22 found
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  1.  3
    Russell Disilvestro (2015). The Arc of the Moral Universe Is Long, But It Bends Toward Mercy and Grace: And Other Delightful Surprises of a Distinctively Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 21 (3):262-281.
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  2.  7
    Russell DiSilvestro (2010). Human Capacities and Moral Status. Bioethics 108:165-199.
    Many debates about the moral status of things—for example, debates about the natural rights of human fetuses or nonhuman animals—eventually migrate towards a discussion of the capacities of the things in question—for example, their capacities to feel pain, think, or love. Yet the move towards capacities is often controversial: if a human’s capacities are the basis of its moral status, how could a human having lesser capacities than you and I have the same "serious" moral status as you and I? (...)
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  3.  13
    R. Disilvestro (2012). The Ghost in the Machine Is the Elephant in the Room: Souls, Death, and Harm at the End of Life. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (5):480-502.
    The idea that we human beings have souls that can continue to have conscious experiences after the deaths of our bodies is controversial in contemporary academic bioethics; this idea is obviously present whenever questions about harm at the end of life are discussed, but this idea is often ignored or avoided because it is more comfortable to do so. After briefly discussing certain types of experiences that lead some people to believe in souls that can survive the deaths of their (...)
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  4.  42
    Russell Disilvestro (2009). Reproductive Autonomy, the Non-Identity Problem, and the Non-Person Problem. Bioethics 23 (1):59-67.
    The Non-Identity Problem is the problem of explaining the apparent wrongness of a decision that does not harm people, especially since some of the people affected by the decision would not exist at all were it not for the decision. One approach to this problem, in the context of reproductive decisions, is to focus on wronging, rather than harming, one's offspring. But a Non-Person Problem emerges for any view that claims (1) that only persons can be wronged and (2) that (...)
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  5.  53
    Russell DiSilvestro (2014). Irreversible Shmirreversible. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):26-28.
  6.  18
    Russell DiSilvestro (2009). Capacities, Hierarchies, and the Moral Status of Normal Human Infants and Fetuses. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (4):479-492.
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  7.  12
    Russell DiSilvestro (2011). The Parthenotes and the Parthenon. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (3):35-36.
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  8.  13
    Russell Disilvestro (2006). Not Every Cell is Sacred: A Reply to Charo. Bioethics 20 (3):146–157.
  9.  11
    R. DiSilvestro (2008). A Qualified Endorsement of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Based on Two Widely Shared Beliefs About the Brain-Diseased Patients Such Research Might Benefit. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):563-567.
    Are there persuasive approaches to embryonic stem cell (ESC) research that appeal, not just to those fellow-citizens in one’s own ideological camp, nor just to those undecided citizens in the middle, but to those citizens on the other side of the issue? I believe that there are such arguments and in this short paper I try to develop one of them. In particular, I argue that certain beliefs shared by some proponents and some opponents of ESC research—beliefs about the personal (...)
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  10.  1
    Timothy Houk, Russell DiSilvestro & Mark Jensen (2016). Smoke and Mirrors: Subverting Rationality, Positive Freedom, and Their Relevance to Nudging and/or Smoking Policies. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7):20-22.
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  11.  9
    Russell DiSilvestro (2009). Small-R-Republicans, Big-R-Republicans, and Government Bioethics Councils. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):57 – 58.
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  12.  11
    Russell DiSilvestro (2008). Precisely Which Claim Makes Spontaneous Abortion a Scourge? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):31 – 33.
  13.  14
    Russell Disilvestro (2005). Human Embryos in the Original Position? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (3):285 – 304.
    Two different discussions in John Rawls' A Theory of Justice lead naturally to a rather conservative position on the moral status of the human embryo. When discussing paternalism, he claims that the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves in case they end up as incapacitated or undeveloped human beings when the veil of ignorance is lifted. Since human embryos are examples of such beings, the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves from their (...)
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  14.  4
    Paul J. Olscamp, R. Jeffrey, Christopher Lake, Russell DiSilvestro & Irving Singer (2004). News 127–138 Information for Contributors 139–140. Journal of Value Inquiry 38:603-605.
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  15.  13
    Russell DiSilvestro (2012). What Does Not Budge for Any Nudge? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):14-15.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 14-15, February 2012.
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  16.  17
    Russell DiSilvestro (2005). Six Names of Beauty. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (2):279-282.
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  17.  12
    Russell DiSilvestro (2007). What's Wrong with Deliberately Proselytizing Patients? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):22 – 24.
  18.  6
    R. DiSilvestro (2012). Three Christian Arguments Against Germline Engineering. Christian Bioethics 18 (2):201-218.
    Are there any specifically Christian grounds for prohibiting, in principle, human germline engineering? In addressing this question, I deliberately limit my investigation in scope (by focusing narrowly on germline engineering itself) and in perspective (by focusing narrowly on the direct and often distinctive contributions of Christian theology). The three arguments I consider for the conclusion that germline engineering is morally prohibited are the argument from playing God, the argument from self-defeat, and the argument from genetic prevention.
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  19.  3
    Russell DiSilvestro (2012). The Two-Essence Problem That Wasn't. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):34-35.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 34-35, September 2012.
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  20.  1
    Russell DiSilvestro (2013). "Review of" Dignity: Its History and Meaning". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 14 (1):13.
  21. Russell Disilvestro (2003). Book Review. [REVIEW] Philosophia Christi 5 (1):308-313.
     
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  22. R. Disilvestro (2006). Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: An Introduction. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):96-97.
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