11 found
Sort by:
  1. G. S. Fischer, J. A. Tulsky & R. M. Arnold (2004). Advance Directives and Advance Health Care Planning. Encyclopedia of Bioethics 1:78-86.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. M. P. Aulisio & R. M. Arnold (2003). Ethics Consultation: In the Service of Practice. Journal of Clinical Ethics 14 (4):276.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. F. Baylis, H. Brody, M. P. Aulisio, D. W. Brock, W. Winslade, R. M. Arnold & S. J. Youngner (2003). Character and Ethics Consultation: Even the Ethicists Don't Agree. In Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold & Stuart J. Youngner (eds.), Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Deborah L. Seltzer, R. M. Arnold & L. A. Siminoff (2000). Are Non-Heart-Beating Cadaver Donors Acceptable to the Public? Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (4):347.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. M. P. Aulisio, R. M. Arnold & S. J. Youngner (1999). Moving the Conversation Forward. Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (1):49.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. M. P. Aulisio & R. M. Arnold (1996). Exclusionary Criteria and Suicidal Behavior: Comment on" Should a Patient Who Attempted Suicide Receive a Liver Transplant"? Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (3):277.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ellen Fox & R. M. Arnold (1995). Evaluating Outcomes in Ethics Consultation Research. Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (2):127-138.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. P. A. Ubel & R. M. Arnold (1994). The Euthanasia Debate and Empirical Evidence: Separating Burdens to Others From One's Own Quality of Life. Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (2):155.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. L. Forrow, R. M. Arnold & J. Frader (1991). Teaching Clinical Ethics in the Residency Years: Preparing Competent Professionals. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (1):93-112.
    Formal training in clinical ethics must become a central part of residency curricula to prepare practitioners to manage the ethical dimensions of patient care. Residency educators must ground their teaching in an understanding of the conceptual, biomedical, and psychosocial aspects of the important ethical issues that arise in that field of practice. Four aspects of professional competence in clinical ethics provide a useful framework for curricular planning. The physician should learn to: (1) recognize ethical issues as they arise in clinical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. E. Fleetwood, R. M. Arnold & R. J. Baron (1989). Giving Answers or Raising Questions?: The Problematic Role of Institutional Ethics Committees. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (3):137-142.
    Institutional ethics committees (IECs) are part of a growing phenomenon in the American health care system. Although a major force driving hospitals to establish IECs is the desire to resolve difficult clinical dilemmas in a quick and systematic way, in this paper we argue that such a goal is naive and, to some extent, misguided. We assess the growing trend of these committees, analyse the theoretical assumptions underlying their establishment, and evaluate their strengths and shortcomings. We show how the 'medical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. R. M. Arnold, L. Forrow, S. A. Wartman & J. Teno (1988). Teaching Clinical Medical Ethics: A Model Programme for Primary Care Residency. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (2):91-96.
    Few residency training programmes explicitly require substantive exposure to issues in medical ethics and fewer still have a formal curriculum in this area. Traditional undergraduate medical ethics courses teach preclinical students to identify ethical issues and analyse them at a theoretical level. Residency training, however, is the ideal time to establish the critical behavioural link which makes ethics truly useful in clinical medicine. The General Internal Medicine Residency Training Program at Rhode Island Hospital has developed an integrated, three-year curriculum with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation