47 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Ruth Weintraub [45]R. Weintraub [2]
See also:
Profile: Ruth Weintraub (Tel Aviv University)
  1. Ruth Weintraub (2013). A New Humean Criticism of Our Inductive Practice. The European Legacy 18 (4):420-431.
    Hume?s familiar sceptical argument against induction brands as irrational our practice of generalising from observed regularities because of its reliance on the assumption that nature is uniform, an assumption which is unjustifiable. The argument which I wish to consider focuses instead on the observed regularities that are required if we are legitimately to extrapolate from experience. According to Hume, the paradigm type of inductive reasoning involves a constant conjunction. But in fact we do not encounter such invariable uniformities: our experience (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ruth Weintraub (2013). Induction and Inference to the Best Explanation. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):203-216.
    In this paper I adduce a new argument in support of the claim that IBE is an autonomous (indispensable) form of inference, based on a familiar, yet surprisingly, under-discussed, problem for Hume’s theory of induction. I then use some insights thereby gleaned to argue for the (reductionist) claim that induction is really IBE, and draw some normative conclusions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ruth Weintraub (2012). What Can We Learn From Buridan's Ass? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):281-301.
    The mythical1 hungry ass, facing two identical bundles of hay equidistant from him, has engendered two related questions. Can he choose one of the bundles, there seemingly being nothing to incline him one way or the other? If he can, the second puzzle — pertaining to rational choice — arises. It seems the ass cannot rationally choose one of the bundles, because there is no sufficient reason for any choice.2In what follows, I will argue that choice is possible even when (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ruth Weintraub (2011). A Solution to the Discursive Dilemma. Philosophical Studies 152 (2):181 - 188.
    An impossibility result pertaining to the aggregation of individual judgements is thought by many to have significant implications for political theory, social epistemology and metaphysics. When members of a group hold a rational set of judgments on some interconnected questions, the theorem shows, it isn't always (logically) possible for them to aggregate their judgements into a collective one in conformity with seemingly very plausible constraints. I reject one of the constraints which engender the dilemma. The analogy with the lottery paradox, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ruth Weintraub (2011). Humean Bodies. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (4):373.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ruth Weintraub (2011). Logic For Expressivists. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (4):601 - 616.
    In this paper I offer solutions to two problems which our moral practice engenders for expressivism, the meta-ethical doctrine according to which ethical statements aren't propositional, susceptible of truth and falsity, but, rather, express the speaker's non-cognitive attitudes. First, the expressivist must show that arguments which are valid when interpreted propositionally are valid when construed expressivistically, and vice versa. The second difficulty is the Frege-Geach problem. Moral arguments employ atomic sentences, negations, disjunctions, etc., and, by expressivist lights, the meaning of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ruth Weintraub (2010). A Problem for Hume's Theory of Induction. Hume Studies 34 (2):169-187.
    According to Hume, the paradigm type of inductive reasoning, or—to use his terminology (T 1.3.6.2; SBN 86)1—"the inference we draw from cause to effect" (or vice versa), involves a constant conjunction. "We remember to have had frequent instances of the existence of one species of objects; and also remember, that the individuals of another species of objects have always attended them. . . . Thus we remember to have seen that species of object we call flame, and to have felt (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ruth Weintraub (2009). A Solution to the Cable Guy Paradox. Erkenntnis 71 (3):355 - 359.
    The Cable Guy will definitely come between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., and I can bet on one of two possibilities: that he will arrive between 8 and 12, or between 12 and 4. Since I have no more information, it seems (eminently) plausible to suppose the two bets are equally attractive. Yet Hajek has presented a tantalising argument that purports to show that the later interval is, initial appearances to the contrary, more choice worthy. In this paper, I rebut (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ruth Weintraub (2009). The Doomsday Argument Revisited (a Stop in the Shooting-Room Included). Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):109-122.
    Leslie’s doomsday argument purports to show that the likelihood of the human race perishing soon is greater than we think. The probability we attach to it, based on our estimate of the chance of various calamities which might bring extinction about (a nuclear holocaust, an ecological disaster, etc.), should be adjusted as follows. If the human race were to survive for a long time, we, livingnow, would be atypical. So our living now increases the probability that the human race will (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ruth Weintraub (2008). A Problem for Hume's Theory of Induction. Hume Studies 34 (2):169-187.
    According to Hume, the paradigm type of inductive reasoning involves a constant conjunction. But, as Price points out, Hume misrepresents ordinary induction: we experience very few constant conjunctions. In this paper, I examine several ways of defending Hume’s (psychological) account of our practice against Price’s objection, and conclude that the theory cannot be upheld.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ruth Weintraub (2008). How Probable is an Infinite Sequence of Heads? A Reply to Williamson. Analysis 68 (299):247–250.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ruth Weintraub (2008). Skepticism About Induction. In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism. Oxford University Press. 129.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ruth Weintraub (2007). Desire as Belief, Lewis Notwithstanding. Analysis 67 (294):116–122.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ruth Weintraub (2007). Locke Vs. Hume: Who is the Better Concept-Empiricist? Dialogue 46 (3):481-500.
    According to the received view, Hume is a much more rigorous and consistent concept-empiricist than Locke. Hume is supposed to have taken as a starting point Locke’s meaning-empiricism, and worked out its full radical implicalions. Locke, by way of contrast, cowered from drawing his theory’s strange consequences. The received view about Locke’s and Hume’s concept-empiricism is mistaken, I shall argue. Hume may be more uncompromising (although he too falters), but he is not more rigorous than Locke. It is not because (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ruth Weintraub (2007). Separability and Concept-Empiricism: Hume Vs. Locke. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (4):729 – 743.
  16. Ruth Weintraub (2006). What Descartes' Demon Can Do and His Dream Cannot. Theoria 72 (4):319-335.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ruth Weintraub (2005). A Humean Conundrum. Hume Studies 31 (2):211-224.
    Hume’s Copy Principle, which accords precedence to impressions over ideas, is restricted to simple perceptions. Yet in all the conceptual analyses Hume conducts by attempting to fit an impression to a (putative) idea, he never checks for simplicity. And this seems to vitiate the analyses: we cannot conclude from the lack of a preceding impression that a putative idea is bogus, unless it is simple. In this paper I criticise several attempts to account for Hume’s seemingly cavalier attitude, and offer (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. R. Weintraub (2004). On Sharp Boundaries for Vague Terms. Synthese 138 (2):233 - 245.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ruth Weintraub (2004). Sleeping Beauty: A Simple Solution. Analysis 64 (1):8–10.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ruth Weintraub (2003). A Non-Fideistic Reading of William James's "The Will to Believe". History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):103 - 121.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ruth Weintraub (2003). The Naturalistic Response to Scepticism. Philosophy 78 (3):369-386.
    Hume is sometimes thought to provide a ‘naturalistic’ response to the sceptic. I consider two ways in which this response may be construed. According to the first, the fact that we are psychologically determined to hold a belief provides it with justification. According to the second, ‘natural’ beliefs provide limits within which reason can legitimately be employed, limits which the sceptic transgresses when he attempts to defend his position. Both versions of the naturalistic response to scepticism, I will argue, aren't (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ruth Weintraub (2003). The Time of a Killing. Analysis 63 (3):178–182.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ruth Weintraub (2003). Verificationism Revisited. Ratio 16 (1):83–98.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ruth Weintraub (2002). Hume's Associations. Hume Studies 28 (2):231-246.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. R. Weintraub (2001). The Lottery: A Paradox Regained and Resolved. Synthese 129 (3):439 - 449.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ruth Weintraub (2001). A Bayesian Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):51-66.
    A seemingly plausible application of Bayesian decision-theoretic reasoning to determine one's rational degrees of belief yields a paradoxical conclusion: one ought to jettison one's intermediate credences in favour of more extreme (opinionated) ones. I discuss various attempts to solve the paradox, those involving the acceptance of the paradoxical conclusion, and those which attempt to block its derivation.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ruth Weintraub (2001). Logical Knowledge. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (1):3 – 18.
    It seems obvious that our beliefs are logically imperfect in two ways: they are neither deductively closed nor logically consistent. But this common-sense truism has been judged erroneous by some philosophers in the light of various arguments. In defence of common sense I consider and rebut interpretative arguments for logical perfection and show that the assumption espoused by common sense is theoretically superior, and capable - unlike its rival - of accounting for the informativeness of mathematics. Finally, I suggest that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ruth Weintraub (1999). Naturalism, Explanation, and Akrasia. Dialogue 38 (01):63-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ruth Weintraub (1999). The Spatiality of the Mental and the Mind-Body Problem. Synthese 117 (3):409-17.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ruth Weintraub (1998). Do Utility Comparisons Pose a Problem? Philosophical Studies 92 (3):307-319.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ruth Weintraub (1997). The Cartesian Circle and Two Forms of Scepticism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (4):365 - 377.
    Descartes’ circle has been extensively discussed, and I do not wish to add another paper to that literature. Rather, I use the circle to facilitate our understanding of two types of scepticism and the proper attitude to them. Descartes’ text is especially apt for this purpose, because a case can be made for attributing to him both types. Although I will touch on the interpretative question, that is not my main aim. My contention is that one brand - whether or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ruth Weintraub (1997). The Sceptical Challenge. Routledge.
    Skepticism gives a pessimistic reply to questions on whether we really know the things we think we know, and whether our beliefs are reasonable. The theoretical and practical difficulties presented by the skeptical challenge--in that the skeptical life cannot be lived, and the doctrine seems self-defeating--are in fact superficial, according to Ruth Weintraub. Her study looks at several famous skeptical arguments of Descartes, Hume, and the ancient Greek skeptic, Sextus Empiricus. She argues that by drawing on philosophy, rather than science, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ruth Weintraub (1996). The Credibility of Miracles. Philosophical Studies 82 (3):359 - 375.
    Hume’s famous argument against the credibility of testimony about miracles invokes two premises: 1) The reliability of the witness (the extent to which he is informed and truthful) must be compared with the intrinsic probability of the miracle. 2) The initial probability of a miracle is always small enough to outweigh the improbability that the testimony is false (even when the witness is assumed to be reliable). I defend the first premise of the argument, showing that Hume’s argument can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ruth Weintraub (1996). The Impossibility of Interpersonal Utility Comparisons: A Critical Note. Mind 105 (420):661-665.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ruth Weintraub (1996). The Sceptical Life. Dialectica 50 (3):225-234.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ruth Weintraub (1995). Practical Solutions to the Surprise-Examination Paradox. Ratio 8 (2):161-169.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ruth Weintraub (1995). Psychological Determinism and Rationality. Erkenntnis 43 (1):67-79.
    There are arguments which purport to rebut psychological determinism by appealing to its alleged incompatibility with rationality. I argue that they all fail. Against Davidson, I argue that rationality does not preclude the existence of psychological laws. Against Popper, I argue that rationality is compatible with the possibility of predicting human actions. Against Schlesinger, I claim that Newcomb's problem cannot be invoked to show that human actions are unpredictable. Having vindicated the possibility of a rationally-based theory of action, I consider (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ruth Weintraub (1995). What Was Hume's Contribution to the Problem of Induction? Philosophical Quarterly 45 (181):460-470.
  39. Joseph Agassi, Dorit Bar-on, D. S. Clarke, Paul Sheldon Davies, Anthony J. Graybosch, Lila Luce, Paul K. Moser, Saul Smilansky, Roger Smook, William Sweet, John J. Tilley & Ruth Weintraub (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1-4):359-362.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ruth Weintraub (1994). The Basis of Justification. Philosophical Papers 23 (1):19-29.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Ruth Weintraub (1993). Fallibilism and Rational Belief. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (2):251-261.
    Fallibilism is an attractive epistemological position, avoiding the Scylla of rationalism, and the Charybdis of scepticism. Acknowledging, on the one hand, human imperfection, yet claiming that science and rational inquiry are possible. Fallibilism is a thesis, but equally importantly – an epistemological recommendation. that we should never be absolutely sure of anything. My aim in this paper is to drive a wedge between the thesis and the recommendation. The (eminently plausible) doctrine, I shall argue, cannot be used to ground the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. R. S. Woolhouse, George N. Schlesinger, Lawrence Udell Fike, Lila Luce, Giora Hon, Ruth Weintraub & Mark Rowlands (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 22 (3-4):293-296.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Ruth Weintraub (1991). Epistemology Without Knowledge? Ratio 4 (2):157-169.
    Epistemologists have traditionally been concerned with two issues: the justification of particular beliefs or sets of beliefs, and claims to knowledge. I propose to examine the relative import of these questions by comparing the gravity of the threat posed by two sceptics: one who questions the justifiability of our beliefs, and one who doubts our knowledge claims.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Ruth Weintraub (1990). Decision-Theoretic Epistemology. Synthese 83 (1):159 - 177.
    In this paper, I examine the possibility of accounting for the rationality of belief-formation by utilising decision-theoretic considerations. I consider the utilities to be used by such an approach, propose to employ verisimilitude as a measure of cognitive utility, and suggest a natural way of generalising any measure of verisimilitude defined on propositions to partial belief-systems, a generalisation which may enable us to incorporate Popper's insightful notion of verisimilitude within a Bayesian framework. I examine a dilemma generated by the decision-theoretic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ruth Weintraub (1990). Objectivism Without Objective Probabilities. Theoria 56 (1-2):23-41.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ruth Weintraub (1988). A Paradox of Confirmation. Erkenntnis 29 (2):169 - 180.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ruth Weintraub (1987). Unconscious Mental States. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (October):423-32.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation