Search results for 'Queer theory' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Max H. Kirsch (2000). Queer Theory and Social Change. Routledge.score: 240.0
    The emergence of queer theory represents a huge leap in our understanding of lesbian and gay peoples. It embodies a context for treating these people as worthy of consideration in their own rights and not as an appendage to general cultural theory. Max Kirsch argues that the current development of this area is in danger of repeating past mistakes in the construction of analyses, and ultimately, social movements. In this way, the book presents an alternative to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Annamarie Jagose (1996). Queer Theory: An Introduction. New York University Press.score: 240.0
    "Annamarie Jagose knows that queer theory did not spring full-blown from the head of any contemporary theorist. It is the outcome of many different influences and sources, including the homophile movement, gay liberation, and lesbian feminism. In pointing to the history of queer theory-a history that all too often is ignored or elided-Jagose performs a valuable service." -Henry Abelove, co-editor of The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader The political and academic appropriation of the term queer (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Iain Morland & Annabelle Willox (eds.) (2005). Queer Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 240.0
    What is queer theory? What does it do? Is queer theory only for queers? This vibrant anthology of ground breaking work by influential scholars, activists, performers, and visual artists is essential reading for anyone with an interest in sexuality studies. The fifteen articles--including one from Judith Butler, as well as an engaging introduction--map, contextualize, and challenge queer theory's project both within and beyond the academy. Summaries and suggestions for further reading make the volume an (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Nikki Sullivan (2003). A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory. New York University Press.score: 240.0
    "This book is a succinct, pedagogically designed introduction. As classroom text, Sullivan's work is heady with vibrant debate and slim heuristics; her intellectual clarity is stunning." - Choice A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory explores the ways in which sexuality, subjectivity and sociality have been discursively produced in various historical and cultural contexts. The book begins by putting gay and lesbian sexuality and politics in historical context and demonstrates how and why queer theory emerged in the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Elizabeth Weed & Naomi Schor (eds.) (1997). Feminism Meets Queer Theory. Indiana University Press.score: 240.0
  6. Steven Seidman (ed.) (1996). Queer Theory/Sociology. Blackwell.score: 216.0
    This book aims to productively engage the pioneering work of Queer theorists and point toe way towards a new sociological Queer studies.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Noreen Giffney & Michael O'Rourke (eds.) (2009). The Ashgate Research Companion to Queer Theory. Ashgate.score: 216.0
    This interdisciplinary volume of thirty original essays engages with four key concerns of queer theoretical work: identity, discourse, normativity and ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. William B. Turner (2000). A Genealogy of Queer Theory. Temple University Press.score: 216.0
    As such, the book will interest readers of gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender studies, intellectual history, political theory, and the history of gender/sexuality ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Diane Richardson, Janice McLaughlin & Mark E. Casey (eds.) (2006). Intersections Between Feminist and Queer Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 216.0
    The emergence of queer ideas has unsettled other forms of exploring gender and sexuality, in particular feminism. In response, feminists have been significant critics of queer ideas. This book, through the contribution of important US and UK writers, seeks to explore the debates between feminist and queer theorizing in order to seek out interconnections between the two; they identify new directions in thinking about sexuality and gender that may emerge out of and at the interface.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Lee Edelman (2004). No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive. Duke University Press.score: 210.0
    The future is kid stuff -- Sinthom-osexuality -- Compassion's compulsion -- No future.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Annamarie Jagose (1996). Queer Theory. Melbourne University Press.score: 210.0
  12. Ki Namaste (1994). The Politics of Inside/Out: Queer Theory, Poststructuralism, and a Sociological Approach to Sexuality. Sociological Theory 12 (2):220-231.score: 186.0
    This paper outlines the main tenets of poststructuralism and considers how they are applied by practitioners of queer theory. Drawing on both Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida, queer theory explores the ways in which homosexual subjectivity is at once produced and excluded within culture, both inside and outside its borders. This approach is contrasted with more sociological studies of sexuality (labeling theory, social constructionism). Whereas queer theory investigates the relations between heterosexuality and homosexuality, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Donald E. Hall (2009). Reading Sexualities: Hermeneutic Theory and the Future of Queer Studies. Routledge.score: 186.0
    Sexual hermeneutics -- Desirably queer futures -- Transcending the self -- Global conversations -- Radical sexuality and ethical responsibility -- Conclusion. How sex changes.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Shannon Winnubst (2010). Temporality in Queer Theory and Continental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):136-146.score: 180.0
    The connections between the fields of queer theory and continental philosophy are strange and strained: simultaneously difficult and all too easy to ferret out, there is no easy narrative for how the two fields interconnect. Both sides of the relation seem either to disavow or simply repress any relation to the other. For example, despite the impact of Foucault's History of Sexuality, Volume One on early queer theory, current work in queer of color critique challenges (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 180.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Arlene Stein, Ken Plummer, Steven Epstein, Chrys Ingraham & Ki Namaste (1996). Sociology/Queer Theory: A Dialogue. In Steven Seidman (ed.), Queer Theory/Sociology. Blackwell.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stacey Young (1997). Dichotomies and Displacement: Bisexuality in Queer Theory and Politics. In Shane Phelan (ed.), Playing with Fire: Queer Politics, Queer Theories. Routledge. 55--56.score: 164.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Steven Seidman (1994). Queer-Ing Sociology, Sociologizing Queer Theory: An Introduction. Sociological Theory 12 (2):166-177.score: 156.0
  19. Arlene Stein & Ken Plummer (1994). "I Can't Even Think Straight" "Queer" Theory and the Missing Sexual Revolution in Sociology. Sociological Theory 12 (2):178-187.score: 156.0
  20. Adam Isaiah Green (2007). Queer Theory and Sociology: Locating the Subject and the Self in Sexuality Studies. Sociological Theory 25 (1):26 - 45.score: 156.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Adam Isaiah Green (2007). Queer Theory and Sociology: Locating the Subject and the Self in Sexuality Studies. Sociological Theory 25 (1):26-45.score: 156.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Harry M. Benshoff (2009). Broke)Back to the Mainstream: Queer Theory and Queer Cinemas Today. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Film Theory and Contemporary Hollywood Movies. Routledge. 192--213.score: 156.0
  23. Adam Isaiah Green'S. (2007). Queer Theory and Sociology: Locating the Subject and the Self in Sexuality Studies (Vol 25, Pg 1, 2007). Sociological Theory 25 (3):292-292.score: 156.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Donald E. Hall (2006). Gender and Queer Theory. In Paul Wake & Simon Malpas (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Critical Theory. Routledge. 102.score: 156.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Steven Seidman (1994). Special Issue on Queer Theory'. Sociological Theory 12.score: 156.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Steven Seidman (1994). Symposium: Queer Theory/Sociology: A Dialogue. Sociological Theory 12 (2):166-177.score: 156.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Steven Seidman (1994). Special Volume on Queer Theory. Sociological Theory 4 (2).score: 156.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Saša Vojković (2009). Feminism, Philosophy, and Queer Theory. Reformulating the Symbolic Universe: Kill Bill and Tarantino's Transcultural Imaginary. In Warren Buckland (ed.), Film Theory & Contemporary Hollywood Movies. Routledge.score: 156.0
  29. Shane Phelan (ed.) (1997). Playing with Fire: Queer Politics, Queer Theories. Routledge.score: 154.0
    The last five years have witnessed the birth of a vibrant new group of young scholars who are writing about queer law, politics, and policy--topics which are no longer treated as of interest only to lesbians and gay men, but which now garner the attention of political theorists of all stripes. Playing With Fire --the first scholarly collection on queer politics by US political theorists--opens the intersection of lesbian and gay studies and political theory to a wide (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael O'Rourke (2011). 'Girls Welcome!!!': Speculative Realism, Object Oriented Ontology, and Queer Theory. Speculations (II):275-312.score: 150.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Kristopher L. Cannon (2010). Chrysanthi Nigianni and Merl Storr (2009) Deleuze and Queer Theory, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Deleuze Studies 4 (3):432-436.score: 150.0
  32. Kathy Rudy (forthcoming). Radical Feminism, Lesbian Separatism, and Queer Theory. Feminist Studies.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. James Penney (2004). (Queer) Theory and the Universal Alternative. Diacritics 32 (2):3-19.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jan Campbell (2000). Arguing with the Phallus: Feminist, Queer, and Postcolonial Theory: A Psychoanalytic Contribution. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by St. Martin's Press.score: 150.0
    What can psychoanalysis offer contemporary arguments in the fields of Feminism, Queer Theory and Post-Colonialism? Jan Campbell introduces and analyses the way that psychoanalysis has developed and made problematic models of subjectivity linked to issues of sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and history. Via discussions of such influential and diverse figures as Lacan, Irigaray, Kristeva, Dollimore, Bhabha, Toni Morrison, and Alice Walker, Campbell uses psychoanalysis as a mediatory tool in a range of debates across the human sciences, while also arguing (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. G. W. Dowsett, John Kaldor, David McInnes & Mary Spongberg (1998). Queer Theory, Politics and HIV/AIDS. Metascience 7 (3):444-465.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Christopher Roman (2010). Lynne Huffer , Mad for Foucault: Rethinking the Foundations of Queer Theory (New York: Columbia University Press, 2009), ISBN: 978-0231149198. [REVIEW] Foucault Studies 9:209-211.score: 150.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. G. S. Rousseau (2000). Foucault and the Fortunes of Queer Theory. The European Legacy 5 (3):401-413.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jana Sawicki (2010). Foucault, Queer Theory, and the Discourse of Desire. In Timothy O'Leary & Christopher Falzon (eds.), Foucault and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 185.score: 150.0
  39. Tim Dean (2003). Lacan and Queer Theory. In Jean-Michel Rabaté (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Lacan. Cambridge University Press. 238--52.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Janet McCabe (2006). Queer Theory, Gender Theory: An Instant Primer. Nursing Inquiry 13 (3):238-239.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. A. Sinfield (2005). Didier Eribon, Insult and the Making of the Gay Self; Lee Edelman, No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive. Radical Philosophy 134:49.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Rachel Loewen Walker (2010). Lynne Huffer's Mad for Foucault: Rethinking the Foundations of Queer Theory. Phaenex 5 (2):210-221.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Penelope Deutscher (1996). Operative Différance in Recent Feminist, Queer and Post-Colonial Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (4):359–376.score: 120.0
  44. Robert McRuer (2002). Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3-4):221-237.score: 120.0
    In his contribution, “Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies,” Robert McRuer calls for the recognition of the points of convergence between AIDS theory, queer theory, and disability theory. McRuer points out ways in which minority identity groups such as people with AIDS, gays, lesbians, and bisexuals, and those with so-called disabilities, whose status has been described by others as “impaired,” have resisted this judgment by calling its ideological underpinnings into question. He contends that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Nancy J. Hirschmann (2013). Queer/Fear: Disability, Sexuality, and The Other. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):139-147.score: 120.0
    This paper examines the relationship between disability and “queerness.” I argue that the hostility frequently expressed against both disabled and queer individuals is a function of fear of the undecidability of the body. I draw on feminist, queer, and disability theory to help us understand this phenomenon and suggest that these different kinds of theories have a complementary relationship. That is, feminist and queer theory help us see how this fear works, disability theory helps (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Rosie Harding (2013). Martha Albertson Fineman, Jack E. Jackson and Adam P. Romero (Eds): Feminist and Queer Legal Theory: Intimate Encounters, Uncomfortable Conversations. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (3):311-314.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Judith Halberstam (2011). The Queer Art of Failure. Duke University Press.score: 114.0
    Introduction : low theory -- Animating revolt and revolting animation -- Dude, where's my phallus? forgetting, losing, looping -- The queer art of failure -- Shadow feminisms : queer negativity and radical passivity -- "The killer in me is the killer in you" : homosexuality and fascism -- Animating failure: ending, fleeing, surviving.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Shelley M. Park (2009). Is Queer Parenting Possible? In Who’s Your Daddy? And Other Writings on Queer Parenting. Toronto: Sumach Press.score: 102.0
    This paper examines the possibility of parenting as a queer practice. Examining definitions of “queer” as resistant to presumptions and practices of reprosexuality and repro-narrativity (Michael Warner), bourgeouis norms of domestic space and family time (Judith Halberstam), and policies of reproductive futurism (Lee Edelman), I argue that queer parenting is possible. Indeed, parenting that resists practices of normalization are, in part, realized by certain types of postmodern families. However, fully actualizing the possibility of parenting queerly—and thus teaching (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Shelley M. Park (2013). Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: Resisting Monomaternalism in Adoptive, Lesbian, Blended and Polygamous Families. SUNY.score: 100.0
    Bridging the gap between feminist studies of motherhood and queer theory, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood articulates a provocative philosophy of queer kinship that need not be rooted in lesbian or gay sexual identities. Working from an interdisciplinary framework that incorporates feminist philosophy and queer, psychoanalytic, poststructuralist, and postcolonial theories, Shelley M. Park offers a powerful critique of an ideology she terms monomaternalism. Despite widespread cultural insistence that every child should have one—and only one—“real” mother, many contemporary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Lance Wahlert (2013). The Burden of Poofs: Criminal Pathology, Clinical Scrutiny, and Homosexual Etiology in Queer Cinema. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):149-175.score: 96.0
    Given the resurgence of scientific studies on the etiology of homosexuality in the wake of the AIDS epidemic, this article considers the effects these studies had on contemporaneous queer filmmakers. By using the subject of criminality as a way to talk about homosexual causality, queer films of the 1990s illustrate that contemporary scientific studies on homosexuality were historically and politically situated in relation to cultural anxieties about other forms of deviance. This article focuses on films that dissect the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000