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  1. R. E. Jennings, Y. Chen & J. Sahasrabudhe (2011). On a New Idiom in the Study of Entailment. Logica Universalis 5 (1):101-113.
    This paper is an experiment in Leibnizian analysis. The reader will recall that Leibniz considered all true sentences to be analytically so. The difference, on his account, between necessary and contingent truths is that sentences reporting the former are finitely analytic; those reporting the latter require infinite analysis of which God alone is capable. On such a view at least two competing conceptions of entailment emerge. According to one, a sentence entails another when the set of atomic requirements for the (...)
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  2. Kam Sing Leung & R. E. Jennings (2005). A Deontic Counterpart of Lewis's S1. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 46 (2):217-230.
    In this paper we investigate nonnormal modal systems in the vicinity of the Lewis system S1. It might be claimed that Lewis's modal systems (S1, S2, S3, S4, and S5) are the starting point of modern modal logics. However, our interests in the Lewis systems and their relatives are not (merely) historical. They possess certain syntactical features and their frames certain structural properties that are of interest to us. Our starting point is not S1, but a weaker logic S1 (S1 (...)
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  3. D. Serenac & R. E. Jennings (2003). The Preservation of Relevance. Eidos 17:23-36.
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  4. R. E. Jennings (1994). The Genealogy of Disjunction. Oxford University Press.
    This is a comprehensive study of the English word 'or', and the logical operators variously proposed to present its meaning. Although there are indisputably disjunctive uses of or in English, it is a mistake to suppose that logical disjunction represents its core meaning. 'Or' is descended from the Anglo-Saxon word meaning second, a form which survives in such expressions as "every other day." Its disjunctive uses arise through metalinguistic applications of an intermediate adverbial meaning which is conjunctive rather than disjunctive (...)
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  5. R. E. Jennings (1994). The or of Free Choice Permission. Topoi 13 (1):3-10.
    I argue that the conjunctive distribution of permissibility over or, which is a puzzling feature of free-choice permission is just one instance of a more general class of conjunctive occurrences of the word, and that these conjunctive uses are more directly explicable by the consideration that or is a descendant of oper than by reference to the disjunctive occurrences which logicalist prejudices may tempt us to regard as semantically more fundamental. I offer an account of how the disjunctive uses of (...)
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  6. R. E. Jennings, J. M. Pelham & R. R. O'Toole (1988). Modal Undefinability in Some Alternative Leibnizian Frames. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 34 (1):19-24.
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  7. R. E. Jennings (1986). Intrinsicality and the Conditional. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):221 - 238.
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  8. R. E. Jennings (1986). The Punctuational Sources of the Truth-Functional 'Or'. Philosophical Studies 50 (2):237-259.
  9. R. E. Jennings (1985). Can There Be a Natural Deontic Logic? Synthese 65 (2):257 - 273.
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  10. R. E. Jennings (1984). Introduction. Topoi 3 (1):1-1.
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  11. R. E. Jennings & P. K. Schotch (1984). The Preservation of Coherence. Studia Logica 43 (1-2):89 - 106.
    It is argued that the preservation of truth by an inference relation is of little interest when premiss sets are contradictory. The notion of a level of coherence is introduced and the utility of modal logics in the semantic representation of sets of higher coherence levels is noted. It is shown that this representative role cannot be transferred to first order logic via frame theory since the modal formulae expressing coherence level restrictions are not first order definable. Finally, an inference (...)
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  12. R. E. Jennings (1981). A Note on the Axiomatisation of Brouwersche Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 10 (3):341 - 343.
  13. R. E. Jennings & P. K. Schotch (1981). Some Remarks on (Weakly) Weak Modal Logics. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 22 (4):309-314.
  14. R. E. Jennings, P. K. Schotch & D. K. Johnston (1981). The $N$-Adic First-Order Undefinability of the Geach Formula. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 22 (4):375-378.
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  15. P. K. Schotch & R. E. Jennings (1981). Probabilistic Considerations on Modal Semantics. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 22 (3):227-238.
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  16. P. K. Schotch & R. E. Jennings (1981). Epistemic Logic, Skepticism, and Non-Normal Modal Logic. Philosophical Studies 40 (1):47 - 67.
    An epistemic logic is built up on the basis of an analysis of two skeptical arguments. the method used is to first construct an inference relation appropriate to epistemic contexts and introduce "a knows that..." as an operator giving rise to sentences closed with respect to this new concept of inference. soundness and completeness proofs are provided using auxiliary three-valued valuations.
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  17. R. E. Jennings, D. K. Johnston & P. K. Schotch (1980). Universal First‐Order Definability in Modal Logic. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 26 (19‐21):327-330.
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  18. P. K. Schotch & R. E. Jennings (1980). Inference and Necessity. Journal of Philosophical Logic 9 (3):327-340.
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  19. P. K. Schotch & R. E. Jennings (1980). Modal Logic and the Theory of Modal Aggregation. Philosophia 9 (2):265-278.
  20. R. E. Jennings (1974). A Utilitarian Semantics for Deontic Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 3 (4):445 - 456.
    I am idebted to members of the Wellington Logic Seminar for useful discussions of work of which this essay forms part, in particular to M. J. Cresswell for comments in the earlier stages of the investigation and to R. I. Goldblatt who suggested the definition ofB infD supu and made numerous other suggestions.
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  21. R. E. Jennings (1974). Pseudo-Subjectivism in Ethics. Dialogue 13 (03):515-518.
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  22. R. E. Jennings (1968). Corrigenda: Preference and Choice as Logical Correlates. Mind 77 (306):289.
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  23. R. E. Jennings (1967). Preference and Choice as Logical Correlates. Mind 76 (304):556-567.
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  24. R. E. Jennings (1966). Or. Analysis 26 (6):181 - 184.
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  25. R. E. Jennings (1965). Purpleness: A Reply to Mr. Roxbee Cox. Analysis 25 (3):62 - 65.
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