Search results for 'R. Z. D' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Brian R. Clack, A. B. P. & R. C. B. (1996). Robert Audi, Ed. The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Pp. Xxviii+882. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.) £55.00 Hbk, £17.95 Pbk.Stephen R.L. Clark. How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Pp. Vii+223. (London: Routledge, 1995.) £40.00.D. Z. Phillips. Introducing Philosophy. Pp. Xii+206. (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.) £40.00 Hbk, £11.99 Pbk.Paul Ricoeur. Figuring the Sacred: Religion, Narrative and Imagination. Pp. Viii+340. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995.)Frederick Sontag. Wittgenstein and the Mystical: Philosophy as an Ascetic Practice. Pp. Xii+167. (Atlanta, Georgia: Scholars Press, 1995.) $34.95 Hbk, $22.95 Pbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 32 (4):529-531.score: 252.0
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  2. Brian Clack, A. B. P. & C. B. (1996). Dan Cohn-Sherbok. Judaism and Other Faiths. Pp. 186. (Basingstoke & London, Macmillan: 1994.) £40.00.Dan Cohn-Sherbok & Christopher Lewis (Ed.). Beyond Death: Theological and Philosophical Reflections on Life After Death. (Basingstoke & London, Macmillan: 1995.) Pp. Xii + 219. £40.00 Hbk, £14.99 Pbk.Roy D. Morrison, II. Science, Theology and the Transcendental Horizon: Einstein, Kant and Tillich. (Atlanta, Scholars Press: 1994.) Pp. Xxiii + 460. $59·95 Hbk, $39·95 Pbk.Dewi Z. Phillips, J. R. Jones. (Cardiff, University of Wales Press: 1995.) Pp. 122. £4·95 Pbk.Jean Porter. Moral Action and Christian Ethics. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.) Pp. 254. £35·00.Frank E. Reynolds & David Tracy (Eds). Religion and Practical Reason: New Essays in the Comparative Philosophy of Religions. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994.) Pp. Ix + 444. $21.95.Keith E. Yandell. The Epistemology of Religious Experience. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.) Pp. Viii + 371. £. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 32 (1):139.score: 243.0
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  3. R. F. Khan (1984). D. Z. Phillips on Waiters and Bad Faith. Philosophy 59 (229):389 - 391.score: 153.0
    Professor D. Z. Phillips in (Philosophy56, 1981) assigns to Sartre the view that , i.e. the profession of waiting as such is in bad faith. What could (...)
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  4. R. F. Holland (1998). Rush Rhees on Religion and Philosophy D. Z. Phillips (Ed.) Cambridge University Press, 1997, Pp. XII + 389, £50 (US $69.95) Hb. [REVIEW] Philosophy 73 (3):495-523.score: 117.0
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  5. O. R. Jones (1967). The Concept of Prayer. By D. Z. Phillips. (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1965. Pp. 167. Price 25s.). Philosophy 42 (159):96-.score: 117.0
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  6. E. Z. Nemesszeghy & E. A. Nemesszeghy (1973). On the Creative Role of the Definition (PQ) = (∼PQ) D F in the System of Principia: Reply to V. H. Dudman (I) and R. Black (II). [REVIEW] Mind 82 (328):613-616.score: 117.0
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  7. R. F. Atkinson (1971). Moral Practices, By D. Z. Phillips and H. O. Mounce. (Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1969. Pp. Viii + 135. Price £1.60.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 46 (176):179-.score: 117.0
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  8. Ari Z. Bryen (2013). D. Liebs Summoned to the Roman Courts. Famous Trials From Antiquity. Translated by Rebecca L.R. Garber and Carole Gustely Cürten. Pp. Viii + 274. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 2012. Cased, £41.95, US$60. ISBN: 978-0-520-25962-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):534-536.score: 117.0
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  9. R. M. Cook (1973). A. D. Trendall: Greek Vases in the Logie Collection. Pp. 83; 40 Plates. Christchurch, N.Z.: University Canterbury, 1971. Stiff Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 23 (02):290-.score: 117.0
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  10. J. R. S. Fincham (1986). Genetics, From A to Z. A Dictionary of Genetics. By Robert C. King and William D. Stansfield. O.U.P., 1985 (3rd Ed.). Pp. 480. £25. [REVIEW] Bioessays 4 (2):91-91.score: 117.0
  11. R. J. (1994). [Z Nowości Zagranicznych] Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Matematyce J.M. Folina, Poincaré and the Philosophy of Mathematics, 1992. K. Jacobs, Invitation to Mathematics, 1992. D. M. Davis, The Nature and Power of Mathematics, 1993. G. Hellman, Mathemati. [REVIEW] Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 16.score: 117.0
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  12. V. Z. Belenky & A. M. Belostotsky (1989). Resource Allocation and Project Selection: Control of R & D Under Dynamic Process of Data Improvement. Theory and Decision 26 (1):1-35.score: 117.0
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  13. Brian R. Clack (1995). D. Z. Phillips, Wittgenstein and Religion. Religious Studies 31 (1):111.score: 117.0
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  14. D. Z. Philips (ed.) (2008). Studies in the Ethics and Philosophy of Religion (Pod). Routledge.score: 117.0
    Routledge is proud to reissue these nine pivotal titles from the acclaimed series Studies in Ethics and the Philosophy of Religion. Including key works by Ahern, Beardsmore, (...)
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  15. Peter Singer, D E B at E.score: 108.0
    An d rew Ku per begins his cri ti que of my vi ews on poverty by accepti n g the crux of my moral argument: The (...)
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  16. H. P. A. Boshuizen, H. C. Boxsahin, D. Chapman, Z. Dienes, N. V. Findler, J. C. Glasgow, V. Goel, R. M. Pilkington, Rumelhart de & H. G. Schmidt (1992). Ahn, W., 81 Martin, JH. 233 Alterman, R., 205 Medin, DL, 81 Bookman, LA, 205 Bordage, Cl., 185. Cognitive Science 16:583.score: 108.0
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  17. Berit Soli-Holt & Isaac Linder (2013). The Call of The Wild: Terro(I)R Modulations. Continent 3 (2):60-65.score: 108.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift (...) stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the drifiting thought that attention be paid to the contributions as they entered into conversation one after another. This particular piece is from the BETWEEN SPACE & PLACE thread: April Vannini, Those Between the Common * Laura Dean & Jesse McClelland, Ballard: A Portrait of Placemaking * Amara Hark Weber, Crossroad * Isaac Linder & Berit Soli-Holt, The Call of the Wild: Terro(i)r Modulations * Ashley D. Hairston, Momma taught us to keep a clean house * Sean Smith, The Garage (Take One) * * * * Instead of beginning with radical doubt, we start from naiveté. —Graham Harman, The Quadruple Object Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, the call sounding imperiously, deep in the forest. —Jack London, The Call of the Wild The figure of the feral remains a perpetual enigma, but the parameters remain relatively consistent. A person, usually a child, enters civilization after having been raised by wolves or kept in some kind of cruel captivity. The outsider perspective on domestication ensuing in an edge of a culture's self-recognition of its clumsier attributes, what has been taken for granted becomes apparent, is brought to the foreground with the stranger and made questionable. Amusement follows naïve questions or observations such as Kaspar Hauser in the Herzog film, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, when Kaspar notes that while in his room he is engulfed by it, but when he looks at the tower (with the room inside) he can turn away and it disappears. Ergo, the room is larger than the tower. How entertaining. The aberrant one destabilizes the comforting cultural normative. Places become seen as mere impressions out of space, a patterning, a rut that not everyone lives in like us. This is one figure of the feral. The naiveté that begs all the questions. As a figure for a certain philosophical disposition, the rapidity of ones saccade scans the environment, intuits its space, not from an initial thaumazein or a Critchlean sense of disappointment, but from a child-like naiveté bent on survival (itself other than the Socratic naiveté Nietzsche speaks of). To serve the naïve is merely one form of critique, and it is not nearly used enough in lieu of the critique that provides answers. How dull. It is not necessary to be an outsider to entrench a critique with naiveté. After having forced to suffer in the most parched and rocky terro(i)r, itself for so long rooted upwards of fifty feet into the ground upon which it grows, even a grapevine can spontaneously produce a white grape on a red vine. The curious feral can arise from within, and like pinot grigio, it adds variety without admonishing its roots. There is also the feral dog. Not raised by wolves, but humans. Founded in place the figure of this feral denies this place. The trajectory of this feral roves from the cultivated to uncultivated, or in speaking of plants from controlled to volunteer, finding the necessary nutrients and survival patterns on its own. Finding other places, reaching out into space testing its fertility. And when introduced into a foreign environment, it withers or flourishes. We would like to attempt a thesis at this juncture and to accept neither feral figure in its entirety, but to argue for the intimate conjunction between a cultivated place and its resonance with the space it procures for its nest and kin. I'm not a biter, I'm a writer for myself and others. —Jay-Z, What More Can I Say? I am writing for myself and strangers. This is the only way that I can do it. Everybody is a real one to me, everybody is like some one else too to me. No one of them that I know can want to know it and so I write for myself and strangers. —Gertrude Stein, The Making of Americans There is no subjective disposition outlining an unambiguous individual of the para-academy. There is no para-academic. We all have day jobs. 'Para-academic' seeped through the cracks as an adjective in the call to frame publishing dedicated to the critical rigor expected by academic publishing, but to deny the limitations of guarded legitimation through capital means. Open-access holds hands with this parasitic descriptor. Para-academic publishing's refusal to adhere to the valuation of locked access of a site, the siteof a desperate initiation to the empty form of value,” 1 seeks to recognize not merely an inclusive interpretation of significance, but the significance of thinking practice. The practice inside the paywalls of academic 'education' is held in a deathgrip by its infatuation with value and information, both empty without the apprehension of human experience, the barbaric yawp. “I can't breathe in here.” It is not that a para-academic practice leads one to the childish wonder of Kaspar Hauser who wonders about the spatiality of his room. It is the academic legitimation that distorts that one can hold the understanding of both in a constellation of place and space. Led to believe there is only a place for things, we are led to disillusionment. It is also not that a para-academic practice relinquishes itself to the invasive growth outside of careful cultivation, an abandonment of pleasantries for the toothy growl of a predator. It is the academy's fear that thought does not require capital to signify value. Some of the most nutritious meals can be foraged. Defining a para-academic practice is not outlining a place of accreditation of the practice, it is the recognition that any place is subject to modulation by the space it inhabits as well as creates. The para-academic practice keeps an eye of the creation of spaces, follows those paths that eat themselves in the name of academia. This is not unlike Red Peter's report to the academy, only successful if we report in idle idiosyncratic banalities that we have once again become victorious in our acculturation and nullification within the confines of accredited mush and our trajectory of wild rigor is defeated in our desire for recognition as recognizable in this place. Weeds are integral to the functioning of a large ecosystem. The manicured garden is entirely reliant on its keeper. The pansy can also go wild once neglected, the daisy definitely does. . . . a universe comes into being when a space is severed or taken apart. The skin of a living organism cuts off an outside from an inside. So does the circumference of a circle in a plane. By tracing the way we represent such a severance, we can begin to reconstruct, with an accuracy and coverage that appear almost uncanny, the basic forms underlying linguistic, mathematical, physical, and biological science, and can begin to see how the familiar laws of our own experience follow from the original act of severance. The act is itself already remembered, even if unconsciously, as our first attempt to distinguish different things in a world where, in the first place, the boundaries can be drawn anywhere we please. At this stage the universe cannot be distinguished from how we act upon it, and the world may seem like shifting sand beneath our feet. —George Spencer-Brown, Laws of Form Two edges are created: an obedient, conformist, plagiarizing edge (the language is to be copied in its canonical state, as it has been established by schooling, good usage, literature, culture), and another edge, mobile, blank (ready to assume any contours), which is never anything but the site of its effect: the place where the death of language is glimpsed. These two edges, the compromise they bring about, are necessary. —Roland Barthes, The Pleasure of the Text Between these two epigraphs, interminable questions of where and questions of happening, gesture, and interface. To stay buoyed between a site of visible (read: valued) happening and haptic perspicacity. Bounded by one or the other leads to a desiccation of potential knowledge. The tumbleweed tumbles until met with mud, a bare structure moving but not movement. A tumbleweed tumbleweeds, propagates only at a place. It becomes significant again, continues. Significance, the site where meaning is made known through kinesthetic apprehension. 2 The feral founds (as those feral twins Romulus and Remus found) a gestural horizon; an outsiders scrawl-becoming-law; Deleuze teaching Menos dog geometry. Place as marked, outlined, recognized, territorialized. The academies marked by their peculiar disciplines, outlined by their rigid boundaries, recognized as factories of value. This far from ensures complete purchase on the space of thought, but it has made an undeniably elaborate means of making work significant. The academy is a muddy spot, it is fertile, but its gates are high and its dogs are barking. The coordinates of concept and experience. Already claimed by a stabilizing suspension, the terms enter specificity ofthis is this’. Another correlation: activity and the individual. The individual, a placeholder in the crosshairs of juridical identification. Activity, what expands and surrounds this location, but utterly indebted to the node ofone who”. What's happening in this oscillation of nature and nurture is practice. Practice, as Stengers tells usis not the activity of an individual or the product of that activity. It is the ingredient without which neither that activity nor this product would exist as such.” 3 Moving outward from our own honing, we're curious about the ingredient creating the place for holding conceptual and experiential engagements in each hand. And we'd like to argue that this place is not a limiting specification, but a practice undulating daily, by the minute. And we call this practice the para-academic practice. I repeat: there was no attraction for me in imitating human beings; I imitated them because I needed a way out, and for no other reason. —Franz Kafka, A Report to an Academy In order to exist, man must rebel, but rebellion must respect the limit it discovers in itselfa limit where minds meet and, in meeting, begin to exist. —Albert Camus, The Rebel Anyone is a para-academic or practicer of such means. The academic can, and we argue should, be active para-academically, to escape the bounds, recognizing no site specific place as a place to rest on or the place to grab the Kafka's top and wonder at its disobedience not to continue. Yet, the para-academic practice must maintain the desire for rigor in scholarship. Indeed desiring past itself to claim a more naïve rigor, one that does not take its form for granted. Without a para-academic practice, the scholar spends half the time merely working on behalf of a hierarchy, to maintain it, and the other measly amounts of time are in the name of thinking, but only in name. Not to mention the amount of debt it takes to attend the halls of higher education. Not to mention the snoring tenures. Not to mention the barely scraping by adjuncts. Not to mention the materials that shake the very force of producible theory. Not to mention when swimming in texts becomes slogging through data. Academia is a barbaric food chain and it is our claim that there is, as always, an imperative for thought to move, with Heidegger, beyond the logics of calculation and planning, to a time (and so a space) of its own. The path, into the panic of the dark wood of this space can be followed by any; any who let the silence and the rigor enter the play. Where the little theater is larger when inhabited (Hausers perspective); where the data of the tutor asymptotically refutes; and where, as much as one wouldnt expect it here, ballet may turn out to be the most feral of formsNOTES Jean Baudrillard, “Value's Last TangoSimulacra and Simulation trans. Sheila Faria Glaser, (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 1994). “What is significance? It is meaning, insofar as it is sensually produced.” Roland Barthes in The Pleasure of the Text . Isabelle Stengers, “The Science WarsCosmopolitics I trans. Robert Bononno (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010), 47. (shrink)
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  18. John R. Shook & Richard T. Hull (eds.) (2005). The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers. Thoemmes Continuum.score: 96.0
    v. 1. A-C -- v. 2. D-J -- v. 3. K-Q -- v. 4. R-Z.
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  19. Steven E. Boër (2003). Thought-Contents and the Formal Ontology of Sense. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (1):43-114.score: 87.0
    This paper articulates a formal theory of belief incorporating three key theses: (1) belief is a dyadic relation between an agent and a property; (2) this property (...)
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  20. Angelina Ilić Stepić & Zoran Ognjanović (forthcoming). Logics for Reasoning About Processes of Thinking with Information Coded by P-Adic Numbers. Studia Logica:1-30.score: 87.0
    In this paper we present two types of logics (denoted \({L^{D}_{Q_{p}}}\) and \({L^{\rm thinking}_{Z_{p}}}\) ) where certain p-adic functions are associated to (...) propositional formulas. Logics of the former type are p-adic valued probability logics. In each of these logics we use probability formulas K r,ρ α and D ρ α,β which enable us to make sentences of the formthe probability of α belongs to the p-adic ball with the center r and the radius ρ”, andthe p-adic distance between the probabilities of α and β is less than or equal to ρ”, respectively. Logics of the later type formalize processes of thinking where information are coded by p-adic numbers. We use the same operators as above, but in this formalism K r,ρ α meansthe p-adic code of the information α belongs to the p-adic ball with the center r and the radius ρ”, while D ρ α,β meansthe p-adic distance between codes of α and β are less than or equal to ρ”. The corresponding strongly complete axiom systems are presented and decidability of the satisfiability problem for each logic is proved. (shrink)
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  21. R. Z. D. (1973). The Problem of Evolution. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):379-380.score: 87.0
  22. P. H. Gompertz, P. Irwin, R. Morris, D. Lowe MSc Cstat, Z. Rutledge, A. G. Rudd & M. G. Pearson (2001). Reliability and Validity of the Intercollegiate Stroke Audit Package. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (1):1-11.score: 87.0
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  23. Pedro Mercado Pacheco (2012). Experimentalismo democrático, nuevas formas de regulación Y legitimación Del derecho. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 46:37-68.score: 87.0
    E n e l a r tícul o s e aborda n lo s pro b lema s d e l e gitimació n qu e plantea (...)
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  24. Francesco Armetta (ed.) (2010). Dizionario Enciclopedico Dei Pensatori E Dei Teologi di Sicilia, Secc. Xix E Xx. Salvatore Sciascia.score: 87.0
    v. 1. A-B -- v. 2. C -- v. 3. D-F --- v. 4. G-L -- v. 5. M-Q -- v. 6. R-Z.
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  25. A. C. Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.) (2006). The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum.score: 87.0
    v. 1. A-C -- v. 2. D-J -- v. 3. K-Q -- v. 4. R-Z.
     
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  26. J. R. Jones & D. Z. Phillips (1970). Belief and Loss of Belief: A Discussion. Sophia 9 (1):1-7.score: 87.0
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  27. D. Z. Milikovsky, R. Ben Yona, D. Akselrod, S. M. Glick & A. Jotkowitz (2013). Willingness to Treat Infectious Diseases: What Do Students Think? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (1):22-26.score: 87.0
    Introduction Outbreaks of serious communicable infectious diseases remain a major global medical problem and force healthcare workers to make hard choices with limited information, resources and time. (...)
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  28. Alfredo Ferrarin (1994). Husserl on the Ego and its Eidos (. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):645-659.score: 81.0
    Husserl on the Ego and its Eidos (Cartesian Meditations, IV) ALFREDO FERRARIN THE THEORY OF the intentionality of consciousness is essential for Husserl's philosophy, and in (...)particular for his mature theory of the ego. But it runs into serious difficulties when it has to account for consciousness's transcendental constitution of its own reflective experience and its relation to immanent time. This intricate knot, the inseparability of time and constitution, is most visibly displayed in Husserl's writings from the 192os up to the notion of the eidos ego in the fourth Cartesian Meditation. In this paper I want to dwell on the most problematic aspects of this theory. After a few preliminary remarks about the intentionality of consciousness (sec- tion 1), I try to place the theory of the substrate of habitualities in the context of Husserl's evolution on the issue of the reflection of the ego on itself (section ~). I briefly follow the threads of Husserl's shifting position from the Logical Investi- gat/ons and Ideas I to Ideas II, the Cartesian Meditations and the Cr/s/s. I indicate Husserl's works are quoted with the following abbreviations: CM = Cartesiani.~he Meditationen, Husserliana Bd. I, hrsg. v. S. Strasser (Den Haag, 195o); Carte- s/an M~, trans. D. Cairns (Dordrecht, 196o ) SW = Husserl, Shorter Works, ed. P. McCormick and F. Elliston (Notre Dame, 198a) IZ = Zur Phttnomenologie des inneren Zeilheun~tseim (z 893-z 917), Husserliana Bd. X, hrsg. v. R. Boehm (Den Haag, 1966 ) Ideen I = ldeen zu einer reinen Ph~nomenologie und ph~nomenologischen Philosophic, Husserliana Bd. III, hrsg. v. W. Biemel (Den Haag, t95o); Ideas I, trans. F. Kersten (The Hague, Boston, Lancaster, s983) ldeen// = ld., Hussefliana Bd. IV, hrsg. v. M. Biemel (Den Haag, 1952); Ideas I1, trans. R. Rojcewicz and A. Schuwer (Dordrecht, Boston, London, x 989) FTL = Forma/e und transzendenta~ Log/k, Husserliana Bd. XVII, hrsg. v. P. Janssen (Den Haag, t974) Kr/sh = Kr/s/s der europ~/schen W/ssen~haften, Husserliana Bd. VI, hrsg. v. W. Biemel (Den Haag, 1954) I wish to express my gratitude to Pierre Kerszberg and Alessandra Fussi for their helpful com- ments on an earlier draft of the paper, and to Graham Harman for checking the final version of my English text. [645] 646 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 32:4 OCTOBER 1994 some historical antecedents, in particular Aristotle, of Husserl's theory of abid- ing properties which, as far as I can see, have not been pointed out before. Husserl's Entwicklungsgeschichte on the topic of the pure ego has already been the object of important scholarly works, of which Kern's 1964 Husserl und Kant seems to me the best example. But what the secondary literature does not do is develop thematically the ambiguities of Husserl's definitions of consciousness and temporality in a unitary and comprehensive way. While I follow the lead of Berger, Broekman, Kern, Marbach,' and others, I find that their work does not sufficiently stress the difficulties at the core ofintentionality and reflective time- consciousness. Therefore, although section 2 is a necessary presupposition for drawing some critical conclusions in the final two sections, it does not exhaust my theme. After clarifying the peculiarity of the notions of essence, intuition, tran- scendental and apriori, as well as their irl:educibility to a Kantian meaning, I turn to the "de facto transcendental ego" resulting from eidetic variation (section 3) in order to introduce an examination of temporality. The difficul- ties in the twofold requirement, namely, that consciousness be the identical subject of its Erlebnisse and be synthetically unified in time, concern the unity, primacy, and mutual relation of time and consciousness in the constitution of our experience. They have been heady pointed out by Ricoeur in his commen- tary on the Cartesian Meditations. But what I want to argue in section 4, going beyond Ricoeur's text, is that the tension between temporally constituted and constitutive consciousness in the ego's reflection on its own retentions and protensions does not simply make the question of time ambiguous, but has crucial and problematic bearings on the very definition of consciousness as intentionality. In this respect... -/- . (shrink)
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  29. R. Bernabei, P. Belli, F. Cappella, R. Cerulli, C. J. Dai, A. D'Angelo, H. L. He, A. Incicchitti, H. H. Kuang, X. H. Ma, F. Montecchia, F. Nozzoli, D. Prosperi, X. D. Sheng & Z. P. Ye (2010). Results From DAMA/LIBRA at Gran Sasso. Foundations of Physics 40 (7):900-916.score: 81.0
    The DAMA project is an observatory for rare processes and it is operative deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N. In (...)
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  30. Ciprian Dariescu (1996). Planary Symmetric Static Worlds with Massless Scalar Sources. Foundations of Physics 26 (8):1069-1080.score: 81.0
    Motivated by the recent wave of investigations on plane domain wall spacetimes with nontrivial topologies, the present paper deals with (probably) the most simple source field configuration (...)
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  31. Wolfgang Drechsler (1999). Mass Generation by Weyl Symmetry Breaking. Foundations of Physics 29 (9):1327-1369.score: 81.0
    A massless electroweak theory for leptons is formulated in a Weyl space, W4, yielding a Weyl invariant dynamics of a scalar field φ, chiral Dirac fermion fields (...)
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  32. Martin Cohen (2005). Wittgenstein's Beetle and Other Classic Thought Experiments. Blackwell Pub..score: 81.0
    A is for Alice and astronomers arguing about acceleration -- B is for Bernard's body-exchange machine -- C is for the Catholic cannibal -- D is for Maxwell (...)'s demon -- E is for evolution (and an embarrassing problem with it) -- F is for the forms lost forever to the prisoners of the cave -- G is for Galileo's gravitational balls -- H is for Hume's shades -- I is for the identity of indiscernibles -- J is for Henri Poincaré and alternative geometries -- K is for the Kritik and Kant's kind of thought experiments -- L is for Lucretius' spear -- M is for Mach's motionless chain -- N is for Newton's bucket -- O is for Olbers' paradox -- P is for Parfit's person -- Q is for the questions raised by thought experiments quotidiennes -- R is for the rule-ruled room -- S is for Salvatius' ship, sailing along its own space-time line -- T is for the time-travelling twins -- U is for the universe, and Einstein's attempts to understand it -- V is for the vexed case of the violinist -- W is for Wittgenstein's beetle -- X is for xenophanes and thinking by examples -- Y is for counterfactuals and a backwards approach to history -- Z is for Zeno and the mysteries of infinity. (shrink)
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  33. W. Jianping, L. Li, D. Xue, Z. Tang, X. Jia, R. Wu, Y. Xi, T. Wang & P. Zhou (2010). Analysis of the Status of Informed Consent in Medical Research Involving Human Subjects in Public Hospitals in Shanghai. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (7):415-419.score: 81.0
    Objectives The objectives of the study are to understand the current practice of informed consent in medical research in public hospitals in Shanghai, and to share our (...)
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  34. Steven T. Katz (ed.) (1980). Saadiah Gaon. Arno Press.score: 81.0
    Rau, D. Die Ethik R. Saadjas.--Neumark, D. Saadya's philosophy.--<span class='Hi'>Vajdaspan>, G. Saadia Gaon et l'amour courtois.--Diesendruck, Z. Saadya's formulation of the (...)span>, G. Saʻadyā commentateur du "Livre of la création."--<span class='Hi'>Vajdaspan>, G. Études sur Saadia.--Harkavy, A. Fragments of anti-Karaite writings of Saadiah in the Imperial Public Library at St. Petersburg.--Eisler, M. Vorlesungen über die jüdischen Philosophen des Mittelalters. (shrink)
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  35. Robert C. Roberts (1994). Review: The Philosopher as Sage: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 22 (2):407 - 431.score: 81.0
    Recent books by Paul Johnston, D. Z. Phillips, Philip Shields, and B. R. Tilghman all depict Wittgenstein as centrally concerned with ethics, but they range from representing (...)
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  36. R. Bernabei, P. Belli, F. Cappella, R. Cerulli, C. J. Dai, A. D'Angelo, H. L. He, A. Incicchitti, H. H. Kuang, X. H. Ma, F. Montecchia, F. Nozzoli, D. Prosperi, X. D. Sheng & Z. P. Ye (2010). Non-Paulian Nuclear Processes in Highly Radiopure NaI(Tl): Status and Perspectives. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (7):807-813.score: 81.0
    Searches for non-paulian nuclear processes, i.e. processes normally forbidden by the PauliExclusionPrinciple (PEP) with highly radiopure NaI(Tl) scintillators allow the test of this fundamental (...) principle with high sensitivity. Status and perspectives are addressed. (shrink)
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  37. R. D. Pentz, R. D. Harvey, M. White, Z. L. Farmer, O. Dashevskaya, Z. Chen, C. Lewis, T. K. Owonikoko & F. R. Khuri (2011). Research Biopsies in Phase I Studies: Views and Perspectives of Participants and Investigators. Irb 34 (2):1-8.score: 81.0
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  38. Zdravko Radman (ed.) (2012). Knowing Without Thinking: Mind, Action, Cognition and the Phenomenon of the Background. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 81.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction; Z.Radman -- The Mystery of the Background qua Background; H.L.Dreyfus -- PART I: ECHOING SEARLE' (...)S AND DREYFUS' VIEWS ON THE BACKGROUND -- Ground-Level Intelligence:Action-Oriented Representation and the Dynamics of the Background; M.Cappuccio& M.Wheeler -- Exposing the Background: Deep and Local; D.D.Hutto -- The Background as Intentional, Conscious, and Nonconceptual; M.Schmitz -- Social Cognition, the Chinese Room, and the Robot Replies; S.Gallagher -- Contesting John's Searle' Social Ontology: Institutions and Background; J.Margolis -- Music and the Background; D.Schmicking -- PART II: EXTENDED VIEWS ON THE BACKGROUND -- Implicit Precision; E.T.Gendlin -- Enkinaesthesia: The Essential Sensuous Background for Co-Agency; S.A.J.Stuart -- Steps Entailed in Foregrounding the Background: Taking the Challenge of Languaging Experience Seriously; M.Sheets-Johnstone -- The Body as Background: Pragmatism and Somasthetics; R.Shusterman -- The Background: A Tool of Potentiality; Z.Radman -- Embodied Technology as Implicit Knowledge of Modern Civilization; K.Mainzer -- Index. (shrink)
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  39. Bruce I. Rose (1978). Rings Which Admit Elimination of Quantifiers. Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (1):92-112.score: 81.0
    We say that a ring admits elimination of quantifiers, if in the language of rings, {0, 1, +, ·}, the complete theory of R admits elimination of quantifiers. (...)Theorem 1. Let D be a division ring. Then D admits elimination of quantifiers if and only if D is an algebraically closed or finite field. A ring is prime if it satisfies the sentence: ∀ xyz (x = 0y = 0xzy0). Theorem 2. If R is a prime ring with an infinite center and R admits elimination of quantifiers, then R is an algebraically closed field. Let A be the class of finite fields. Let B be the class of 2 × 2 matrix rings over a field with a prime number of elements. Let C be the class of rings of the form $GF(p^n) \bigoplus GF(p^k)$ such that either n = k or g.c.d. (n, k) = 1. Let D be the set of ordered pairs (f, Q) where Q is a finite set of primes and f: QABC such that the characteristic of the ring f(q) is q. Finally, let E be the class of rings of the form $\bigoplus_{q \in Q}f(q)$ for some (f, Q) in D. Theorem 3. Let R be a finite ring without nonzero trivial ideals. Then R admits elimination of quantifiers if and only if R belongs to E. Theorem 4. Let R be a ring with the descending chain condition of left ideals and without nonzero trivial ideals. Then R admits elimination of quantifiers if and only if R is an algebraically closed field or R belongs to E. In contrast to Theorems 2 and 4, we have Theorem 5. If R is an atomless p-ring, then R is finite, commutative, has no nonzero trivial ideals and admits elimination of quantifiers, but is not prime and does not have the descending chain condition. We also generalize Theorems 1, 2 and 4 to alternative rings. (shrink)
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  40. Edward Henderson (1982). A Critique of Religious Reductionism. Philosophy Research Archives 8:429-456.score: 81.0
    Accounts of theistic faith according to which it does not involve referring to or believing in God as existing independently of the life of faith are instances (...)
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  41. D. Z. Phillips & A. R. Manser (1979). Alienation and the Sociologizing of Meaning. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 53:95 - 133.score: 81.0
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  42. P. Zhou, D. Xue, T. Wang, Z. L. Tang, S. K. Zhang, J. P. Wang, P. P. Mao, Y. Q. Xi, R. Wu & R. Shi (2009). Survey on the Function, Structure and Operation of Hospital Ethics Committees in Shanghai. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):512-516.score: 81.0
    Objective: The objectives of this study are to understand the current functions, structure and operation of hospital ethics committees (HECs) in Shanghai and to facilitate their improvement. (...)
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  43. Stanley Cavell, J. Conant, C. Diamond, I. Dilman, P. M. S. Hacker, B. F. McGuinness, A. Palmer, D. Z. Phillips, R. Rhees & J. Schulte (2001). On Wittgenstein. Philosophical Investigations 24 (2):89-184.score: 81.0
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  44. R. S. Downie, Ilham Dilman & D. Z. Phillips (1972). Sense and Delusion. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (87):184.score: 81.0
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  45. El Consejo de Redacción (2012). Nicolás López calera, in memoriam. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 46:261-262.score: 81.0
    Cuand o l a edició n d e est e númer o d e lo s Anale s d e l a Cáted r a F r (...)
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  46. W. Kintsch, P. Boyer, M. Bucciarelli, B. R. Buchsbaum, M. W. Burton, Y. D. Cheng, M. T. H. Chi, T. Clermont, L. Z. Daily & N. Dounskaia (2001). Johnson, PE, 355 Johnson, TR, 903 Johnson-Laird, PN, 565 Kemeny, V., 733. Cognitive Science 25:979-980.score: 81.0
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  47. Pedro Mercado Pacheco (2012). Democracia, participación Y representación: Presentación. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 46:7-10.score: 81.0
    Cuand o l a edició n d e est e númer o d e lo s Anale s d e l a Cáted r a F r (...)
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  48. E. Papastavrou, G. Efstathiou, H. Tsangari, R. Suhonen, H. Leino-Kilpi, E. Patiraki, C. Karlou, Z. Balogh, A. Palese, M. Tomietto, D. Jarosova & A. Merkouris (2012). Patients' and Nurses' Perceptions of Respect and Human Presence Through Caring Behaviours: A Comparative Study. Nursing Ethics 19 (3):369-379.score: 81.0
    Although respect and human presence are frequently reported in nursing literature, these are poorly defined within a nursing context. The aim of this study was to examine (...)
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  49. Matthew W. Parker (2003). Three Concepts of Decidability for General Subsets of Uncountable Spaces. Theoretical Computer Science 351 (1):2-13.score: 81.0
    There is no uniquely standard concept of an effectively decidable set of real numbers or real n-tuples. Here we consider three notions: decidability up to measure (...)zero [M.W. Parker, Undecidability in Rn: Riddled basins, the KAM tori, and the stability of the solar system, Phil. Sci. 70(2) (2003) 359382], which we abbreviate d.m.z.; recursive approximability [or r.a.; K.-I. Ko, Complexity Theory of Real Functions, Birkhäuser, Boston, 1991]; and decidability ignoring boundaries [d.i.b.; W.C. Myrvold, The decision problem for entanglement, in: R.S. Cohen et al. (Eds.), Potentiality, Entanglement, and Passion-at-a-Distance: Quantum Mechanical Studies fo Abner Shimony, Vol. 2, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Great Britain, 1997, pp. 177190]. Unlike some others in the literature, these notions apply not only to certain nice sets, but to general sets in Rn and other appropriate spaces. We consider some motivations for these concepts and the logical relations between them. It has been argued that d.m.z. is especially appropriate for physical applications, and on Rn with the standard measure, it is strictly stronger than r.a. [M.W. Parker, Undecidability in Rn: Riddled basins, the KAM tori, and the stability of the solar system, Phil. Sci. 70(2) (2003) 359382]. Here we show that this is the only implication that holds among our three decidabilities in that setting. Under arbitrary measures, even this implication fails. Yet for intervals of non-zero length, and more generally, convex sets of non-zero measure, the three concepts are equivalent. (shrink)
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  50. R. Rezaie, P. G. Simos, J. M. Fletcher, J. Juranek, P. T. Cirino, Z. Li, A. D. Passaro & A. C. Papanicolaou (2010). The Timing and Strength of Regional Brain Activation Associated with Word Recognition in Children with Reading Difficulties. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:45-45.score: 81.0
    The study investigates the relative degree and timing of cortical activation across parietal, temporal, and frontal regions during performance of a continuous visual word recognition task in (...)
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