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Profile: Robert Johnson (University of Missouri, Columbia)
Profile: Rolf Johnson
Profile: Rachel Johnson
Profile: Robin Johnson
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Profile: Rianna Johnson (Nottingham University)
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Profile: Ryan Johnson (Duquesne University)
Profile: Rachel Johnson (University of California, Los Angeles)
  1. Robert Johnson, Moral Indifference.
    opposed ways. 6:408-9 Understood as "moral apathy", to be indifferent is to be uninfluenced..
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  2. Robert Johnson, Kantian Irrealism.
    Kantian ethics can at times appear to defend the position that there is a unique sort of value that plays a foundational role in morality. For instance, Kant's most well known work in ethics, the Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals, begins by trying to establish that a good will is good without qualification' and then ends with a first statement of the fundamental principle that divides right from wrong, the Categorical Imperative.1 This presentation can make it seems as if (...)
     
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  3. Robert Johnson, Merit.
    A few pages into the Groundwork Kant claims that only actions from duty have moral worth.ii Even though as an aside he also says that a dutiful action from sympathy or honor, though lacking in moral worth, "deserves praise and encouragement", it is tempting not to take him very seriously. One suspects that he regards this praise as only a poor and morally insignificant cousin of the esteem reserved for actions from duty. In the end, it seems hard to avoid (...)
     
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  4. Robert Johnson, Obligation.
    Since Plato wrote of political obligation in his dialogue Crito, obligation in general has been of ongoing interest to philosophers. In that dialogue, Socrates argues that he was under an obligation to obey the laws of Athens and comply with a sentence of death. During the course of the argument, he raises and offers solutions to many of the central issues about obligation that philosophers still puzzle over. For instance, how can obligations have the grip on us that they do—in (...)
     
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  5. Robert Johnson, Relativism.
    Although relativism is most often associated with ethics, one can find defenses of relativism in virtually any area of philosophy. In what follows, I will narrow my focus considerably. I first discuss the general structure of relativist positions and arguments. I will then examine several influential ideas concerning relativism in the late 20th century. Finally, I end by considering the rise of relativism in one area outside of ethics, epistemology.
     
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  6. Robert Johnson, Self-Development as an Imperfect Duty.
    'You ought to make something of yourself.' That certainly has the ring of truth about it. But is there really any obligation to develop yourself? Those who let abilities lie idle are shortsighted, of course. But are they guilty of anything more than imprudence? It is easy to think that there could be a moral fault in failing to help others such as your children to develop their talents and abilities. But what about not developing your own? And if this (...)
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  7. Robert Johnson, The Good of Self-Development.
    So Michael Slote argues. There is and can be no obligation to foster one's own wellbeing for Kantians, only an obligation to foster the wellbeing of others. And any distinctively Kantian position both denies that our own wellbeing is the source of our moral duties and denies that a concern for wellbeing can be a morally worthy motive. So not only is the agent's own good not foundational to morality; it is of no moral importance. Hence, Slote concludes, the devaluation (...)
     
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  8. R. L. Johnson (forthcoming). Contemporary Perspectives in Machine Translation. Contrastes.
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  9. Ralph H. Johnson (forthcoming). The Place of Argumentation in the Theory of Reasoning. Communication and Cognition.
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  10. Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair (forthcoming). The Recent Development of Informal Logic. Informal Logic: The First International Symposium.
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  11. Richard Johnson (forthcoming). Solar Eclipses at Tikal, AD 0010 to AD 1600: With Lunar Intervals. Manuscrito. Forth Worth.
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  12. Rob Johnson, Edward G. McFarland, W. Ben Kibler, D. Greg Anderson, Gregory A. Helm, Mark K. Bowen & Gordon W. Nuber (forthcoming). The Clinics Are Now Available Online! Ethics.
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  13. Mark Timmons & Robert Johnson (eds.) (forthcoming). Value, Reason, and Respect: Kantian Themes From the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr. Oxford.
    The book features chapters by Bernard and Jan Boxill, Robin S. Dillon, Stephen Darwall, Mark Schroeder, Jonathan Dancy, Onora O’Neill, Gerald Gaus, Jeffrie G. Murphy, Matt Zwolinski and David Schmidtz, Cheshire Calhoun, Marcia Baron, Andrews Reath, and Julia Driver that take up themes and arguments in Tom Hill’s work in ethics, social, political and legal philosophy, as well as his work on Kant’s ethics. The volume concludes with an essay by Tom Hill in which he reflects on how he came (...)
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  14. Ryan Johnson (2014). Machinery, Monstrosity, and Bestiality: An Analysis of Repulsion in Kierkegaard's Practice in Christianity. Heythrop Journal 55 (5):903-915.
    In reaction to a particularly scathing review of his Practice in Christianity, Kierkegaard postulated what he called a ‘preacher-machine.’ As we will see, the preacher-machine is only one type of character-machine, for, in Practice in Christianity, there are five other such machines. Starting up these character-machines will allow for an analysis of the repulsion of the God-man, Christ himself. This repulsion is important because Kierkegaard claims that it is the condition for the emergence of faith. After discussing repulsion, Kierkegaard will (...)
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  15. Ryan J. Johnson (2014). Another Use of the Concept of the Simulacrum: Deleuze, Lucretius and the Practical Critique of Demystification. Deleuze Studies 8 (1):70-93.
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  16. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (2013). A List of Trudy Govier's Publications. Informal Logic 33 (2):332-341.
    The Editors thank Ken Peacock for his assistance.
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  17. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (2013). Preface. Informal Logic 33 (2):81-82.
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  18. Ralph H. Johnson (2013). Govier's "Invention" of the Theory of Argument. Informal Logic 33 (2):98-115.
    In this paper, I propose that the inquiry known as a/the theory of argument is the “invention” of Trudy Govier, using that term in its rhetorical sense, viz., the process of choosing ideas appropriate to the subject. In her (1987) paper, “Is a Theory of Argument Possible?” Govier used the idea of theory of argument to focus her discussion on problems in argument analysis and evaluation that came to light in the 1970s and 1980s. The idea of a theory of (...)
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  19. Ralph H. Johnson (2013). The Role of Audience in Argumentation From the Perspective of Informal Logic. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (4):533-549.
    One of the distinctive features of rhetorical approaches to the study of argumentation is the emphasis placed on the role of the audience. Here one thinks immediately of the influence of Chaïm Perelman and of his and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca’s The New Rhetoric. There is something importantly right about an audience-centered approach to argumentation. Clearly if you wish to persuade an audience of your position (or gain the acceptance of your thesis), you must engage that audience and in some sense carry (...)
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  20. Ralph H. Johnson & Christopher W. Tindale (2013). Introduction. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (4):379-391.
    When considering the interactions between rhetoric and argumentation, readers of this journal will no doubt be reminded of the seminal work of Henry W. Johnstone Jr. (1959; 1978) who gathered both concerns together in ways that were designed to engage philosophers and persuade them of the intellectual seriousness of both enterprises. He was, of course, a principal force among those who brought Chaïm Perelman’s work to the attention of audiences in North America, and he himself entered into deep and fruitful (...)
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  21. Rebecca J. Johnson (2013). Maintaining Discipline in Detainee Operations: Avoiding the Slippery Slope to Abuse. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (4):360 - 362.
    (2012). MAINTAINING DISCIPLINE IN DETAINEE OPERATIONS: AVOIDING THE SLIPPERY SLOPE TO ABUSE. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 11, No. 4, pp. 360-362. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2012.758407.
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  22. Rebekah Johnson (2013). Marriage and the Metaphysics of Bodily Union. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):288-312.
    One current line of argument against the legalization of same-sex marriage, advocated primarily by the New Natural Lawyers, is that marriage is a pre-political institution that has, as an essential element, a bodily union requirement. They argue that same-sex couples cannot realize bodily union in their sexual activities and thus cannot meet the structural requirements of marriage. Accordingly, they argue that the same-sex marriage debate must be framed as a debate about what marriage is, and not, as it was in (...)
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  23. J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson, Hans V. Hansen & Christopher W. Tindale (2012). In Memoriam: Jonathan Adler 1949 – 2012. Informal Logic 32 (2):160.
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  24. Two-Level Eudaimonism, Second-Personal Reasons Two-Level Eudaimonism, Second-Personal Reasons, Anita L. Allen, Jack Balkin, Seyla Benhabib, Talbot Brewer, Peter Cane, Thomas Hurka & Robert N. Johnson (2012). Autonomous Action: Self-Determination in the Passive Mode Autonomous Action: Self-Determination in the Passive Mode (Pp. 647-691). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (4).
     
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  25. Ralph H. Johnson (2012). When Informal Logic Met Critical Thinking. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (3):5-14.
    In this reflection piece, Ralph Johnson provides an account of the development of informal logic and how it intersected with the Critical Thinking Movement. Section I is an account of the origins of what Johnson calls the “Informal Logic Initiative.” Section II discusses how the Informal Logic Initiative connected with the Critical Thinking Movement at the Sonoma State University Conferences starting in 1981. Section III discusses the relationship between logic and critical thinking. Section IV describes “The Network Problem,” which emerged (...)
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  26. RoseMary C. Johnson (2012). Human Tragedy, Divine Comedy. Renascence 64 (2):161-175.
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  27. David W. Johnson & Roger T. Johnson (2011). Intellectual Legacy: Cooperation and Competition. In. In Peter T. Coleman (ed.), Conflict, Interdependence, and Justice. Springer. 41--63.
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  28. Ralph Johnson (2011). The Coherence of Hamblin's Fallacies. Informal Logic 31 (4):305-317.
    Hamblin’s Fallacies remains one of the crucial documents in the development of informal logic and argumentation theory. His critique of traditional approaches to the fallacies (what he dubbed ‘The Standard Treatment’) helped to revitalize the study of fallacies. Recently I had occasion to reread Fallacies and came to the conclusion that some of my earlier criticisms (1989, 1990) had missed the real force of what was going on there, that I and others have perhaps not fully appreciated what Hamblin is (...)
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  29. Robert N. Johnson (2011). Self-Improvement: An Essay in Kantian Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Is there any moral obligation to improve oneself, to foster and develop various capacities in oneself? From a broadly Kantian point of view, Self-Improvement defends the view that there is such an obligation and that it is an obligation that each person owes to him or herself. The defence addresses a range of arguments philosophers have mobilized against this idea, including the argument that it is impossible to owe anything to yourself, and the view that an obligation to improve onself (...)
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  30. Rutherford Johnson (2011). Can Educators Be Motivated by Management by Objective Systems in Academia? Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):1-18.
    The Management by Objective (MBO) system was widely discredited by the 1980s as not delivering on its promises of efficiency, worker motivation, etc. Now some universities around the world seek to employ such a system for faculty evaluation. This paper comments on the reasons the MBO was largely abandoned in the business world, provides the use of the MBO in Korean education as a case study of current use, and gives suggestions of the conditions under which the MBO or similar (...)
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  31. Maja Stikic, Robin R. Johnson, Daniel J. Levendowski, Djordje P. Popovic, Richard E. Olmstead & Chris Berka (2011). Eeg-Derived Estimators of Present and Future Cognitive Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
  32. Douglas Walton & Ralph Johnson (2011). Introduction: Special Issue on Charles Hamblin. Informal Logic 31 (4).
    It is unfortunate that Hamblin’s contributions do not get him the credit he deserves for his remarkable achievements. Although his contributions to philosophy are well enough recognized, and his early contributions to computing have been acknowledged, it seems strange that his work has not been widely enough recognized for the interdisciplinary effect it has had. There has been a feedback loop whereby his theories on formal dialogue systems and imperatives were taken up in argumentation, applied in computing, and then used (...)
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  33. Rebecca J. Johnson (2010). Just Wars and Moral Victories: Surprise, Deception and the Normative Framework of European War in the Later Middle Ages. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (3):286-288.
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  34. Rebecca Page Johnson & Kenneth Strike (2010). Designing School Choice: The Devil's in the Details. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (4):569-577.
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  35. Robert N. Johnson (2010). Duties to and Regarding Others. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  36. Ryan Johnson (2010). The Making of a Tropical Disease: A Short History of Malaria. Annals of Science 67 (1):139-142.
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  37. Mark Levene, Rob Johnson & Richard Maguire (eds.) (2010). History at the End of the World? History, Climate Change and the Possibility of Closure. Humanities-EBooks.
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  38. P. S. Duggan, A. W. Siegel, D. M. Blass, H. Bok, J. T. Coyle, R. Faden, J. Finkel, J. D. Gearhart, H. T. Greely, A. Hillis, A. Hoke, R. Johnson, M. Johnston, J. Kahn, D. Kerr & P. King (2009). Unintended Changes in Cognition, Mood, and Behavior Arising From Cell-Based Interventions for Neurological Conditions: Ethical Challenges. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):31-36.
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  39. Richard Johnson (2009). Gods and Monsters: Religion as a Survival Strategy. Heythrop Journal 50 (5):864-876.
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  40. Robbin Johnson (2009). Commentary: Emerging Technologies Oversight: Research, Regulation, and Commercialization. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):587-593.
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  41. Robert Johnson (2009). Good Will and the Moral Worth of Acting From Duty. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The first section of the Groundwork begins “It is impossible to imagine anything at all in the world, or even beyond it, that can be called good without qualification— except a good will.”1 Kant’s explanation and defense of this claim is followed by an explanation and defense of another related claim, that only actions performed out of duty have moral worth. He explains that actions performed out of duty are those done from respect for the moral law, and then culminates (...)
     
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  42. Robert Johnson (2009). The Moral Law as Causal Law. In Jens Timmermann (ed.), Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Much recent work on Kant's argument that the Categorical Imperative is the fundamental principle of morality has focused on the gap in that argument between the conclusion that rational agents conform to laws that apply to every rational agent, and the requirement contained in the Universal Law of Nature formula.1 While it seems plausible – even trivial– that a rational agent, insofar as she is a rational agent, conforms to whatever laws there are that are valid for all rational agents, (...)
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  43. Barry R. Schlenker, Marisa L. Miller & Ryan M. Johnson (2009). Moral Identity, Integrity, and Personal Responsibility. In Darcia Narvaez & Daniel Lapsley (eds.), Personality, Identity, and Character. Cambridge University Press. 316.
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  44. James L. Wattenbarger, Marvin S. Alkin, Jean Dredsen Gramrs, Paul L. Dressel, Rita S. Saslaw, T. Barr Greenfield, Russell Thornton, Donald M. Scott, William Duffy, Mario D. Fantini, Alan H. Jones & Ruth Brownlee Johnson (2009). Innovation in Education. Educational Studies 3 (3):174-183.
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  45. Rebecca Johnson (2008). Jus Post Bellum and Counterinsurgency. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (3):215-230.
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  46. Richard Johnson (2008). India and Australia: Re-Establishing Old Links. Ethos:8.
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  47. Robert Johnson, Kant's Moral Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) argued that moral requirements are based on a standard of rationality he dubbed the “Categorical Imperative” (CI). Immorality thus involves a violation of the CI and is thereby irrational. Other philosophers, such as Locke and Hobbes, had also argued that moral requirements are based on standards of rationality. However, these standards were either desirebased instrumental principles of rationality or based on sui generis rational intuitions. Kant agreed with many of his predecessors that an analysis of practical reason (...)
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  48. Robert Aaron Johnson (2008). The Most Real Being: A Biblical and Philosophical Defense of Divine Determinism. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):109-112.
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