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  1. Tom L. Beauchamp & R. G. Frey (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Edited by Tom L. Beauchamp and R.G. Frey.
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  2. R. G. Frey (2010). Ending Life. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge
     
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  3. R. G. Frey (2010). Goals, Luck, and Moral Obligation. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):297-316.
    In Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy, Bernard Williams is rather severe on what he thinks of as an ethics of obligation. He has in mind by this Kant and W. D. Ross. For many, obligation seems the very core of ethics and the moral realm, and lives more generally are seen through the prism of this notion. This, according to Williams, flattens out our lives and moral experience and fails to take into account things which are obviously important to (...)
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  4. R. G. Frey (2008). Rights, Interests, Desires and Beliefs. In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), American Philosophical Quarterly. Routledge 233 - 239.
  5. Louis I. Katzner & R. G. Frey (2006). James W. Child, 1941-2005. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 79 (5):117 - 118.
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  6. R. G. Frey (2005). Animals. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics. OUP Oxford
     
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  7. R. G. Frey (2005). Intending and Causing. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):465 - 474.
    In much of the contemporary discussion of end of life cases, active killing is forbidden doctors, whereas the passive bringing about of death is, e.g., a rather common occurrence in our hospitals. In the former sorts of cases, doctors are held to be causes of death; in the latter sorts of cases, they are held not to be. If they did not cause a death, even though they did (...)
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  8. R. G. Frey (2005). Pain, Vivisection, and the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):202-204.
    Pain alone does not settle the issue of vivisectionIn his paper, Lab animals and the art of empathy, David Thomas presents his case against animal experimentation. That case is a rather unusual one in certain respects. It turns upon the fact that, for Thomas, nothing can be proved or established in ethics, with the result that what we are left to operate with, apart from assumptions about cases that we might choose to make, are people’s feelings. We cannot show or (...)
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  9. R. G. Frey (2004). Tom Regan, Defending Animal Rights:Defending Animal Rights. Ethics 114 (2):372-373.
  10. R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2003). A Companion to Applied Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
  11. R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2003). Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. Blackwell.
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  12. R. G. Frey (2002). Human Use of Non‐Human Animals: A Philosopher's Perspective. In J. A. Bryant, Linda Baggott la Velle & John Searle (eds.), Bioethics for Scientists. Wiley 101--111.
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  13. Vere Chappell, Dorothy Coleman, Timothy Costelloe, Lisa Downing, James Dye, Daniel Flage, R. G. Frey, James King & Beryl Logan (2001). Hume Studies Referees, 2000-2001. Hume Studies 27 (2):371-372.
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  14. R. G. Frey (2001). David DeGrazia, Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status:Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status. Ethics 111 (3):625-627.
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  15. R. G. Frey (2001). R. M. Hare, Sorting Out Ethics:Sorting Out Ethics. Ethics 112 (1):158-159.
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  16. Gerald Dworkin, R. G. Frey & Sissela Bok (2000). Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide-For and Against. Mind 109 (436):893-896.
     
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  17. R. G. Frey (2000). Privacy, Control, and Talk of Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (02):45-.
    An alleged moral right to informational privacy assumes that we should have control over information about ourselves. What is the philosophical justification for this control? I think that one prevalent answer to this question—an answer that has to do with the justification of negative rights generally—will not do.
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  18. R. G. Frey, Brad Hooker, F. M. Kamm, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, David McNaughton, Jan Narveson, Michael Slote, Alison M. Jaggar & William R. Schroeder (2000). Normative Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers
     
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  19. R. G. Frey (1999). Hume on Suicide. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):336 – 351.
    Anyone interested in the morality of suicide reads David Hume's essay on the subject even today. There are numerous reasons for this, but the central one is that it sets up the starting point for contemporary debate about the morality of suicide, namely, the debate about whether some condition of life could present one with a morally acceptable reason for autonomously deciding to end one's life. We shall only be able to have this debate if we think that at least (...)
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  20. Gerald Dworkin, R. G. Frey & Sissela Bok (1998). Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide. Cambridge University Press.
    The moral issues involved in doctors assisting patients to die with dignity are of absolutely central concern to the medical profession, ethicists, and the public at large. The debate is fuelled by cases that extend far beyond passive euthanasia to the active consideration of killing by physicians. The need for a sophisticated but lucid exposition of the two sides of the argument is now urgent. This book supplies that need. Two prominent philosophers, Gerald Dworkin and R. G. Frey present the (...)
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  21. R. G. Frey (1996). Medicine, Animal Experimentation, and the Moral Problem of Unfortunate Humans. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (02):181-.
    We live in an age of great scientific and technological innovation, and what seemed out of the question or at least very doubtful only a few years ago, today lies almost within our grasp. In no area is this more true than that of human health care, where lifesaving and life-enhancing technologies have given, or have the enormous potential in the not so distant future to give, relief from some of the most terrible human illnesses. On two fronts in particular, (...)
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  22. R. G. Frey (1996). Response: Autonomy, Animals, and Conceptions of The Good. Between the Species 12 (1):4.
  23. R. G. Frey (1996). The Ethics of Animal and Human Experimentation. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):252-253.
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  24. R. G. Frey (1995). Virtue, Commerce, and Self-Love. Hume Studies 21 (2):275-287.
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  25. R. G. Frey (1993). Book Review:Against Liberation: Putting Animals in Perspective Michael P. T. Leahy. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (4):834-.
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  26. R. G. Frey & Christopher Morris (eds.) (1993). Value, Welfare, and Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses critical issues in normative ethical theory. Every such theory must contain not only a theory of motivation but also a theory of value, and the link that is often forged between what is valuable and what would be right is human welfare or well-being. This topic is a subject of considerable controversy in contemporary ethics, not least because of the current reconsideration of utilitarianism. Indeed, there is as much disagreement about the nature of value and its relationship (...)
     
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  27. R. G. Frey (1992). Butler on Self-Love and Benevolence. In Christopher Cunliffe (ed.), Joseph Butler's Moral and Religious Thought: Tercentenary Essays. Oxford University Press 243--67.
     
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  28. R. G. Frey (1992). Book Review:The Utilitarian Response: The Contemporary Viability of Utilitarian Political Philosophy. Lincoln Allison. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (2):411-.
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  29. R. G. Frey & Christopher W. Morris (eds.) (1991). Liability and Responsibility: Essays in Law and Morals. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of contemporary essays by a group of well-known philosophers and legal theorists covers various topics in the philosophy of law, focusing on issues concerning liability in contract, tort, and criminal law. The book is divided into four sections. The first provides a conceptual overview of the issues at stake in a philosophical discussion of liability and responsibility. The second, third, and fourth sections present, in turn, more detailed explorations of the roles of notions of liability and responsibility in (...)
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  30. R. G. Frey (1990). Animals, Science, and Morality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22.
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  31. R. G. Frey (1989). Book Review:Morals, Reasons, and Animals. S. F. Sapontzis. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (1):191-.
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  32. R. G. Frey (1987). Autonomy and the Value of Animal Life. The Monist 70 (1):50-63.
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  33. R. G. Frey (1987). Theories of Rights. Philosophical Books 28 (2):102-105.
  34. R. G. Frey (1986). Autonomy and Conceptions of the Good Life. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 8:124-136.
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  35. R. G. Frey (1986). All That Dwell Therein. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):78-79.
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  36. R. G. Frey (1986). Critical Notice of Rights, Killing and Suffering: Moral Vegetarianism and Applied Ethics. Between the Species 2 (2):7.
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  37. R. G. Frey (1986). Michael Slote, Common-Sense Morality and Consequentialism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (5):247-249.
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  38. R. G. Frey (1986). Rights, Killing, and Suffering: Moral Vegetarianism and Applied Ethics. Philosophical Review 95 (2):277-279.
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  39. R. G. Frey (1985). Schetller, S., "The Rejection of Consequentialism". [REVIEW] Mind 94:146.
     
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  40. R. G. Frey, Mary Midgley & Tom Regan (1985). Rights, Killing, and Suffering. Ethics 96 (1):192-195.
     
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  41. R. G. FRey (1984). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 93 (371):444-446.
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  42. R. G. Frey (1984). Social Conflict and Resolution. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 6:1-16.
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  43. R. G. Frey (1984). "Utilitarianism and Beyond", Edited by A. Sen and B. Williams. [REVIEW] Mind 93:444.
     
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  44. R. G. Frey (ed.) (1984). Utility and Rights. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Eight of the eleven essays were written expressly for this book; all of the authors are deeply engaged in the debate over utility and rights, and their essays build upon and extend current thinking on the subject.
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  45. R. G. Frey (1983). Response. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):104-104.
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  46. R. G. Frey (1983). REGAN, D. H. "Utilitarianism and Co-Operation". [REVIEW] Mind 92:296.
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  47. R. G. Frey (1983). Returning to Eden: Animal Rights and Human Responsibility. Environmental Ethics 5 (1):83-89.
  48. R. G. Frey (1983). Returning to Eden. Environmental Ethics 5 (1):83-89.
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  49. R. G. Frey (1983). Sex, Drugs, Death, and the Law. Philosophical Books 24 (4):234-236.
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  50. R. G. Frey (1983). Vivisection, Morals and Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):94-97.
    If one wishes to accept that some painful animal experimentation can be justified on grounds that benefit is conferred, one is faced with a difficult moral dilemma argues the first author, a philosopher. Either one needs to be able to say why human lives of any quality however low should be inviolable from painful experimentation when animal lives are not; or one should accept that sufficient benefit can justify certain painful experiments on human beings of sufficiently low quality of life. (...)
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