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Robert L. Chapman [8]Robert Chapman [5]Robert M. Chapman [3]R. Chapman [3]
R. W. Chapman [2]Rohhss Chapman [1]Rebecca Chapman [1]Raymond Chapman [1]

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Profile: Robert James Chapman (University of Southampton)
Profile: Robert Chapman
  1. Ruth Zaslansky, Judith Rothaug, Richard C. Chapman, Ragnar Backström, Silviu Brill, Christoph Engel, Dominique Fletcher, Lucian Fodor, Peter Funk, Debra Gordon, Marcus Komann, Christoph Konrad, Andreas Kopf, Yigal Leykin, Esther Pogatzki-Zahn, Margarita Puig, Narinder Rawal, Matthias Schwenkglenks, Rod S. Taylor, Kristin Ullrich, Thomas Volk, Maryam Yahiaoui-Doktor & Winfried Meissner (forthcoming). Pain Out: An International Acute Pain Registry Supporting Clinicians in Decision Making and in Quality Improvement Activities. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:n/a-n/a.
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  2. Robert L. Chapman (2013). William R. Jordon III and George M. Lubick. Making Nature Whole: A History of Ecological Restoration. Environmental Ethics 35 (3):367-370.
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  3. Rohhss Chapman & Liz Tilley (2013). Exploring the Ethical Underpinnings of Self-Advocacy Support for Intellectually Disabled Adults. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):257-271.
    Self-advocacy organisations support people in a wide range of political activities, alongside providing key social networks. The emergence of formalised self-advocacy for intellectually disabled people marked an important cultural shift. These groups soon became associated with the pursuit of social change and the attainment of rights. The role of the self-advocacy support worker, working together with self-advocates, has been pivotal. However, studies have shown there has been concern over the relationship between self-advocates and those who advise or support them. Both (...)
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  4. Lisa Buckley, Mary Sheehan, Ian Shochet & Rebekah L. Chapman (2012). Towards an Integration of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Cognitive Behavioural Strategies: An Example From a School-Based Injury Prevention Programme. Educational Studies 39 (3):285-297.
    Adolescent risk-taking behaviour has potentially serious injury consequences and school-based behaviour change programmes provide potential for reducing such harm. A well-designed programme is likely to be theory-based and ecologically valid; however, it is rare that the operationalisation process of theories is described. The aim of this paper is to outline how the theory of planned behaviour and cognitive behavioural therapy informed intervention design in a school setting. Teacher interviews provided insights into strategies that might be implemented within the curriculum and (...)
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  5. L. Buckley, R. L. Chapman, M. Sheehan & L. Cunningham (2011). Keeping Friends Safe: A Prospective Study Examining Early Adolescent's Confidence and Support Networks. Educational Studies 38 (4):373-381.
    There is a continued need to consider ways to prevent early adolescent engagement in a variety of harmful risk-taking behaviours for example, violence, road-related risks and alcohol use. The current prospective study examined adolescents? reports of intervening to try and stop friends? engagement in such behaviours among 207 early adolescents (mean age?=?13.51?years, 50.1% females). Findings showed that intervening behaviour after three months was predicted by the confidence to intervene which in turn was predicted by student and teacher support although not (...)
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  6. Robert L. Chapman (2011). Reconnecting Lives to the Land: An Agenda for Critical Dialogue. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):239 - 242.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 239-242, June 2011.
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  7. Robert Chapman (2008). Character and Environment. Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):180-184.
  8. Robert L. Chapman (2007). How to Think About Environmental Studies. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):59–74.
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  9. Robert L. Chapman (2005). Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology, and Natural Selection. Environmental Philosophy 2 (2):74-76.
  10. Robert Chapman (2004). Crowded Solitude. Environmental Philosophy 1 (1):58-72.
    Wilderness and wildness are not related isomorphically. Wildness is the broader category; all instances of wilderness express wildness while all instances of wildness do not express wilderness. There is more than a logical distinction between wildness and wilderness, and what begins as an analytic distinction ends as an ontological one. A more rhetorical representation of this confusion is captured by the notion of synecdoche, where, in this case, wilderness the narrower term is used for wildness the more expansive term. Although (...)
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  11. Elisa Aaltola, Gary Backhaus, John Murungi, Jennifer Bates, Emily Brady, Emily Brady Haapala, J. Baird Callicott & Robert L. Chapman (2003). Report on Books and Articles. Environmental Ethics 24:75-91.
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  12. Robert Chapman (2003). Other Archaeologies and Disciplines: Mortuary Analysis in the Twenty-First Century. In Robert J. Jeske & Douglas K. Charles (eds.), Theory, Method, and Practice in Modern Archaeology. Praeger.
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  13. Yutaka Nakamura & R. Chapman (2002). Measuring Pain: An Introspective Look at Introspection. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):582-592.
  14. Robert M. Chapman (1999). Function and Content Words Evoke Different Brain Potentials. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):282-284.
    Word class-specific differences in brain evoked potentials (EP) are discussed for connotative meaning and for function versus content words. A well-controlled experiment found matching lexical decision times for function and content words, but clear EP differences (component with maximum near 550 msec) among function words, content words, and nonwords that depended on brain site. Another EP component, with a 480 msec maximum, differentiated words (either function or content) from nonwords.
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  15. Raymond Chapman (1997). Changing Perspectives in Genre Theory. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 75 (3):617-628.
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  16. Robert Chapman (1995). Urbanism in Copper and Bronze Age Iberia? Proceedings of the British Academy 86:29-46.
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  17. S. M. Garnsey, M. K. Tanenhaus & R. M. Chapman (1989). Preferred Verb Argument Structure in Sentence Comprehension-an Erp Study. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):522-522.
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  18. Robert M. Chapman (1988). Dual Thrust in Interpreting P3 and Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):377.
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  19. Sm Garnsey, Mk Tanenhaus & R. Chapman (1988). Evoked-Potentials and Parsing. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):492-492.
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  20. Rebecca Chapman (1987). The Calf's Prayer. Between the Species 3 (2):8.
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  21. S. R. F. Price, R. Chapman, G. Gnoli, J. -P. Vernant, S. C. Humphreys, H. King, E. Vermeule & J. Whaley (1983). The Archaeology of DeathLa Mort, les Morts Dans les Societes anciennesMortality and Immortality: The Anthropology and Archaeology of DeathAspects of Death in Early Greek Art and PoetryMirrors of Mortality: Studies in the Social History of Death. Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:195.
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  22. Robert Chapman, Frank Masterpasqua & Richard Lore (1976). The Effects of Crowding During Pregnancy on Offspring Emotional and Sexual Behavior in Rats. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (5):475-477.
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  23. Richard E. Chapman (1969). Robert S. Hartman. The Structure of Value: Foundations of Scientific Axiology. The Modern Schoolman 46 (2):162-163.
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  24. Joseph Halpern, Jeffrey A. Schwartz & Richard Chapman (1968). Simultaneous and Successive Contrast Effects in Human-Probability Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (4):581.
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  25. Murray Glanzer, Robert M. Chapman, William H. Clark & Henry R. Bragdon (1964). Changes in Two EEG Rhythms During Mental Activity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (3):273.
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  26. R. W. Chapman (1936). Plato, Rep. 369D. The Classical Review 50 (05):167-.
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  27. R. W. Chapman (1912). Correspondence. The Classical Review 26 (01):38-.
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