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  1. Robert Forman (2014). Riding the Ox Back Home: The Nature of the Everyday Mystical. Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (3-4):104-125.
    Whereas much has been written about the aetiology of transient mystical experiences, there has been too little analysis of the nature of the longer term and permanent shifts known generally as enlightenment, moksha, nirvana, or sometimes Christ Consciousness. This paper identifies two major and relatively common phases of such shifts. The Dualistic Mystical State is a permanent interior stillness that is maintained while one is either at rest or engaged in thought or activity. Five reasons are offered for the hypothesis (...)
     
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  2. Robert Kc Forman (2010). A Conference and a Question1. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (5-6):183-88.
  3. Robert Forman (2008). A Watershed Event. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):110-115.
    Neuroscience, Consciousness and Spirituality Conference, July 2-4, 2008, Freiburg Germany.
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  4. Jensine Andresen & Robert Kc Forman (2000). Cognitive Models and Spiritual Maps. Journal of Consciousness Studies. Controversies in Science and the Humanities, Special Edition 7 (11-12):4-287.
  5. R. Forman (1998). Mystical Consciousness, the Innate Capacity and the Perennial Psychology. In Robert K. C. Forman (ed.), The Innate Capacity: Mysticism, Psychology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 3--44.
     
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  6. R. Forman (1998). What Does Mysticism Have to Teach Us About Consciousness? In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press. 185-201.
    One of the most exciting aspects of this journal, of which I am proud to be an executive editor, is that it has become a venue in which so many distinct fields can interact on a single question, that of consciousness. I know of no other question, or journal, which has brought together so many voices, from so many fields, to swirl around a single topic. It is exciting both to provide a forum and to be a part of this (...)
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  7. Robert K. C. Forman (ed.) (1998). The Innate Capacity: Mysticism, Psychology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This is a sequel to Forman's well-received collection, The Problems of Pure Consciousness (OUP 1990). The essays in this previous volume argued that some mystical experiences do not seem to be formed or shaped by the language system--a thesis that stands in sharp contrast to the constructivist school, which holds that all mysticism is the product of a cultural and linguistic process. In The Innate Capacity, the same scholars put forward a hypothesis about the formative causes of these "pure consciousness" (...)
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  8. Robert Kc Forman (1998). A What Can Mysticism Teach Us About Consciousness? In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Ii. Mit Press. 53.
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  9. R. Forman (1996). Adrian Kuzminski, The Soul. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3:181-182.
     
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  10. Robert K. C. Forman (1996). Of Heapers, Splitters and Academic Woodpiles in the Study of Intense Religious Experiences. Sophia 35 (1):73-100.
    This paper is a revised version of a talk I delivered to the American Academy of Religion Mysticism Group's Panel on Attachments and Letting Go, San Francisco, November, 1992.
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  11. Robert Kc Forman (1994). Of Capsules and Carts: Mysticism, Language and the Via Negativa. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):38-49.
    While a surprising number of people, both religious and non-religious, have had deep and significant mystical experiences, scholars have reached little agreement about their cause and character. Many analyze mystical experiences as if they are formed by the same linguistic processes that shape ordinary experiences. This paper shows that this is based on a misunderstanding, for these experiences result from letting go of language. The paper concludes that we need to think about mystical experiences - and what they have to (...)
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  12. Robert K. C. Forman (1993). Of Deserts and Doors: Methodology of the Study of Mysticism. [REVIEW] Sophia 32 (1):31-44.
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  13. Robert K. C. Forman (1992). Jonathan Shear. The Inner Dimension: Philosophy and The Experience of Consciousness. Pp. 243. (New York: Peter Lang, 1990.) $46.00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 28 (2):275.
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  14. Robert K. C. Forman (1991). Mystical Consciousness. Sophia 30 (2-3):55-58.
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  15. Robert K. C. Forman (1991). Reply: Bagger and the Ghosts of Gaa. Religious Studies 27 (3):413 - 420.
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  16. R. Forman (ed.) (1990). The Problem of Pure Consciousness: Mysticism and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Are mystical experiences primarily formed by the mystic's cultural background and concepts, as modern day "constructivists" maintain, or do mystics in some way transcend language, belief, and culturally conditioned expectations? Do mystical experiences differ in the different religious traditions, as "pluralists" contend, or are they identical across cultures? Twelve contributors here attempt to answer these questions through close examination of a particular form of mystical experience, "Pure Consciousness"--the experience of being awake but devoid of intentional content for consciousness. The contributors (...)
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  17. R. K. Forman (1990). C, Ed. In R. Forman (ed.), The Problem of Pure Consciousness: Mysticism and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  18. Robert Kc Forman (1990). Introduction: Mysticism, Constructivism, and Forgetting. In R. Forman (ed.), The Problem of Pure Consciousness: Mysticism and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  19. Robert K. C. Forman (1989). Paramārtha and Modern Constructivists on Mysticism: Epistemological Monomorphism Versus Duomorphism. Philosophy East and West 39 (4):393-418.
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  20. Robert K. C. Forman (1988). The Construction of Mystical Experience. Faith and Philosophy 5 (3):254-267.
    Capitalizing on the constructivist approach developed by philosophers and psychologists, Steven Katz argues that mystical experience is in part constructed, shaped and colored by the concepts and beliefs which the mystic brings to it. Merits and problems of this constructivist account of mysticism are discussed. The approach is seen to be ill-suited to explain the novelties and surprises for which mysticism is renowned. A new model is suggested: that mysticism is produced by a process similar to forgetting. Two forms of (...)
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