57 found
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  1. K. Bach & R. Harnish (1979). Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts. MIT Press.
  2.  5
    Robert J. Weber & Roger Harnish (1974). Visual Imagery for Words: The Hebb Test. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):409-414.
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  3. Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1992). How Performatives Really Work: A Reply to Searle. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (1):93 - 110.
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  4. Robert M. Harnish (ed.) (2001). Minds, Brains, Computers: An Historical Introduction to the Foundations of Cognitive Science. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Minds, Brains, Computers_ serves as both an historical and interdisciplinary introduction to the foundations of cognitive science.
     
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  5.  15
    Robert M. Harnish (2005). Folk Psychology and Literal Meaning. Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (2):383-400.
    Recanati (2004), Literal Meaning argues against what he calls ¿literalism¿ and for what he calls ¿contextualism¿. He considers a wide spectrum of positions and arguments from relevance theory to hidden variables theory. In the end, however, he seems to hold that semantic and pragmatic theorizing must answer to broadly introspective or folk psychological constraints ¿ they don¿t exist in ¿heaven¿. After surveying Recanati¿s wide-ranging and provocative discussion of these issues, we wonder why parity of reasoning does not condemn syntax and (...)
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  6. Robert M. Harnish (1994). Mood, Meaning and Speech Acts. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), Foundations of Speech Act Theory: Philosophical and Linguistic Perspectives. Routledge 407--459.
     
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  7.  15
    Robert M. Harnish & Christian Plunze (2006). Illocutionary Rules. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):37-52.
    The idea that speaking a language is a rule- (or convention-)governed form of behavior goes back at least to Wittgenstein¿s language-game analogy, and can be found most prominently in the work of Searle and Alston. Both theorists have a conception of illocutionary rules as putting illocutionary conditions on utterance acts. We argue that this conception of illocutionary rules is inadequate ¿ it does not meet intuitively plausible conditions of adequacy for the description of illocutionary acts. Nor are illocutionary rules as (...)
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  8.  33
    Robert M. Harnish (1977). Searle on Katz's Semantic Theory. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):23-32.
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  9.  15
    Robert M. Harnish (1994). What is the Sense of Phos and Hes? Grazer Philosophische Studien 47:185-196.
    Frege's puzzle for demonstratives is accounting for the cognitive significance of identity statements containing demonstratives, such as "That [demonstration-1] is identical to that [demonstration-2]". Since the demonstrative 'that' makes the same semantic contribution (has the same 'character') on both occurrences, the difference must be due to the cognitive significance or 'senses' of the associated demonstrations. But what is the sense of a demonstration? Kaplan's suggested solutions in terms of gestures and appearances are not compatible with his general theory, and do (...)
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  10.  11
    Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1987). Relevant Questions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):711.
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  11.  28
    Robert M. Harnish (2003). Frege and the Logic of Sense and Reference. Review of Metaphysics 56 (4):886-887.
  12. Robert Harnish (2003). John Perry, Reference and Reflexivity. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 23:135-138.
     
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  13.  19
    Robert M. Harnish (2005). Commitments and Speech Acts. Philosophica 75.
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  14.  6
    Robert M. Harnish (2007). Frege on Direct Quotation. Essays in Philosophy 8 (1):8.
    In a single short passage in "On Sense and Reference" Frege outlines his conception of direct quotation wherein words must not be taken as having their customary reference, but rather refer to the words themselves or the words of another speaker. What unifies these uses? What is the logical form of direct quotation sentences, and what is their analysis? How does this view fit in with Frege's general semantics? How far can it be extended? What problems does it face? We (...)
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  15. Robert M. Harnish & Denise D. Cummins (eds.) (2000). Minds, Brains, and Computers: An Historical Introduction to the Foundations of Cognitive Science. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Minds, Brains, and Computers_ presents a vital resource -- the most comprehensive interdisciplinary selection of seminal papers in the foundations of cognitive science, from leading figures in artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience.
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  16.  27
    Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1983). Review. [REVIEW] Synthese 54 (3):469-493.
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  17.  23
    Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1982). Katz as Katz Can. Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):168-171.
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  18. Robert M. Harnish (1994). Basic Topics in the Philosophy of Language.
     
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  19.  4
    Robert M. Harnish (2009). The Problem of Fragments: Two Interpretative Strategies. Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (2):251-282.
    We do not always talk in complete sentences; we sometimes speak in “fragments“, such as `Fire!', `Off with his head', `From Cuba', `Next!', and `Shall we?'. Research has tended to focus on the ellipsis wars — the issue of whether all or most fragments are really sentential or not. Less effort has been put into the question of exactly how fragments are to be interpreted, especially their force. We separate off the issue of fragment interpretation from the issue of systematically (...)
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  20.  5
    Robert M. Harnish (1980). Words and Deeds: Problems in the Theory of Speech Acts by David Holdcroft. Journal of Philosophy 77 (8):495-501.
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  21.  4
    Robert Cummins & Robert M. Harnish (1980). The Language Faculty and the Interpretation of Linguistics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):18.
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  22. Robert M. Harnish (2002). Harold W. Noonan, Frege: A Critical Introduction Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (6):434-436.
     
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  23.  16
    Robert M. Harnish (2002). Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning William P. Alston Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2000, Xiii + 327 Pp., $48.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (3):589.
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  24. Robert M. Harnish (2003). John Perry, Reference and Reflexivity Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (2):135-138.
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  25.  18
    Robert M. Harnish (1983). Pragmatic Derivations. Synthese 54 (3):325 - 373.
    In this paper I have tried to give the SAS some descriptive content with respect to English. I have suggested that correlations of form, function and fit play a central role in accounting for understanding literal and direct communication, and I have tried to take some initial steps towards constructing a plausible theory of such communication incorporating these notions.As with any developing theory, the SAS has a long way to grow. Among the problem areas that need further work are the (...)
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  26.  7
    Robert M. Harnish (1976). Two Consequences of Transparent Subject Position. Philosophical Studies 30 (1):11 - 18.
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  27.  5
    Merrill Garrett & Robert M. Harnish (2007). Experimental Pragmatics: Testing for Implicitures. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 15 (1):65-90.
    Grice proposed to investigate 'the total signification of the utterance'. One persistent criticism of Grice's taxonomy of signification is that he missed an important category of information. This content, and/or the process of providing it, goes by a variety of labels: 'generalized implicature', 'explicature', 'unarticulated constituents', 'default heuristics', 'impliciture'. In this study we first take a sample of such phenomena and, from the point of view of pure pragmatics, survey the central descriptions of the content expressed and the mechanisms that (...)
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  28.  5
    Robert M. Harnish (1995). Modularity and Speech Acts. Pragmatics and Cognition 3 (1):1-29.
    Modules, as Marr and Fodor conceive of them, lie between sensory and central processes. Modules have the functional property of representing that portion of the world which turns them on, and nine non-functional or structural properties that facilitate carrying out that function. Fodor has proposed that the processing of linguistic information is carried out by a language module , which therefore has the functional and structural features of modules. We argue that the proposed LM does not have the functional property (...)
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  29.  1
    Robert M. Harnish (2005). Folk Psychology and Literal Meaning. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 13 (2):383-399.
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  30.  3
    Robert M. Harnish (2011). François Recanati , Truth-Conditional Pragmatics . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (4):301-304.
  31. Robert M. Harnish (2002). Joseph Salerno, On Frege Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (4):307-308.
     
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  32.  1
    Robert M. Harnish (2003). Speech Acts. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group
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  33.  1
    Robert M. Harnish (2011). Uli Sauerland and Kasuko Yatsushiro, Eds. , Semantics and Pragmatics: From Experiment to Theory . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (6):425-427.
  34. Robert M. Harnish & Denise D. Cummins (eds.) (2000). Minds, Brains, and Computers. John Wiley & Sons.
    _Minds, Brains, and Computers_ presents a vital resource -- the most comprehensive interdisciplinary selection of seminal papers in the foundations of cognitive science, from leading figures in artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience.
     
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  35. Robert M. Harnish (2004). Arthur Sullivan, Ed., Logicism and the Philosophy of Language: Selections From Frege and Russell Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (5):379-382.
     
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  36. R. M. Harnish (1996). Consciousness, Cognitivism and Computation: A Reply to Searle. Conceptus: Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie 29 (75):229-249.
     
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  37. Robert M. Harnish (1993). Communicating with Proverbs. Communication and Cognition. Monographies 26 (3-4):265-290.
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  38. Robert M. Harnish (2001). Grasping Modes of Presentation: Frege Vs Fodor and Schweizer. Acta Analytica 25:19-46.
     
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  39. Robert M. Harnish (2009). G. Preyer and G. Peter, Eds., Context-Sensitivity and Semantic Minimalism. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):367.
     
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  40. Robert Harnish (2002). Harold W. Noonan, Frege: A Critical Introduction. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 22:434-436.
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  41. Robert M. Harnish & Christian Plunze (2006). Illocutionary Rules. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):37-52.
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  42. Robert Harnish (2002). Joseph Salerno, On Frege. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 22:307-308.
     
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  43. Robert M. Harnish & Francois Recanati (1991). Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances. Philosophical Review 100 (2):297.
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  44. Robert M. Harnish (1995). Modularity and Speech Acts. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 3 (1):1-29.
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  45. Robert M. Harnish (2001). Minds, Brains, Computers: An Historical Introduction to the Foundations of Cognitive Science. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Minds, Brains, Computers_ serves as both an historical and interdisciplinary introduction to the foundations of cognitive science.
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  46. Robert M. Harnish (2001). Minds, Brains, Computers: An Historical Introduction to the Foundations of Cognitive Science. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Minds, Brains, Computers_ serves as both an historical and interdisciplinary introduction to the foundations of cognitive science.
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  47. Robert Harnish (2009). Michael Morris, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Philosophy in Review 29 (1):52.
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  48. Robert M. Harnish (2001). Nick Fotion, John Searle Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (5):332-334.
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  49. Robert Harnish (2001). Nick Fotion, John Searle. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 21:332-334.
     
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  50. Robert M. Harnish & Jerrold J. Katz (1983). Propositional Structure and Illocutionary Force: A Study of the Contribution of Sentence Meaning to Speech Acts. Philosophical Review 92 (1):103.
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