obituary for his PhD advisor, John Wheeler, mentioned him and Richard Feynman as Wheeler’s most prominent students. Everett’s PhD thesis on the relative state formulation of quantum mechanics, later known as the “Many Worlds Interpretation”, was published (in its edited form) in 1957, and later (in its original, unedited form) in 1973, and since then has (...)
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  22.  1
    Jean‐Marc Lévy‐Leblond (1976). Towards a Proper Quantum Theory (Hints for a Recasting). Dialectica 30 (2‐3):161-192.
    SummaryThe history of quantum physics has been deeply conditioned by the change in scientific practice as a social activity during the past fifty years. As a result the theory has not been allowed full maturing; both its formal and empirical advances have not resulted in a comparable conceptual progress. The recasting of quantum theory thus appears as an epistemological necessity. One of the main aspects of this process is to clear quantum theory from (...)
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  23.  63
    Alan Forrester (2007). Decision Theory and Information Propagation in Quantum Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (4):815-831.
    In recent papers, Zurek [(2005). Probabilities from entanglement, Born's rule pk=|ψk|2 from entanglement. Physical Review A, 71, 052105] has objected to the decision-theoretic approach of Deutsch [(1999) Quantum theory of probability and decisions. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 455, 3129–3137] and Wallace [(2003). Everettian rationality: defending Deutsch's approach to probability in the Everett interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics, 34, 415–438] to deriving the Born rule for quantum probabilities on the (...)
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  24.  19
    Matthew J. Donald, On Many-Minds Interpretations of Quantum Theory.
    This paper is a response to some recent discussions of many-minds interpretations in the philosophical literature. After an introduction to the many-minds idea, the complexity of quantum states for macroscopic objects is stressed. Then it is proposed that a characterization of the physical structure of observers is a proper goal for physical theory. It is argued that an observer cannot be defined merely by the instantaneous structure of a brain, but that the history of the brain's functioning (...)
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  25.  20
    Christopher Norris (1999). Should Philosophers Take Lessons From Quantum Theory? Inquiry 42 (3 & 4):311 – 342.
    This essay examines some of the arguments in David Deutsch's book The Fabric of Reality , chief among them its case for the so-called many-universe interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM), presented as the only physically and logically consistent solution to the QM paradoxes of wave/particle dualism, remote simultaneous interaction, the observer-induced 'collapse of the wave-packet', etc. The hypothesis assumes that all possible outcomes are realized in every such momentary 'collapse', since the observer splits off into so many parallel, coexisting, (...)
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  26.  32
    Alisa Bokulich (2015). A. Douglas Stone. Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):177-79.
    While everyone knows of Einstein’s brilliant work on relativity theory and many know of his later opposition to quantum theory as immortalized in his remark “He [God] does not play dice,” few outside of limited academic circles know of Einstein’s many seminal contributions to the development of quantum theory. In this highly accessible and enjoyable popular science book, Douglas Stone seeks to revise our popular conception of Einstein and bring the story of his profound (...)
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  27.  11
    Joshua Rosaler (forthcoming). Interpretation Neutrality in the Classical Domain of Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics.
    I show explicitly how concerns about wave function collapse and ontology can be decoupled from the bulk of technical analysis necessary to recover localized, approximately Newtonian trajectories from quantum theory. In doing so, I demonstrate that the account of classical behavior provided by decoherence theory can be straightforwardly tailored to give accounts of classical behavior on multiple interpretations of quantum theory, including the Everett, de Broglie-Bohm and GRW interpretations. I further show that this interpretation-neutral, decoherence-based (...)
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  28.  25
    Koray Karaca (2013). The Strong and Weak Senses of Theory-Ladenness of Experimentation: Theory-Driven Versus Exploratory Experiments in the History of High-Energy Particle Physics. Science in Context 26 (1):93-136.
    In the theory-dominated view of scientific experimentation, all relations of theory and experiment are taken on a par; namely, that experiments are performed solely to ascertain the conclusions of scientific theories. As a result, different aspects of experimentation and of the relation of theory to experiment remain undifferentiated. This in turn fosters a notion of theory-ladenness of experimentation that is too coarse-grained to accurately describe the relations of theory and experiment in scientific practice. By contrast, (...)
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  29.  29
    R. M. Nugayev (1985). The History of Quantum Mechanics as a Decisive Argument Favoring Einstein Over Lorentz. Philosophy of Science 52 (1):44-63.
    PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE, vol. 52, number 1, pp.44-63. R.M. Nugayev, Kazan State |University, USSR. -/- THE HISTORY OF QUANTUM THEORY AS A DECISIVE ARGUMENT FAVORING EINSTEIN OVER LJRENTZ. -/- Abstract. Einstein’s papers on relativity, quantum theory and statistical mechanics were all part of a single research programme ; the aim was to unify mechanics and electrodynamics. It was this broader program – which eventually split into relativistic physics and quantummmechanics – that superseded Lorentz’s theory. (...)
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  30.  70
    Henry P. Stapp, Relativistic Whiteheadian Quantum Field Theory: Serial Order and Creative Advance.
    Alfred North Whitehead in his book Process and Reality describes the history of the universe in terms of a process of ‘creative advance into novelty.’ This advance is produced by a collection of happenings called ‘actual occasions’, or ‘actual entities’. Each actual entity has an associated actual world, and it arises from its own peculiar actual world. (PR 284). Two occasions are termed ‘contemporary’ if neither lies in the actual world of the other. A key issue is whether the (...)
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  31.  6
    Federico Laudisa (2000). On Time Asymmetry and History in an Everett Quantum World. Foundations of Physics 30 (9):1525-1538.
    It is usually held that the standard collapse model of a quantum measurement process grounds a kind of fundamental time asymmetry. The question whether and how it should be possible to reconstruct uniquely one's own history in an Everett no-collapse interpretation of quantum theory is investigated. A particular approach to the Everett interpretation, due to John S. Bell, is considered, according to which one of the chief claims of the Everett quantum theory is precisely (...)
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  32.  18
    Kent A. Peacock (2008). The Quantum Revolution: A Historical Perspective. Greenwood Press.
    The twilight of certainty -- Einstein and light -- The Bohr atom and old quantum theory -- Uncertain synthesis -- Dualities -- Elements of physical reality -- Creation and annihilation -- Quantum mechanics goes to work -- Symmetries and resonances -- "The most profound discovery of science" -- Bits, qubits, and the ultimate computer -- Unfinished. business.
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  33.  69
    Gareth Ernest Boardman (2013). Addressing the Conflict Between Relativity and Quantum Theory: Models, Measurement and the Markov Property. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):86-115.
    Twenty-first century science faces a dilemma. Two of its well-verified foundation stones - relativity and quantum theory - have proven inconsistent. Resolution of the conflict has resisted improvements in experimental precision leaving some to believe that some fundamental understanding in our world-view may need modification or even radical reform. Employment of the wave-front model of electrodynamics, as a propagation process with a Markov property, may offer just such a clarification.
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  34.  54
    Bert Schroer (2010). Localization and the Interface Between Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory and Quantum Gravity I. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (2):104-127.
    It is shown that there are significant conceptual differences between QM and QFT which make it difficult to view the latter as just a relativistic extension of the principles of QM. At the root of this is a fundamental distiction between Born-localization in QM (which in the relativistic context changes its name to Newton–Wigner localization) and modular localization which is the localization underlying QFT, after one separates it from its standard presentation in terms of field coordinates. The first comes with (...)
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  35.  29
    Suman Seth (2008). Crafting the Quantum: Arnold Sommerfeld and the Older Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):335-348.
    Arnold Sommerfeld was among the most important students of the so-called ‘older’ quantum theory. His many contributions included papers in 1915 and 1916 extending Niels Bohr’s ‘planetary’ model of the atom beyond circular orbits and his incorporation of relativistic corrections in order to explain hydrogenic fine structure. Originally a realist in his use of Bohr’s model, Sommerfeld became increasingly disillusioned with model-building in general in the late nineteen-teens and early nineteen-twenties. This paper explores Sommerfeld’s use of the term (...)
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  36.  45
    Bert Schroer (2010). Localization and the Interface Between Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory and Quantum Gravity II. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (4):293-308.
    The main topics of this second part of a two-part essay are some consequences of the phenomenon of vacuum polarization as the most important physical manifestation of modular localization. Besides philosophically unexpected consequences, it has led to a new constructive “outside-inwards approach” in which the pointlike fields and the compactly localized operator algebras which they generate only appear from intersecting much simpler algebras localized in noncompact wedge regions whose generators have extremely mild almost free field behavior. -/- Another consequence of (...)
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  37.  26
    Shahin Kaveh (2014). The Incongruent Correspondence: Seven Non-Classical Years of Old Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (2):239-246.
    The Correspondence Principle of old quantum theory is commonly considered to be the requirement that quantum and classical theories converge in their empirical predictions in the appropriate asymptotic limit. That perception has persisted despite the fact that Bohr and other early proponents of CP clearly did not intend it as a mere requirement, and despite much recent historical work. In this paper, I build on this work by first giving an explicit formulation to the mentioned asymptotic requirement (...)
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  38.  30
    E. R. (1999). Time-Symmetrised Quantum Theory, Counterfactuals and 'Advanced Action'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 30 (2):237-259.
    Recent authors have raised objections to the counterfactual interpretation of the Aharonov-Bergmann-Lebowitz rule of time-symmetrised quantum theory. I distinguish between two different readings of the ABL rule, counterfactual and non-counterfactual, and confirm that TSQT advocate L. Vaidman is employing the counterfactual reading to which these authors object. Vaidman has responded to the objections by proposing a new kind of time-symmetrised counterfactual, which he has defined in two different ways. It is argued that neither definition succeeds in overcoming the (...)
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  39.  20
    L. Hardy (2003). Probability Theories in General and Quantum Theory in Particular. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (3):381-393.
    We consider probability theories in general. In the first part of the paper, various constraints are imposed and classical probability and quantum theory are recovered as special cases. Quantum theory follows from a set of five reasonable axioms. The key axiom which gives us quantum theory rather than classical probability theory is the continuity axiom, which demands that there exists a continuous reversible transformation between any pair of pure states. In the second part (...)
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  40.  79
    David Bohm (1993). The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Routledge.
    In the The Undivided Universe, David Bohn and Basil Hiley present a radically different approach to quantum theory.
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  41. Max Jammer (1974). The Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. New York,Wiley.
  42.  60
    Arthur Fine (1996). The Shaky Game: Einstein, Realism, and the Quantum Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    In this new edition, Arthur Fine looks at Einstein's philosophy of science and develops his own views on realism. A new Afterword discusses the reaction to Fine's own theory. "What really led Einstein . . . to renounce the new quantum order? For those interested in this question, this book is compulsory reading."--Harvey R. Brown, American Journal of Physics "Fine has successfully combined a historical account of Einstein's philosophical views on quantum mechanics and a discussion of some (...)
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  43.  79
    Henk W. de Regt (1997). Erwin Schrödinger, Anschaulichkeit, and Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 28 (4):461-481.
    Early in 1926 Erwin Schrodinger presented his famous theory of wave mechanics to account for atomic phenomena. It is often assumed that Schrodinger’s work reflected a realist philosophy. In this article, I will argue that this assumption is incorrect.
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  44.  85
    Fred Kronz (2008). Non-Monotonic Probability Theory for N-State Quantum Systems. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (2):259-272.
    In previous work, a non-standard theory of probability was formulated and used to systematize interference effects involving the simplest type of quantum systems. The main result here is a self-contained, non-trivial generalization of that theory to capture interference effects involving a much broader range of quantum systems. The discussion also focuses on interpretive matters having to do with the actual/virtual distinction, non-locality, and conditional probabilities.
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  45. Manjit Kumar (2009). Quantum: Einstein, Bohr, and the Great Debate About the Nature of Reality. Hachette India.
    The reluctant revolutionary -- The patent slave -- The golden Dane -- The quantum atom -- When Einstein met Bohr -- The prince of duality -- Spin doctors -- The quantum magician -- A late erotic outburst -- Uncertainty in Copenhagen -- Solvay 1927 -- Einstein forgets relativity -- Quantum reality -- For whom Bell's theorem tolls -- The quantum demon.
     
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  46.  40
    David Wallace (2011). Taking Particle Physics Seriously: A Critique of the Algebraic Approach to Quantum Field Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (2):116-125.
    I argue against the currently prevalent view that algebraic quantum field theory (AQFT) is the correct framework for philosophy of quantum field theory and that “conventional” quantum field theory (CQFT), of the sort used in mainstream particle physics, is not suitable for foundational study. In doing so, I defend that position that AQFT and CQFT should be understood as rival programs to resolve the mathematical and physical pathologies of renormalization theory, and that CQFT (...)
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  47.  69
    Doreen Fraser (2011). How to Take Particle Physics Seriously: A Further Defence of Axiomatic Quantum Field Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (2):126-135.
    Further arguments are offered in defence of the position that the variant of quantum field theory (QFT) that should be subject to interpretation and foundational analysis is axiomatic quantum field theory. I argue that the successful application of renormalization group (RG) methods within alternative formulations of QFT illuminates the empirical content of QFT, but not the theoretical content. RG methods corroborate the point of view that QFT is a case of the underdetermination of theory by (...)
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  48.  77
    Rob Clifton & Hans Halvorson (2001). Entanglement and Open Systems in Algebraic Quantum Field Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (1):1-31.
    Entanglement has long been the subject of discussion by philosophers of quantum theory, and has recently come to play an essential role for physicists in their development of quantum information theory. In this paper we show how the formalism of algebraic quantum field theory (AQFT) provides a rigorous framework within which to analyse entanglement in the context of a fully relativistic formulation of quantum theory. What emerges from the analysis are new practical (...)
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  49.  14
    Christian Forstner (2008). The Early History of David Bohm's Quantum Mechanics Through the Perspective of Ludwik Fleck's Thought-Collectives. Minerva 46 (2):215-229.
    This paper analyses the early history of David Bohm’s mechanics from the perspective of Ludwik Fleck’s thought-collectives and shows how the thought-style of the scientific community limits the possible modes of thinking and what new possibilities for the construction of a new theory arise if these limits are removed.
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  50.  54
    Karl R. Popper (1992). Quantum Theory and the Schism in Physics. Routledge.
    The basic theme of Popper's philosophy--that something can come from nothing--is related to the present situation in physical theory. Popper carries his investigation right to the center of current debate in quantum physics. He proposes an interpretation of physics--and indeed an entire cosmology--which is realist, conjectural, deductivist and objectivist, anti-positivist, and anti-instrumentalist. He stresses understanding, reminding us that our ignorance grows faster than our conjectural knowledge.
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