Search results for 'Quietism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tristram McPherson (2011). Against Quietist Normative Realism. Philosophical Studies 154 (2):223-240.score: 18.0
    Recently, some philosophers have suggested that a form of robust realism about ethics, or normativity more generally, does not face a significant explanatory burden in metaphysics. I call this view metaphysically quietist normative realism . This paper argues that while this view can appear to constitute an attractive alternative to more traditional forms of normative realism, it cannot deliver on this promise. I examine Scanlon’s attempt to defend such a quietist realism, and argue that rather than silencing metaphysical questions about (...)
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  2. Michael Steven Green (2008). Kelsen, Quietism, and the Rule of Recognition. In Matthew D. Adler & Kenneth E. Himma (eds.), THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Sometimes the fact that something is the law can be justified by the law. For example, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act is the law because it was enacted by Congress pursuant to the Commerce Clause. But eventually legal justification of law ends. The ultimate criteria of validity in a legal system cannot themselves be justified by law. According to H.L.A. Hart, justification of these ultimate criteria is still available, by reference to social facts concerning official acceptance - facts about what Hart calls (...)
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  3. Tim Button (2010). Dadaism: Restrictivism as Militant Quietism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (3pt3):387-398.score: 12.0
    Can we quantify over everything: absolutely, positively, definitely, totally, every thing? Some philosophers have claimed that we must be able to do so, since the doctrine that we cannot is self-stultifying. But this treats restrictivism as a positive doctrine. Restrictivism is much better viewed as a kind of militant quietism, which I call dadaism. Dadaists advance a hostile challenge, with the aim of silencing everyone who holds a positive position about ‘absolute generality’.
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  4. John McDowell (2009). Wittgensteinian “Quietism”. Common Knowledge 15 (3):365-372.score: 12.0
    In his Philosophical Investigations Wittgenstein describes, and represents himself as pursuing, a way of doing philosophy without putting forward philosophical theses. I exemplify his approach with a sketch of his treatment of rule following. I focus in particular on the simple case of following a signpost, conceived as an expression of a rule for getting to a destination. Wittgenstein uncovers a threat that we will find it mysterious how one could learn from a signpost which way to go, and he (...)
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  5. Stephen R. Munzer (2005). Self-Abandonment and Self-Denial Quietism, Calvinism, and the Prospect of Hell. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):747-781.score: 12.0
    Self-abandonment and self-denial are, respectively, Catholic and hyper-Calvinist analogues of each other. Roughly, each requires the surrendering of a person to God's will and providence through faith, hope, and love. Should the self-abandoning/self-denying individual accept his or her own damnation if that be God's will? This article, which is virtually alone in discussing the Catholic and Reformed Protestant traditions together, answers "No." The unqualified self-abandonment present in quietism and the radical self-denial of Samuel Hopkins are perverse and irrational responses (...)
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  6. Glenn Alexander Magee (2010). Quietism in German Mysticism and Philosophy. Common Knowledge 16 (3):457-473.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article argues that a strong strain of quietism runs through German intellectual history, from medieval mystics such as Eckhart to the main line of modern philosophers, including Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Heidegger. Magee treats each of these in turn, establishing case by case that the relation of the individual to the universal is the central issue of German thought, as it (...)
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  7. Bernard Faure (2010). In the Quiet of the Monastery Buddhist Controversies Over Quietism. Common Knowledge 16 (3):424-438.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article addresses a) the extent to which the familiar term “Buddhist quietism” is legitimate, b) the use of the term by Jesuit missionaries in Asia at the time that Catholic quietism was briefly flourishing in Europe, and c) the use of the term in the European philosophical controversy over Spinozism. Faure argues that, in most cases, the European critique of Buddhism was aimed (...)
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  8. Jacob Raz (2010). “Kill the Buddha” Quietism in Action and Quietism as Action in Zen Buddhist Thought and Practice. Common Knowledge 16 (3):439-456.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article proposes that, despite endless debates within Zen Buddhism between quietist tendencies (“sitting quietly, doing nothing”) and the instruction to act in the world (“go wash the dishes”), Zen has always held a nondualist approach that denies any contradiction between these seemingly distinct ways. Zen has never really seen them as distinct. The article does survey, however, several quietist sources for Zen in early Indian (...)
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  9. Tim Beasley-Murray (2013). Reticence and the Fuzziness of Thresholds a Bakhtinian Apology for Quietism. Common Knowledge 19 (3):424-445.score: 12.0
    This article discusses implicit conceptions of reticence in the early philosophical writings of Mikhail Bakhtin. Contrary to the image of Bakhtin as a thinker of dialogue, polyphony, and voice, it finds a strand in Bakhtin's thought that suggests that there might be good reasons for remaining silent and not stepping into the world in speech: in reticence, the human being avoids both judgment and being judged, eludes the risk of the addressee's absence or unreliability, and resists the finality of utterance (...)
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  10. Mita Choudhury (2009). A BETRAYAL OF TRUST The Jesuits and Quietism in Eighteenth-Century France. Common Knowledge 15 (2):164-180.score: 12.0
    An examination of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French history indicates that the relationship between the Jesuits and Quietism was shaped by politics as well as by concerns of theological orthodoxy. During the late 1690s, the Jesuits championed François Fénelon accused of Quietism at the same time as they spearheaded an attack against Quietism in Burgundy, emphasizing crimes of spiritual incest or the abuse of clerical authority. Such ambiguity indicates that the Jesuits were motivated by a desire to consolidate (...)
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  11. Christophe Fricker (2010). All Quietist on the Marina Front? Reading Ernst Jünger's Auf den Marmorklippen with Fénelon. Common Knowledge 16 (1):66-78.score: 12.0
    This article deals with the question of whether Ernst Jünger's long story Auf den Marmorklippen (1939)—the publication of the text itself as well as its contents—should be interpreted as political action or quietist retreat. The author examines the notions that the text advocates fatalism and escapism, both of which could be seen as tenets of (anti-)Catholic Quietism, of which Fénelon is cited as a practitioner. A close reading shows that Jünger's protagonists value their carefree and quiet lives before the (...)
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  12. Andrea R. Jain & Jeffrey J. Kripal (2009). Quietism and Karma Non-Action as Non-Ethics in Jain Asceticism. Common Knowledge 15 (2):197-207.score: 12.0
    This essay is conceived as a contribution to the academic debate on the ethical status of mystical traditions with regard to Jain asceticism in particular and—through comparison of Jain with Advaita Vedanta asceticism—to ideologies of radical quietism more generally. For both Jain and Advaita Vedantic ascetic traditions, the material world, and particularly the body, are the primary obstacles to spiritual development. We deal with the social, physical, and environmental implications of such a worldview, rather than with the practice or (...)
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  13. Hanne Andrea Kraugerud & Bjørn Torgrim Ramberg (2010). The New Loud Richard Rorty, Quietist? Common Knowledge 16 (1):48-65.score: 12.0
    Is Richard Rorty a philosophical quietist? We consider different stances Rorty has assumed toward philosophy, arguing that on the face of it there is no conflict between them. However, Rorty's extensive writing on the topic of truth suggests a tension between Rorty's own recommendation of “benign neglect” of metaphysics and his actual philosophical practice. The topic of truth actually serves Rorty's philosophical purposes well, allowing him to change the direction of conversation from a concern with the nature of concepts to (...)
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  14. W. Caleb McDaniel (2010). John Brown, Quietist. Common Knowledge 16 (1):31-47.score: 12.0
    In common usage, quietism is often conflated with passivity, and pacifism is often equated with quietism. As a result, pacifism has often been confused with passivity. In the antebellum United States, John Brown and other militant abolitionists who endorsed the use of violent antislavery tactics criticized nonviolent reformers like William Lloyd Garrison as men of words instead of men of action. Garrison and his allies rejected the equation of their pacifism with quietism, but the charge that Garrisonian (...)
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  15. Anonymous Envoi (2010). Quietism Now? Common Knowledge 16 (2):276-284.score: 12.0
    This essay explores the possibilities of quietism in our time. It begins by examining briefly versions of quietism, Eastern and Western, then turns to particular works of Rilke, Kafka, and Beckett to review exigent images of quietism, variously relevant to the modern condition. Subsequently, it touches on some contradictions of quietism and politics, which Zadie Smith also considers in her essay, “Speaking in Tongues.” Finally, the essay dwells on David Malouf's novel, An Imaginary Life, as a (...)
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  16. Dalia Ofer (2010). VICTIMS, FIGHTERS, SURVIVORS Quietism and Activism in Israeli Historical Consciousness. Common Knowledge 16 (3):493-517.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article reflects on the challenges that understanding the Holocaust posed for Jews in Palestine and has posed for them in Israel. Ofer concentrates on the images of victims, fighters, and survivors as they were formulated during the last years of World War II and after the establishment of the State of Israel. Behind these images stood historical, concrete human beings who were classified according to (...)
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  17. Sidney Plotkin (2010). The Critic as Quietist Thorstein Veblen's Radical Realism. Common Knowledge 16 (1):79-94.score: 12.0
    Though a radical critic of capitalist society, Thorstein Veblen was a political quietist. His ideas of social evolution, cultural lag, and predatory power help to explain why. Veblen saw the need for deep-seated social change but despaired of its chances. He was in crucial ways a tragic writer, a radical realist who refused to yield to the temptations of political life. Veblen's quietism also helps to explain the hesitant, often unwelcome reception more ideologically minded scholars have given to his (...)
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  18. Elaine Pryce (2010). “Negative to a Marked Degree” or “an Intense and Glowing Faith”? Rufus Jones and Quaker Quietism. Common Knowledge 16 (3):518-531.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article focuses on the early-twentieth-century Quaker historian and philosopher of mysticism, Rufus Jones, who treated Quietism as in polar opposition to the work of Quakerism “here in this world.” Consequently, he placed Quietism within a negatively-constructed framework of belief, identifying much of its influence in Quaker history on the spiritual teachings of the Miguel de Molinos, Madame Guyon, and François Fénelon. This article (...)
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  19. Caleb Thompson (2009). Quietism From the Side of Happiness Tolstoy, Schopenhauer, War and Peace. Common Knowledge 15 (3):395-411.score: 12.0
    Tolstoy writes in a letter to his friend A. A. Fet that what he has written in War and Peace, “especially in the epilogue,” is also said by Schopenhauer in The World as Will and Representation. Tolstoy adds, however, that Schopenhauer approaches “it from the other side.” Schopenhauer does indeed say much the same thing as Tolstoy says in his epilogue and elsewhere about history and the will. Each of these authors argues that history is not progressing and that it (...)
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  20. N. Verbin (2010). The Ladder and the Cage Wittgenstein, Qoheleth, and Quietism. Common Knowledge 16 (3):474-492.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article compares the worldview of Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes) and the quietism that it presumably entails to the early Wittgenstein's worldview and his quietism. The first section of the article treats a relevant paradox in the worldview of the early Wittgenstein: his positive exhortations for certain types of speech and silence, for certain types of action and inaction, seem in conflict with his statement that, (...)
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  21. Lesley Chamberlain (2009). Quietism and Polemic a Dialectical Story. Common Knowledge 15 (2):181-196.score: 12.0
    Although they have a religious origin, the terms quietist and quietism have generally been used in the anglophone world in the context created by the French Revolution, which made them expressions of political abuse. Examination of classic instances of their use shows that in fact they were terms of psychological abuse, signs that men and women of political commitment could not understand, let alone accept, others who were not committed to one side or other in the revolutionary struggle. This (...)
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  22. Pink Dandelion (2010). Guarded Domesticity and Engagement with “the World” the Separate Spheres of Quaker Quietism. Common Knowledge 16 (1):95-109.score: 12.0
    This contribution to a symposium on quietism concerns what is known as the Quietist period of Quakerism in the eighteenth century. Dandelion addresses the key question of conflict between the quietist commitment of the Quaker faithful and the commitment of many among them to abolitionism and other pressing social causes. He reviews the scholarship on this issue, noting the recent tendency to look for mystical aspects to the social commitment of Quakers. Instead, however, he argues that the culture of (...)
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  23. Amy M. King (2010). Quietism and Narrative Stillness. Common Knowledge 16 (3):532-551.score: 12.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article explores the possibilities for quietist narrative. Since quietism suggests resistance or condescension to telos, suspense, will, and the kinds of spirituality, politics, and ways of being associated with them, it seems unlikely that a narrative would be written or read by a practitioner of “ideal indifference” or by anyone averse on principle to initiative. But Gilbert White's text of 1789, The Natural History (...)
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  24. Jeffrey M. Perl, W. Caleb McDaniel, Hanne Andrea Kraugerud, Bjørn Torgrim Ramberg, Christophe Fricker, Sidney Plotkin, Pink Dandelion & Martin Mulsow (2010). Introduction: Mezza Voce Quietism? Common Knowledge 16 (1):22-30.score: 12.0
    In this introduction to the fourth part of an ongoing symposium on quietism, Perl, the editor of the sponsoring journal Common Knowledge, remarks on a new question raised in this latest grouping of articles. Can there be such a thing as a “mezza voce quietism”? Can there be activist quietists or quietist activists or active teachers of quietism without self-contradiction? Perl takes Gandhi and “passive resistance” as his own test case, concluding that Gandhi was a teacher of (...)
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  25. Charles M. Tung (2011). Disquieting Time Further Reflections on Modernism and Quietism. Common Knowledge 17 (2):394-410.score: 12.0
    For much of the twentieth century, the discipline of literary studies has grappled with the question of how its generally sotto voce activity responds to a history that calls loudly for action. This essay treats the question of literature's quietism in relation to the problem of literature's modernity and temporality. The turn away from the noise of the world at the beginning of the century has been criticized as the motivation for and the effect of modernism's obsession with time. (...)
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  26. Crispin Wright (2007). Rule-Following Without Reasons: Wittgenstein's Quietism and the Constitutive Question. Ratio 20 (4):481–502.score: 9.0
    This is a short, and therefore necessarily very incomplete discussion of one of the great questions of modern philosophy. I return to a station at which an interpretative train of thought of mine came to a halt in a paper written almost 20 years ago, about Wittgenstein and Chomsky,[1] hoping to advance a little bit further down the track. The rule-following passages in the Investigations and Remarks on the Foundations of Mathematics in fact raise a number of distinct (though connected) (...)
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  27. Steven French (2010). Keeping Quiet on the Ontology of Models. Synthese 172 (2):231 - 249.score: 9.0
    Stein once urged us not to confuse the means of representation with that which is being represented. Yet that is precisely what philosophers of science appear to have done at the meta-level when it comes to representing the practice of science. Proponents of the so-called ‘syntactic’ view identify theories as logically closed sets of sentences or propositions and models as idealised interpretations, or ‘theoruncula, as Braithwaite called them. Adherents of the ‘semantic’ approach, on the other hand, are typically characterised as (...)
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  28. Nick Zangwill (1992). Quietism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 17 (1):160-176.score: 9.0
    Metaphysics-—the enquiry into the constitution of reality-seems like the very crown of philosophy. What could be more exciting, more important, and more substantive than the pursuit of such a discipline? The majority of philosophers have been content to assume that metaphysics is a viable enterprise; they have held various metaphysical views and engaged in metaphysical arguments. But there has always been a small but persistent maverick minority of philosophers who have cast aspersions on the whole undertaking. Metaphysics, they tell us, (...)
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  29. Crispin Wright (1998). Comrades Against Quietism: Reply to Simon Blackburn on Truth and Objectivity. Mind 107 (425):183-203.score: 9.0
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  30. David Macarthur (2008). Pragmatism, Metaphysical Quietism, and the Problem of Normativity. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):193-209.score: 9.0
    There has always existed in the world, and there will always continue to exist, some kind of metaphysics, and with it the dialectic that is natural to pure reason. It is therefore the first and most important task of philosophy to deprive metaphysics, once and for all, of its injurious influence, by attacking its errors at their source. - Kant CPR:B xxxi..
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  31. T. Parent (2013). In the Mental Fiction, Mental Fictionalism is Fictitious. The Monist 96 (4):605-621.score: 9.0
    Here I explore the prospects for fictionalism about the mental, modeled after fictionalism about possible worlds. Mental fictionalism holds that the mental states posited by folk psychology do not exist, yet that some sentences of folk psychological discourse are true. This is accomplished by construing truths of folk psychology as “truths according to the mentalistic fiction.” After formulating the view, I identify five ways that the view appears self-refuting. Moreover, I argue that this cannot be fixed by semantic ascent or (...)
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  32. Stelios Virvidakis (2008). Varieties of Quietism. Philosophical Inquiry 30 (1-2):157-175.score: 9.0
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  33. Jakob Hohwy (1997). Quietism and Cognitive Command. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):495-500.score: 9.0
    Crispin Wright has sought to establish the possibility of ‘significant metaphysics’ in the shape of a common metric with which to measure the realism or robustness of various discourses. One means by which to place discourses in the metric is via the ‘cognitive command constraint’. Importantly, this constraint must be a priori. Richard Rorty has argued against this, that, given content is a function of standards of representationality, the a priori requirement cannot be satisfied. I show that this attack is (...)
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  34. Gerald Lang (2010). How Far Can You Go With Quietism? Problema 4:3-37.score: 9.0
    Ronald Dworkin’s Justice for Hedgehogs renews and amplifies his earlier attacks on metaethics. This article reviews the main lineaments of Dworkin’s anti-metaethical arguments and discusses, in detail, a number of issues which arise from them. First, it is suggested that Dworkin’s appraisal of what is doing most of the explanatory work in his account is largely askew. Second, it is claimed that Dworkin’s allegation that expressivism is self-defeating is wide of the mark, but that another charge in the same vicinity (...)
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  35. Montgomery Carmichael (1926). Miguel Molinos, Spanish Quietist. Thought 1 (1):39-53.score: 9.0
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  36. Charles L. Barzun (forthcoming). Metaphysical Quietism and Functional Explanation in the Law. Law and Philosophy:1-21.score: 9.0
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  37. Paolo Costa (2012). " What is Familiar is Not Understood Precisely Because It is Familiar" a Re-Examination of McDowell's Quietism. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 41 (1-3):103-127.score: 9.0
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  38. Daniel-Rops (1957). The Quietist Affair. Thought 32 (4):485-515.score: 9.0
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  39. Thomas M. Lennon (2013). Quietist Pure Love: The Impossible Supposition? International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (4):258-273.score: 9.0
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  40. Manuel de Pinedo Garcia (2008). Whistlin'past the Graveyard: Quietism and Philosophical Engagement. Philósophos-Revista de Filosofia 10 (2).score: 9.0
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  41. Kenneth Pennington (2003). Philippe Levillain, Gen. Ed., The Papacy: An Encyclopedia, 1: Abbreviator-Furnishings; 2: Gaius-Proxies; 3: Quietism-Zouaves, Pontifical. New York and London: Routledge, 2002. 1: Pp. Xxxv, 1–614; Tables. 2: Pp. Xiii, 615–1266; 1 Diagram, 1 Table, and Maps. 3: Pp. Xiii, 1267–1780; Tables and 1 Map. $395. First Published in 1994 Under the Title Dictionnaire Historique de la Papauté by Librairie Arthème Fayard. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):941-944.score: 9.0
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  42. Jeffrey M. Perl (2010). Apology for Quietism a Sotto Voce Symposium Part 4. Common Knowledge 16 (1):22-30.score: 9.0
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  43. A. W. Price (2013). A Quietist Particularism. In David Bakhurst, Margaret Olivia Little & Brad Hooker (eds.), Thinking About Reasons: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Dancy. Oxford University Press. 218.score: 9.0
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  44. Stelios Virvidakis (2010). The Allure of Hegelian Quietism. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 29 (3):163-174.score: 9.0
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  45. Manuel de Pinedo Garcia (2008). Whistlin' Past the Graveyard: Quietism and Philosophical Engagement. Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 10 (2).score: 9.0
    Resumo: nos últimos anos, John McDowell tem proposto uma concepção de filosofia em que o objetivo da disciplina não é oferecer teses substanciais, mas antes revelar modos de pensar e premissas ocultas que estão na base da filosofia construtiva. Esta visão terapêutica tem sido chamada ‘quietismo’ e deve muito a algumas idéias favoritas de Wittgenstein ao longo de toda a sua vida. No entanto, a obra de Wittgenstein (e, talvez, também a de McDowell) parece oscilar entre duas compreensões de quietismo: (...)
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  46. Niall Keane (2007). Heidegger: Decisionism and Quietism. European Journal of Political Theory 6 (1):115-120.score: 9.0
  47. Jeffrey M. Perl, Anthony W. Price, John McDowell, Matthew A. Taylor, Caleb Thompson & Douglas Mao (2009). Apology for Quietism: A Sotto Voce Symposium Part 3. Common Knowledge 15 (3):340-347.score: 9.0
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  48. Jeffrey M. Perl, Mita Choudhury, Lesley Chamberlain, Andrea R. Jain & Jeffrey J. Kripal (2009). Apology for Quietism: A Sotto Voce Symposium Part 2. Common Knowledge 15 (2):157-163.score: 9.0
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  49. Philip Pettit (2004). Existentialism, Quietism, and the Role of Philosophy. In Brian Leiter (ed.), The Future for Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 304--327.score: 9.0
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  50. Richard Rorty (2010). Naturalism and Quietism. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press.score: 9.0
     
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