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  1. Robert D'amico (unknown). Frederic Jameson, "The Prison House of Language"; Victor Erlich, "Russian Formalism: History, Doctrine". [REVIEW] Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 22.
    Title: The Prison House of LanguagePublisher: Princeton University PressISBN: 0691013160Author: Frederic JamesonTitle: Russian Formalism: History, DoctrinePublisher: Mouton & Co.Author: Victor Erlich.
     
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  2. Robert D'amico (unknown). Philosophy of Art. [REVIEW] Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 74.
     
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  3. R. D'Amico & W. Butchard (2012). How Not to Save Searle: A Reply to Weber's Reply. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (3):445-448.
    In response to "‘Counting As’ a Bridge Principle: Against Searle Against Social-Scientific Laws," Elijah Weber distinguishes two sorts of physical open-endedness and claims our article appeals to the wrong sort. We clarify that Searle’s notion of physical open-endedness is neither of the notions Weber introduces, thus our original reply to Searle is not targeted by Weber’s objections. Also, Weber’s lengthy example concerning counterfeit currency appears to build-in the extremely contentious assumption that scientific laws are impossible if and when relevant conditions (...)
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  4. William Butchard & Robert D'Amico (2011). "Counting As" a Bridge Principle: Against Searle Against Social-Scientific Laws. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (4):455-469.
    John Searle’s argument that social-scientific laws are impossible depends on a special open-ended feature of social kinds. We demonstrate that under a noncontentious understanding of bridging principles the so-called "counts-as" relation, found in the expression "X counts as Y in (context) C," provides a bridging principle for social kinds. If we are correct, not only are social-scientific laws possible, but the "counts as" relation might provide a more perspicuous formulation for candidate bridge principles.
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  5. Robert D'Amico (2010). Heideggerian in Spite of Himself. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):161-169.
    As far as I know, this is the first book-length study of Ernst Tugendhat in English. That is a bit of a surprise since Tugendhat is the last of Heidegger's students who went on to develop a significantly distinct philosophical approach, and it was one closer to the practice of philosophy in the United States and England than in Germany. The fact that this book is the author's expanded translation from the Italian probably indicates that this lack of attention to (...)
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  6. Robert D'Amico (2005). Laws and Concepts. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2005 (131):50-64.
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  7. Robert D'Amico (2005). Sensations and Methodology. In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.
     
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  8. Eugenio E. Zaldivar & Robert D'Amico, Was Descartes a Trialist?
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  9. Robert D'amico (2004). Philosophy: Any Defensible Province Of Its Own? Presidential Address To The 49th Annual Meeting Of The Florida Philosophical Association. Florida Philosophical Review 4 (1):4-11.
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  10. Robert D'amico & Paul Piccone (2004). Introduction: The Long March Out of the 20th Century. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 127.
     
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  11. Robert D'Amico & Paul Piccone (2004). The Long March Out of the 20th Century. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2004 (127):2-10.
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  12. Robert D'amico (2003). Lawrence I. Hatab, Ethics and Finitude: Heideggerian Contributions to Moral Philosophy, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, New York, 2000, Pp. 240. Utilitas 15 (02):251-.
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  13. Robert D'Amico (2002). R.M. Hare, 1919-2002. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 76 (2):129 - 130.
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  14. Robert D'Amico (2000). Holistic Republicanism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2000 (118):183-192.
    Title: The Common Mind: An Essay on Psychology, Society, and PoliticsPublisher: Oxford University PressISBN: 0195106458Author: Philip PettitTitle: Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and GovernmentPublisher: Oxford University PressISBN: 0198296428Author: Philip Pettit.
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  15. Robert D'Amico (1999). Contemporary Continental Philosophy. Westview Press.
    Contemporary Continental Philosophy steps back from current debates comparing Continental and analytic philosophy and carefully, yet critically outlines the tradition’s main philosophical views on epistemology and ontology. Forgoing obscure paraphrases, D’Amico provides a detailed, clear account and assessment of the tradition from its founding by Husserl and Heidegger to its challenge by Derrida and Foucault. Though intended as a survey of this tradition throughout the twentieth century, this study’s focus is on the philosophical problems which gave it birth and even (...)
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  16. Robert D'Amico (1999). The Poverty of Cosmopolitanism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (117):167-174.
    This volume contains an essay by Martha Nussbaum in defense of world citizenship or “cosmopolitanism,” as opposed to patriotism, which she defines as any view treating “national boundaries as morally salient,” together with a series of brief supportive (Anthony Appiah and Amartya Sen) and critical (Benjamin Barber, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Hilary Putnam, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Michael Walzer, et al.) comments. The essay originally appeared in The Boston Review in 1994 and led to bringing together the “usual suspects” for a bit of (...)
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  17. Robert D'Amico (1998). Reply to the Introduction to Telos 108. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (110):141-147.
    Before commenting on the “Introduction” to Telos 108 by Piccone, Berman and Ulmen, I want to cite two distinctions relevant to my discussion of it. First, federalism and populism are separate concepts, whatever it turns out is the proper meaning of populism and whether or not the intent of the Introduction was to argue for both. Federalism concerns a type of social organization held to be preferable for relatively complex commercial societies; the kind of societies that presently dominate the first (...)
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  18. Robert D'Amico (1998). Spreading Disease: A Controversy Concerning the Metaphysics of Disease. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (2):143 - 162.
    This article concerns the metaphysics of disease. Is disease a fixed feature of the world or a social value or preference? I argue that disease is not a value-laden concept and thus debates concerning it differ fundamentally from debates concerning health, harm, or suffering where evaluative judgements are central. I show how the so-called social constructionist view of disease has been motivated both by ethical concerns with medical practices and general theoretical doubts about scientific naturalism. If I can show that (...)
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  19. Robert D'Amico (1997). Impossible Laws. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (3):309-327.
  20. R. D'Amico, P. Piccone & G. Ulmen (1996). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1996 (107):3-9.
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  21. R. D'Amico (1994). What Was Telos All About? Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1994 (101):97-100.
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  22. Robert D'Amico (1994). Burdens of Proof in Modern Discourse. Review of Metaphysics 47 (4):814-815.
  23. Robert D'amico (1994). Sed Amentes Sunt Isti: Against Michel Foucault's Account of Cartesian Skepticism. Philosophical Forum 26 (1):33-48.
     
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  24. R. D'Amico (1993). Cold Fusion. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1993 (97):112-114.
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  25. Robert D'Amico (1993). Book Review:Willful Liberalism: Voluntarism and Individuality in Political Theory and Practice. Richard E. Flathman. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (1):178-.
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  26. R. D'Amico (1992). Problems with Traditions. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1992 (94):37-44.
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  27. R. D'Amico (1992). Book Reviews : Douglas E. Williams, Truth, Hope, and Power: The Thought of Karl Popper. University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1989. Pp. 237, $35.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (2):251-255.
  28. R. D'Amico & P. Piccone (1992). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1992 (91):3-15.
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  29. R. A. Berman & R. D'Amico (1991). Introduction to "Special Section on Musicology": Popular Music From Adorno to Zappa. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1991 (87):71-77.
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  30. R. D'Amico (1991). Myth of the Totally Administered Society. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1991 (88):80-94.
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  31. L. Goodwyn, C. Lasch, T. Luke, R. D'amico, A. Fraser, P. Piccone, G. Ulmen, V. Vujacic, V. Zaslavsky & J. Michael (1991). Populism Vs. The New Class. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 88:2-179.
     
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  32. R. D'Amico (1990). Intellectual Eclipse. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1990 (83):163-167.
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  33. R. D'Amico (1990). Karl Popper and the Frankfurt School. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1990 (86):33-48.
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  34. R. D'Amico (1990). Packaging Fog. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1990 (83):205-208.
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  35. R. D'Amico (1990). What Theory? Whose Community? Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1990 (86):158-169.
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  36. Robert D'Amico (1990). Steve Fuller, Social Epistemology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (9):362-365.
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  37. Robert D'amico (1990). Steve Fuller, Social Epistemology. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 10:362-365.
     
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  38. Robert D'Amico (1989). Historicism and Knowledge. Routledge.
  39. R. D'Amico (1988). The Hidden Telos. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1988 (75):26-35.
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  40. R. D'Amico & A. J. Layon (1988). AIDS and The Politics of Morbidity. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1988 (76):115-129.
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  41. Robert D'amico (1988). Relativism and Conceptual Schemes. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (2):201.
     
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  42. R. D'Amico (1987). Philosophy for Art. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1987 (74):177-183.
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  43. Juan E. Corradi, Robert D'Amico & Paul Piccone (1986). Introduction to Squaring the Hexagon: Special Issue on French Politics and Culture. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1986 (67):3-9.
    When, in Telos #55, we sought to evaluate the meaning and impact of French socialism in power, the verdict turned out to be peculiarly disappointing. The rhetorical question in the Introduction: “Beyond Reform or Revolution?” had already been effectively answered. As early as 1982 French socialism had revealed itself to be a “Gaullism with a Human Face” which did not have much to do either widi reform or revolution, and could provide nothing more -above and beyond the usual cliches—than a (...)
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  44. Robert D'Amico (1986). Essays in Memory of Mitchell Franklin. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1986 (70):6-10.
    From 1969 through the 70's Mitchell Franklin was Emeritus Professor of Law and Philosophy at SUNY Buffalo. Over this period his teaching gradually shifted to philosophy where he gave a series of lectures on Hegel, Marx and Neo-Hegelianism, which attracted and influenced a new group of students. These philosophy students were rediscovering the Continental tradition and turning to phenomenology, Western Marxism and German Idealism against die positivist and analytic traditions which had a dying but tenacious hold on philosophy. The following (...)
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  45. Robert D'Amico (1986). Going Relativist. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1986 (67):135-145.
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  46. Robert D'amico (1985). A.J. Polan, "Lenin And The End Of Politics". [REVIEW] Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 64.
     
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  47. Robert D'Amico (1985). Deconstructing D'Amico, or Why Joel Whitebook is so Upset. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (64):153-156.
    My review of Cornelius Castoriadis' book Crossroads in the Labyrinth ended with the apt reference, I now see, to the emperor being naked. In Joel Whitebook's second review, largely irrelevant to my criticisms of Castoriadis, he fears, though he doesn't know me personally, that only the lack of psychological counseling can explain my uncontrolled anger against Castoriadis. Let me dignify his long distance psychoanalysis by passing over it in silence. Silence is also the best remedy for Whitebook's transcendental deduction that (...)
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  48. Robert D'Amico (1985). Lenin and the End of Politics. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (64):157-165.
    At the end of World War II Karl Popper, at the time a little known philosopher of science, published The Open Society and Its Enemies. He dedicated the book to the victims of both Hitler's and Stalin's camps and called it his “war effort.” The book had an enormous impact and spawned both imitators, such as Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism, and a great deal of debate. Whatever else it accomplished Popper's work politicized the history of ideas. Against the (...)
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  49. Robert D'Amico (1984). Bernard Semmel, Ed., Marxism and the Science of War Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 4 (6):284-286.
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  50. Robert D'amico (1984). Bernard Semmel, Ed., Marxism and the Science of War. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 4:284-286.
     
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