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  1. R. G. Twycross (1982). Bereavement Visiting. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (2):104-104.
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  2. R. G. Twycross (1982). Debate: Euthanasia--A Physician's Viewpoint. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (2):86-95.
    Discussion about euthanasia is often confused because of a failure to distinguish between deliberate death acceleration and letting nature take its course. There is a need to reiterate the traditional principles upon which the care of the dying should be based, including the need for the doctor to practise medicine in the knowledge that eventually all his patients will die. It follows that a doctor does not have a duty to preserve life at all costs. The care of the patient (...)
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  3. R. G. Twycross (1982). Response. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (2):95-95.
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  4. R. G. Twycross (1978). The Assessment of Pain in Advanced Cancer. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (3):112-116.
    This is one of a group of papers read at the London Medical Group conference of "Pain: a necessity?",' which was held in Charing Cross Hospital Medical School, London in February 1978. Dr Twycross argues that complete assessment implies the ability not only to make a diagnosis but also to initiate appropriate treatment. Describing the site, severity and quality of the pain is only the first step. A doctor needs to: 1) Be aware of the range of diagnostic possibilities 2) (...)
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  5. J. M. Hunt, T. D. Stollar, D. W. Littlejohns, R. G. Twycross & D. W. Vere (1977). Patients with Protracted Pain: A Survey Conducted at The London Hospital. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (2):61-73.
    Physical pain has always been part of human experience, and throughout history it is recorded that doctors and wise men and women have sought to ease pain. The attitudes of those suffering pain, however, have varied from stoical acceptance to sullen endurance. Today, most people consciously seek to avoid pain or to have their pain eased, although they do not always expect what in fact appears to be possible. This study of 13 patients with protracted pain was carried out at (...)
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  6. A. G. Flew & R. G. Twycross (1975). Letter: Active and Passive Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):153-153.
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  7. R. G. Twycross (1975). The Use of Narcotic Analgesics in Terminal Illness. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (1):10-17.
    To answer some of the questions surrounding the medicinal use of narcotic analgesics in advanced cancer, a group of 500 patients admitted to St Christopher's Hospice was reviewed. To achieve and maintain pain relief many of the patients received diamorphine (heroin) regularly every four hours. Almost all the patients received a phenothiazine concurrently; other drugs were prescribed when indicated. It was concluded that: 1) Although most patients receive parenteral diamorphine during the last 12 to 24 hours, the majority can be (...)
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