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  1. John W. Du Bois, R. Peter Hobson & Jessica A. Hobson (2014). Dialogic Resonance and Intersubjective Engagement in Autism. Cognitive Linguistics 25 (3):411-441.
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  2. Adam Smith & R. Peter Hobson (2013). Autism, Borderline Personality Disorder, and Empathy. Emotion Review 5 (2):223-224.
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  3. R. Peter Hobson (2012). Emotion as Personal Relatedness. Emotion Review 4 (2):169-175.
    In this article, I consider the structure of interpersonal emotional relations. I argue that current cognitive-developmental theory has overestimated the role of conceptual thinking, and underestimated the role of intrinsic social-emotional organization, in the early development of such feelings as jealousy, shame, and concern. I suggest that human forms of social experience are shaped by a process through which one individual identifies with the bodily expressed attitudes of other people, and stress the diversity of self–other relational states. I draw on (...)
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  4. R. Peter Hobson (2009). Emotion, Self/Other-Awareness, and Autism: A Developmental Perspective. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oup Oxford.
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  5. R. Peter Hobson (2008). Interpersonally Situated Cognition. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):377 – 397.
    In this paper I consider how thinking emerges out of human infants' relatedness towards the personal and non-personal world. I highlight the contrast between cognitive aspects and cognitive components of psychological functioning, and propose that even when thinking has become a partly separable component of the mind, affective and conative aspects inhere in its nature. I provide illustrative evidence from recent research on the developmental psychopathology of autism. In failing to adopt a developmental perspective, contemporary theorizing has displaced thinking from (...)
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  6. R. Peter Hobson (2007). We Share, Therefore We Think. In. In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press. 41--61.
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  7. R. Peter Hobson (2006). Developing Self/Other Awareness: A Reply. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development 71 (2):180-186.
     
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  8. R. Peter Hobson (2005). The Interpersonal Foundations of Thinking. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):703-704.
    Tomasello et al. provide a convincing account of the origins of cultural cognition. I highlight how emotionally grounded sharing of experiences (not merely or predominantly intentions) is critical for the development of interpersonal understanding and perspective-sensitive thinking. Such sharing is specifically human in quality as well as motivation, and entails forms of self–other connectedness and differentiation that are essential to communication and symbolic functioning.
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  9. R. Peter Hobson (2005). What Puts the Jointness Into Joint Attention? In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 185.
    This chapter argues that joint attention needs to be understood in terms of one person's engagement with another person's engagement with the world. It is pivotal from a developmental perspective that we have an appropriate view of what is involved when we share experiences, or when we perceive and align with another person's ‘attention’ as a bodily-expressed and affectively toned relation with the environment. The chapter explores these theoretical issues through studies involving children with autism, who have limited ability to (...)
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  10. R. Peter Hobson (2004). Understanding Self and Other. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):109-110.
    Interpersonal understanding is rooted in social engagement. The question is: How? What features of intersubjective coordination are essential for the growth of concepts about the mind, and how does development proceed on this basis? Carpendale & Lewis (C&L) offer many telling insights, but their account begs questions about the earliest forms of self-other linkage and differentiation, especially as mediated by processes of identification.
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  11. Jessica A. Meyer & R. Peter Hobson (2004). Orientation in Relation to Self and Other: The Case of Autism. Interaction Studies 5 (2):221-244.
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  12. R. Peter Hobson (1996). Understanding Minds and Selves. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):132.
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  13. R. Peter Hobson (1993). On Acquiring the Concept of “Persons”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):525.
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  14. R. Peter Hobson (1993). The Emotional Origins of Social Understanding. Philosophical Psychology 6 (3):227 – 249.
    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the origins of social understanding. Drawing upon philosophical writings, I highlight those features of affectively patterned interpersonal relations that are especially important for a very young child's growing awareness and knowledge of itself and other people as people with their own minds. If we were without our biologically based capacities for co-ordinated emotional relatedness with others, we should lack something essential for acquiring the concept of 'persons' who have subjective experiences and (...)
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