Search results for 'Quantum theory History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Friedrich Hund (1974). The History of Quantum Theory. New York,Barnes & Noble Books.score: 441.0
     
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  2. Don Robinson (1994). The History and Philosophy of Quantum Field Theory. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:61 - 68.score: 324.0
    This paper is intended to be an introductory survey of subjects related to the problems dealt with in the three other papers in this symposium on quantum field theory. A brief history of quantum electrodynamics is given and some of the objections to it are stated. A brief history of quantum field theories from the 1970's to the present is then provided. Finally, a sketch of some of the philosophical work that has been done (...)
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  3. Paul Busch & Pekka J. Lahti (1996). The Standard Model of Quantum Measurement Theory: History and Applications. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 26 (7):875-893.score: 303.0
    The standard model of the quantum theory of measurement is based on an interaction Hamiltonian in which the observable to be measured is multiplied by some observable of a probe system. This simple Ansatz has proved extremely fruitful in the development of the foundations of quantum mechanics. While the ensuing type of models has often been argued to be rather artificial, recent advances in quantum optics have demonstrated their principal and practical feasibility. A brief historical review (...)
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  4. D. Bohm (1971). Quantum Theory as an Indication of a New Order in Physics. Part A. The Development of New Orders as Shown Through the History of Physics. Foundations of Physics 1 (4):359-381.score: 303.0
    In this paper, we discuss the general significance of order in physics, as a first step toward the development of new notions of order. We begin with a brief historical discussion of the notions of order underlying ancient Greek views, and then go on to show how these changed in key ways with the rise of classical physics. This leads to a broader view of the significance of order, which helps to indicate what is to be meant by a change (...)
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  5. J. E. Baggott (2011). The Quantum Story: A History in 40 Moments. Oxford University Press.score: 297.0
    Prologue: Stormclouds : London, April 1900 -- Quantum of action: The most strenuous work of my life : Berlin, December 1900 ; Annus Mirabilis : Bern, March 1905 ; A little bit of reality : Manchester, April 1913 ; la Comédie Française : Paris, September 1923 ; A strangely beautiful interior : Helgoland, June 1925 ; The self-rotating electron : Leiden, November 1925 ; A late erotic outburst : Swiss Alps, Christmas 1925 -- Quantum interpretation: Ghost field : (...)
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  6. Guido Bacciagaluppi (2009). Quantum Theory at the Crossroads: Reconsidering the 1927 Solvay Conference. Cambridge University Press.score: 297.0
    This book will be of interest to graduate students and researchers in physics and in the history and philosophy of quantum theory.
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  7. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism. Cambridge University Press.score: 288.0
    Classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are two of the most successful scientific theories ever discovered, and yet how they can describe the same world is far from clear: one theory is deterministic, the other indeterministic; one theory describes a world in which chaos is pervasive, the other a world in which chaos is absent. Focusing on the exciting field of 'quantum chaos', this book reveals that there is a subtle and complex relation between classical and (...) mechanics. It challenges the received view that classical and quantum mechanics are incommensurable, and revives another, largely forgotten tradition due to Niels Bohr and Paul Dirac. By artfully weaving together considerations from the history of science, philosophy of science, and contemporary physics, this book offers a new way of thinking about intertheory relations and scientific explanation. It will be of particular interest to historians and philosophers of science, philosophically-inclined physicists, and interested non-specialists. (shrink)
     
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  8. Edward MacKinnon (1995). Book Review:From C-Numbers to Q-Numbers: The Classical History of Quantum Theory Olivier Darrigol. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 62 (2):348-350.score: 261.0
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  9. Werner Heisenberg (1973). Development of Concepts in the History of Quantum Theory. In. In Jagdish Mehra (ed.), The Physicist's Conception of Nature. Boston,Reidel. 264--275.score: 261.0
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  10. Helge Kragh (1992). A Sense of History: History of Science and the Teaching of Introductory Quantum Theory. Science and Education 1 (4):349-363.score: 261.0
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  11. O. Darrigol & A. J. Kox (1995). From C-Numbers to Q-Numbers: The Classical Analogy in the History of Quantum Theory. Annals of Science 52 (2):206-206.score: 261.0
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  12. Kent A. Peacock (2008). The Quantum Revolution: A Historical Perspective. Greenwood Press.score: 249.0
    The twilight of certainty -- Einstein and light -- The Bohr atom and old quantum theory -- Uncertain synthesis -- Dualities -- Elements of physical reality -- Creation and annihilation -- Quantum mechanics goes to work -- Symmetries and resonances -- "The most profound discovery of science" -- Bits, qubits, and the ultimate computer -- Unfinished. business.
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  13. Wobbe de Vos (2000). Chicago Press, 1977), and Black-Body Theory and the Quantum Disconti-Nuity: 1894-1912 (Oxford University Press, 1978). Howard Sankey is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Science in the Depart-Ment of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Melbourne. He Studied Philosophy as an Undergraduate at the University of Otago. [REVIEW] Science and Education 9:215-218.score: 243.0
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  14. Amit Hagar (2014). Discrete or Continuous? The Quest for Fundamental Length in Modern Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 225.0
    A book on the notion of fundamental length, covering issues in the philosophy of math, metaphysics, and the history and the philosophy of modern physics, from classical electrodynamics to current theories of quantum gravity. Published (2014) in Cambridge University Press.
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  15. Alan Forrester (2007). Decision Theory and Information Propagation in Quantum Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (4):815-831.score: 222.0
    In recent papers, Zurek [(2005). Probabilities from entanglement, Born's rule pk=|ψk|2 from entanglement. Physical Review A, 71, 052105] has objected to the decision-theoretic approach of Deutsch [(1999) Quantum theory of probability and decisions. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 455, 3129–3137] and Wallace [(2003). Everettian rationality: defending Deutsch's approach to probability in the Everett interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics, 34, 415–438] to deriving the Born rule for quantum probabilities on the (...)
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  16. Michel Bitbol (1996). Schrödinger's Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 216.0
    This book gives a comprehensive account of Schrödinger's successive interpretations of quantum mechanics, culminating in their final synthesis in the 1950s. Schrödinger's original position in the realism-anti-realism debate is analyzed. His views on the wave-corpuscle issue are contrasted with Bohr's, and his conceptions of the measurement problem are systematically compared with current no-collapse interpretations.
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  17. Jeroen van Dongen (2010). Einstein's Unification. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    Why did Einstein tirelessly study unified field theory for more than 30 years? In this book, the author argues that Einstein believed he could find a unified theory of all of nature's forces by repeating the methods he used when he formulated general relativity. The book discusses Einstein's route to the general theory of relativity, focusing on the philosophical lessons that he learnt. It then addresses his quest for a unified theory for electromagnetism and gravity, discussing (...)
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  18. Paul M. Clark (ed.) (1981). Modern Physics and Problems of Knowledge. Open University Press.score: 216.0
    Einstein, philosophical belief and physical theory -- Introduction to quantum theory -- Quantum theory, the Bohr-Einstein debate -- Physics and society.
     
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  19. Manjit Kumar (2009). Quantum: Einstein, Bohr, and the Great Debate About the Nature of Reality. Hachette India.score: 216.0
    The reluctant revolutionary -- The patent slave -- The golden Dane -- The quantum atom -- When Einstein met Bohr -- The prince of duality -- Spin doctors -- The quantum magician -- A late erotic outburst -- Uncertainty in Copenhagen -- Solvay 1927 -- Einstein forgets relativity -- Quantum reality -- For whom Bell's theorem tolls -- The quantum demon.
     
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  20. Amit Hagar (2010). Review of Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent, David Wallace (Eds.), Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).score: 213.0
    Hugh Everett III died of a heart attack in July 1982 at the age of 51. Almost 26 years later, a New York Times obituary for his PhD advisor, John Wheeler, mentioned him and Richard Feynman as Wheeler’s most prominent students. Everett’s PhD thesis on the relative state formulation of quantum mechanics, later known as the “Many Worlds Interpretation”, was published (in its edited form) in 1957, and later (in its original, unedited form) in 1973, and since then has (...)
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  21. Christopher Norris (1999). Should Philosophers Take Lessons From Quantum Theory? Inquiry 42 (3 & 4):311 – 342.score: 207.0
    This essay examines some of the arguments in David Deutsch's book The Fabric of Reality , chief among them its case for the so-called many-universe interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM), presented as the only physically and logically consistent solution to the QM paradoxes of wave/particle dualism, remote simultaneous interaction, the observer-induced 'collapse of the wave-packet', etc. The hypothesis assumes that all possible outcomes are realized in every such momentary 'collapse', since the observer splits off into so many parallel, coexisting, (...)
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  22. David Wick (1995). The Infamous Boundary: Seven Decades of Controversy in Quantum Physics. Birkhauser.score: 207.0
    The author of this book has traced the major lines of argument over those years in a most engaging style with clear descriptions of the concepts and ideas.
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  23. Matthew J. Donald, On Many-Minds Interpretations of Quantum Theory.score: 207.0
    This paper is a response to some recent discussions of many-minds interpretations in the philosophical literature. After an introduction to the many-minds idea, the complexity of quantum states for macroscopic objects is stressed. Then it is proposed that a characterization of the physical structure of observers is a proper goal for physical theory. It is argued that an observer cannot be defined merely by the instantaneous structure of a brain, but that the history of the brain's functioning (...)
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  24. Fannie Huang (ed.) (2006). Quantum Physics: An Anthology of Current Thought. Rosen Pub. Group.score: 207.0
    Introduction The digital age has revolutionized the way we think, communicate, work, and enjoy life. Technology has increased the pace of life at an ...
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  25. John R. Gribbin (1984). In Search of Schrödinger's Cat: Quantum Physics and Reality. Bantam Books.score: 207.0
     
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  26. John R. Gribbin (1984). In Search of Schrödinger's Cat: The Startling World of Quantum Physics Explained. Wildwood House.score: 207.0
     
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  27. Max Jammer (1974). The Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. New York,Wiley.score: 207.0
  28. Katherine Russell Sopka (1980). Quantum Physics in America, 1920-1935. Arno Press.score: 207.0
  29. Virginia Parrott Williams (1987). Surrealism, Quantum Philosophy, and World War I. Garland.score: 201.0
  30. Michel Bitbol (2011). The Quantum Structure of Knowledge. Axiomathes 21 (2):357-371.score: 198.0
    This paper analyzes how conflicts of perspective are resolved in the field of the human sciences. Examples of such conflicts are the duality between the actor and spectator standpoints, or the duality of participancy between a form of social life and a socio-anthropological study of it. This type of duality look irreducible, because the conflicting positions express incompatible interests. Yet, the claim of incommensurability is excessive. There exists a level of mental activity at which dialogue and resolution are possible. Reaching (...)
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  31. Ruth Kastner (2004). Weak Values and Consistent Histories in Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (1):57-71.score: 198.0
    ABSTRACT: A relation is obtained between weak values of quantum observables and the consistency criterion for histories of quantum events. It is shown that ``strange'' weak values for projection operators (such as values less than zero) always correspond to inconsistent families of histories. It is argued that using the ABL rule to obtain probabilities for counterfactual measurements corresponding to those strange weak values gives inconsistent results. This problem is shown to be remedied by using the conditional weight, or (...)
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  32. Henry P. Stapp, Relativistic Whiteheadian Quantum Field Theory: Serial Order and Creative Advance.score: 195.0
    Alfred North Whitehead in his book Process and Reality describes the history of the universe in terms of a process of ‘creative advance into novelty.’ This advance is produced by a collection of happenings called ‘actual occasions’, or ‘actual entities’. Each actual entity has an associated actual world, and it arises from its own peculiar actual world. (PR 284). Two occasions are termed ‘contemporary’ if neither lies in the actual world of the other. A key issue is whether the (...)
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  33. R. M. Nugayev (1985). The History of Quantum Mechanics as a Decisive Argument Favoring Einstein Over Lorentz. Philosophy of Science 52 (1):44-63.score: 195.0
    PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE, vol. 52, number 1, pp.44-63. R.M. Nugayev, Kazan State |University, USSR. -/- THE HISTORY OF QUANTUM THEORY AS A DECISIVE ARGUMENT FAVORING EINSTEIN OVER LJRENTZ. -/- Abstract. Einstein’s papers on relativity, quantum theory and statistical mechanics were all part of a single research programme ; the aim was to unify mechanics and electrodynamics. It was this broader program – which eventually split into relativistic physics and quantummmechanics – that superseded Lorentz’s theory. (...)
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  34. Federico Laudisa (2000). On Time Asymmetry and History in an Everett Quantum World. Foundations of Physics 30 (9):1525-1538.score: 195.0
    It is usually held that the standard collapse model of a quantum measurement process grounds a kind of fundamental time asymmetry. The question whether and how it should be possible to reconstruct uniquely one's own history in an Everett no-collapse interpretation of quantum theory is investigated. A particular approach to the Everett interpretation, due to John S. Bell, is considered, according to which one of the chief claims of the Everett quantum theory is precisely (...)
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  35. Christopher Norris (2000). Quantum Nonlocality and the Challenge to Scientific Realism. Foundations of Science 5 (1):3-45.score: 192.0
    In this essay I examine various aspects of the nearcentury-long debate concerning the conceptualfoundations of quantum mechanics and the problems ithas posed for physicists and philosophers fromEinstein to the present. Most crucial here is theissue of realism and the question whether quantumtheory is compatible with any kind of realist orcausal-explanatory account which goes beyond theempirical-predictive data. This was Einstein's chiefconcern in the famous series of exchanges with NielsBohr when he refused to accept the truth orcompleteness of a doctrine (orthodox (...)
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  36. Bert Schroer (2010). Localization and the Interface Between Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory and Quantum Gravity I. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (2):104-127.score: 189.0
    It is shown that there are significant conceptual differences between QM and QFT which make it difficult to view the latter as just a relativistic extension of the principles of QM. At the root of this is a fundamental distiction between Born-localization in QM (which in the relativistic context changes its name to Newton–Wigner localization) and modular localization which is the localization underlying QFT, after one separates it from its standard presentation in terms of field coordinates. The first comes with (...)
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  37. Bert Schroer (2010). Localization and the Interface Between Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory and Quantum Gravity II. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (4):293-308.score: 189.0
    The main topics of this second part of a two-part essay are some consequences of the phenomenon of vacuum polarization as the most important physical manifestation of modular localization. Besides philosophically unexpected consequences, it has led to a new constructive “outside-inwards approach” in which the pointlike fields and the compactly localized operator algebras which they generate only appear from intersecting much simpler algebras localized in noncompact wedge regions whose generators have extremely mild almost free field behavior. -/- Another consequence of (...)
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  38. Slobodan Perovic (2008). Why Were Two Theories (Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics) Deemed Logically Distinct, and yet Equivalent, in Quantum Mechanics? In Christopher Lehrer (ed.), First Annual Conference in the Foundations and History of Quantum Physics. Max Planck Institute for History of Science.score: 189.0
    A recent rethinking of the early history of Quantum Mechanics deemed the late 1920s agreement on the equivalence of Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics, prompted by Schrödinger’s 1926 proof, a myth. Schrödinger supposedly failed to achieve the goal of proving isomorphism of the mathematical structures of the two theories, while only later developments in the early 1930s, especially the work of mathematician John von Neumman (1932) provided sound proof of equivalence. The alleged agreement about the Copenhagen Interpretation, predicated (...)
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  39. Sandro Petruccioli (2006). Atoms, Metaphors, and Paradoxes: Niels Bohr and the Construction of a New Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 189.0
    This book reexamines the birth of quantum mechanics, in particular examining the development of crucial and original insights of Bohr. In particular, it gives a detailed study of the development and the interpretation given to Bohr's Principle of Correspondence. It also describes the role that this principle played in guiding Bohr's research over the critical period from 1920 to 1927.
     
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  40. Sumati Surya & Petros Wallden (2010). Quantum Covers in Quantum Measure Theory. Foundations of Physics 40 (6):585-606.score: 187.7
    Sorkin’s recent proposal for a realist interpretation of quantum theory, the anhomomorphic logic or coevent approach, is based on the idea of a “quantum measure” on the space of histories. This is a generalisation of the classical measure to one which admits pair-wise interference and satisfies a modified version of the Kolmogorov probability sum rule. In standard measure theory the measure on the base set Ω is normalised to one, which encodes the statement that “Ω happens”. (...)
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  41. Werner Heisenberg (1983/1989). Encounters with Einstein: And Other Essays on People, Places, and Particles. Princeton University Press.score: 180.0
    In nine essays and lectures composed in the last years of his life, Werner Heisenberg offers a bold appraisal of the scientific method in the twentieth century--and relates its philosophical impact on contemporary society and science to the particulars of molecular biology, astrophysics, and related disciplines. Are the problems we define and pursue freely chosen according to our conscious interests? Or does the historical process itself determine which phenomena merit examination at any one time? Heisenberg discusses these issues in the (...)
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  42. Michel Paty (2012). On the Structure of Rationality in the Thought and Invention or Creation of Physical Theories. Principia 15 (2):303.score: 180.0
    We want to consider anew the question, which is recurrent along the history of philosophy, of the relationship between rationality and mathematics, by inquiring to which extent the structuration of rationality, which ensures the unity of its function under a variety of forms (and even according to an evolution of these forms), could be considered as homeomorphic with that of mathematical thought, taken in its movement and made concrete in its theories. This idea, which is as old as philosophy (...)
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  43. Alessandro Braccesi (2008). Al di Là Dell'intuizione: Per Una Storia Della Fisica Del Ventesimo Secolo: Relatività E Quantistica. Bononia University Press.score: 180.0
  44. Lewis Samuel Feuer (1974). Einstein and the Generations of Science. New York,Basic Books.score: 180.0
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  45. Werner Heisenberg (1981). Tradition in Science. Continuum.score: 180.0
  46. Werner Heisenberg (2004). U Istokov Kvantovoĭ Teorii: Sbornik. "Taĭdeks Ko,".score: 180.0
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  47. Roger G. Newton (2009). How Physics Confronts Reality: Einstein Was Correct, but Bohr Won the Game. World Scientific.score: 180.0
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  48. O. A. Nikolʹskiĭ (2004). Osnovy Korpuskuli͡arno-Polevoĭ Teorii. Karpov.score: 180.0
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  49. Gary Zukav (1979). The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics. Morrow.score: 180.0
     
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  50. L. Hardy (2003). Probability Theories in General and Quantum Theory in Particular. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (3):381-393.score: 177.0
    We consider probability theories in general. In the first part of the paper, various constraints are imposed and classical probability and quantum theory are recovered as special cases. Quantum theory follows from a set of five reasonable axioms. The key axiom which gives us quantum theory rather than classical probability theory is the continuity axiom, which demands that there exists a continuous reversible transformation between any pair of pure states. In the second part (...)
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