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Profile: Rebecca Copenhaver (Lewis & Clark College)
  1. Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.) (forthcoming). Mind, Knowledge and Action: Essays in Honor of Reid’s Tercentenary.
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  2. Rebecca Copenhaver (forthcoming). Thomas Reid on Aesthetic Perception. In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Mind, Knowledge and Action: Essays in Honor of Reid’s Tercentenary.
  3. Rebecca Copenhaver (2014). Berkeley on the Language of Nature and the Objects of Vision. Res Philosophica 91 (1):29-46.
    Berkeley holds that vision, in isolation, presents only color and light. He also claims that typical perceivers experience distance, figure, magnitude, and situation visually. The question posed in New Theory is how we perceive by sight spatial features that are not, strictly speaking, visible. Berkeley’s answer is “that the proper objects of vision constitute an universal language of the Author of nature.” For typical humans, this language of vision comes naturally. Berkeley identifies two sorts of objects of vision: primary (light (...)
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  4. Rebecca Copenhaver (2013). Origins of Objectivity, by Tyler Burge. Mind 122 (488):1065-1068.
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  5. Rebecca Copenhaver (2013). Perception and the Language of Nature. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. 107.
  6. Rebecca Copenhaver (2013). Recent Anthologies on Modern Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 36 (2):161-172.
    Four anthologies covering the modern period are reviewed here and assessed with respect to whether anthologized selections and supplementary materials are useful to teachers and undergraduate students. With the exception of one anthology, each volume makes conservative choices in representing the modern period. Such choices reinforce a history of the modern period increasingly out of step with current scholarship and discourage scholarly teachers from presenting a history deeply embedded in science, psychology, education, economics, religion, mathematics, and social, political and moral (...)
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  7. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2012). From Kant to Croce. University of Toronto Press.
    From around 1800, shortly before Pasquale Galluppi's first book, until 1950, just before Benedetto Croce died, the most formative influences on Italian philosophers were Kant and the post-Kantians, especially Hegel. In many ways, the Italian philosophers of this period lived in turbulent but creative times, from the Restoration to the Risorgimento and the rise and fall of Fascism. -/- From Kant to Croce is a comprehensive, highly readable history of the main currents and major figures of modern Italian philosophy, described (...)
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  8. Rebecca Copenhaver (2010). Thomas Reid on Acquired Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):285-312.
    Thomas Reid's distinction between original and acquired perception is not merely metaphysical; it has psychological and phenomenological stories to tell. Psychologically, acquired perception provides increased sensitivity to features in the environment. Phenomenologically, Reid's theory resists the notion that original perception is exhaustive of perceptual experience. James Van Cleve has argued that most cases of acquired perception do not count as perception and so do not pose a threat to Reid's direct realism. I argue that acquired perception is genuine perception and (...)
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  9. Rebecca Copenhaver, Reid on Memory and Personal Identity. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10. Rebecca Copenhaver (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (1):115-121.
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  11. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2008). How Croce Became a Philosopher. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (1):75 - 94.
  12. Rebecca Copenhaver (2007). Reid on Consciousness: Hop, Hot or For? Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):613-634.
    Thomas Reid claims to share Locke's view that consciousness is a kind of inner sense. This is puzzling, given the role the inner-sense theory plays in indirect realism and in the theory of ideas generally. I argue that Reid does not in fact hold an inner-sense theory of consciousness and that his view differs importantly from contemporary higher-order theories of consciousness. For Reid, consciousness is a first-order representational process in which a mental state with a particular content suggests the application (...)
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  13. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2006). The Strange Italian Voyage of Thomas Reid: 1800-60. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):601 – 626.
  14. Rebecca Copenhaver (2006). Is Thomas Reid a Mysterian? Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):449-466.
    : Some critics find that Thomas Reid thinks the mind especially problematic, "hid in impenetrable darkness". I disagree. Reid does not hold that mind, more than body, resists explanation by the new science. The physical sciences have made great progress because they were transformed by the Newtonian revolution, and the key transformation was to stop looking for causes. Reid's harsh words are a call for methodological reform, consonant with his lifelong pursuit of a science of mind and also with his (...)
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  15. Rebecca Copenhaver (2006). Thomas Reid's Philosophy of Mind: Consciousness and Intentionality. Philosophy Compass 1 (3):279-289.
    Thomas Reid’s epistemological ambitions are decisively at the center of his work. However, if we take such ambitions to be the whole story, we are apt to overlook the theory of mind that Reid develops and deploys against the theory of ideas. Reid’s philosophy of mind is sophisticated and strikingly contemporary, and has, until recently, been lost in the shadow of his other philosophical accomplishments. Here I survey some aspects of Reid’s theory of mind that I find most interesting. I (...)
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  16. Rebecca Copenhaver (2006). Thomas Reid's Theory of Memory. History of Philosophy Quarterly 23 (2):171 - 189.
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  17. Rebecca Copenhaver (2004). A Realism for Reid: Mediated but Direct. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):61 – 74.
    It is commonly said of modern philosophy that it introduced a representative theory of perception, a theory that places representative mental items between perceivers and ordinary physical objects. Such a theory, it has been thought, would be a form of indirect realism: we perceive objects only by means of apprehending mental entities that represent them. The moral of the story is that what began with Descartes’s revolution of basing objective truth on subjective certainty ends with Hume’s paroxysms of ambivalence and (...)
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  18. Rebecca Copenhaver (2004). Thomas Reid and Scepticism: His Reliabilist Response. Philosophical Review 113 (4):574-577.
  19. Knud Haakonssen, Manfred Kuehn, Daniel Schulthess, M. A. Stewart, Alexander Broadie, Rebecca Copenhaver, John Glassford, Miguel A. Badia-Cabrera, Aaron Garrett & Atis Zakatistovs (2001). British Society for the History of Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):195.
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  20. Rebecca Copenhaver (2000). Thomas Reid's Direct Realism. Reid Studies 4 (1):17-34.
    Thomas Reid thought of himself as a critic of the representative theory of perception, of what he called the ‘theory of ideas’ or ‘the ideal theory’.2 He had no kind words for that theory: “The theory of ideas, like the Trojan horse, had a specious appearance both of innocence and beauty; but if those philosophers had known that it carried in its belly death and destruction to all science and common sense, they would not have broken down their walls to (...)
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