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  1. Rachel A. Ankeny (forthcoming). Historiographic Reflections on Model Organisms: Or How the Mureaucracy May Be Limiting Our Understanding of Contemporary Genetics and Genomics. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.
  2. Rachel A. Ankeny (forthcoming). The Overlooked Role of Cases in Casual Attribution in Medicine. .
    Although cases are central to the epistemic practices utilized within clinical medicine, they appear to be limited in their ability to provide evidence about causal relations because they provide detailed accounts of particular patients without explicit filtering of those attributes most likely to be relevant for explaining the phenomena observed. This paper uses a series of recent case reports to explore the role of cases in casual attribution in medical diagnosis. It is argued that cases are brought together by practitioners (...)
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  3. Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2014). Double Meanings Will Not Save the Principle of Double Effect. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):304-316.
    In an article somewhat ironically entitled “Disambiguating Clinical Intentions,” Lynn Jansen promotes an idea that should be bewildering to anyone familiar with the literature on the intention/foresight distinction. According to Jansen, “intention” has two commonsense meanings, one of which is equivalent to “foresight.” Consequently, questions about intention are “infected” with ambiguity—people cannot tell what they mean and do not know how to answer them. This hypothesis is unsupported by evidence, but Jansen states it as if it were accepted fact. In (...)
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  4. Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2013). Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice. Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of life. The (...)
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  5. Rachel A. Ankeny (2012). Detecting Themes and Variations: The Use of Cases in Developmental Biology. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):644-654.
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  6. Sabina Leonelli & Rachel A. Ankeny (2012). Re-Thinking Organisms: The Impact of Databases on Model Organism Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):29-36.
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  7. Rachel A. Ankeny & Sabina Leonelli (2011). Bioethics Authorship in Context: How Trends in Biomedicine Challenge Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (10):22 - 24.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 10, Page 22-24, October 2011.
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  8. Rachel A. Ankeny & Sabina Leonelli (2011). What's so Special About Model Organisms? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (2):313-323.
  9. Rachel Ankeny, Hasok Chang, Marcel Boumans & Mieke Boon (2011). Introduction: Philosophy of Science in Practice. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):303-307.
    Introduction: philosophy of science in practice Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Article Pages 303-307 DOI 10.1007/s13194-011-0036-4 Authors Rachel Ankeny, School of History & Politics, University of Adelaide, Napier Building, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia Hasok Chang, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, Free School Lane, Cambridge, CB2 3RH UK Marcel Boumans, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65-67, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands Mieke Boon, Department of Philosophy, University of (...)
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  10. Sabina Leonelli & Rachel Ankeny (2011). What’s so Special About Model Organisms? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (2):313-323.
    This paper aims to identify the key characteristics of model organisms that make them a specific type of model within the contemporary life sciences: in particular, we argue that the term “model organism” does not apply to all organisms used for the purposes of experimental research. We explore the differences between experimental and model organisms in terms of their material and epistemic features, and argue that it is essential to distinguish between their representational scope and representational target. We also examine (...)
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  11. Rachel Ankeny (2010). Second Biennial Conference of the Society for Philosophy of Science in Practice (University of Minnesota, 18–20 June 2009). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (1):233 - 235.
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  12. Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny (2008). Managing Intentions: The End-of-Life Administration of Analgesics and Sedatives, and the Possibility of Slow Euthanasia. Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs are performing 'slow euthanasia.' On the one hand analgesics and sedatives can do much to relieve suffering in the terminally ill. On the other hand, they can hasten death. According to a standard view, the administration of analgesics and sedatives amounts to euthanasia when the drugs are given with an intention to hasten death. In this (...)
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  13. Jane Maienschein, Mary Sunderland, Rachel A. Ankeny & Jason Scott Robert (2008). The Ethos and Ethics of Translational Research. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):43 – 51.
    Calls for the “translation” of research from bench to bedside are increasingly demanding. What is translation, and why does it matter? We sketch the recent history of outcome-oriented translational research in the United States, with a particular focus on the Roadmap Initiative of the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD). Our main example of contemporary translational research is stem cell research, which has superseded genomics as the translational object of choice. We explore the nature of and obstacles to translational research (...)
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  14. Jason Scott Robert, Mary Sunderland, Rachel Ankeny & Jane Maienschein (2008). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Ethos and Ethics of Translational Research”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):1-3.
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  15. Rachel A. Ankeny (2007). Individual Responsibility and Reproduction. In Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
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  16. Susan Dodds & Rachel A. Ankeny (2006). Regulation of hESC Research in Australia: Promises and Pitfalls for Deliberative Democratic Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):95-107.
    This paper considers the legislative debates in Australia that led to the passage of the Research Involving Human Embryos Act (Cth 2002) and the Prohibition of Human Cloning Act (Cth 2002). In the first part of the paper, we discuss the debate surrounding the legislation with particular emphasis on the ways in which demands for public consultation, public debate and the education of Australians about the potential ethical and scientific impact of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) research were deployed, and (...)
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  17. Tamra Lysaght, Rachel A. Ankeny & Ian Kerridge (2006). The Scope of Public Discourse Surrounding Proposition 71: Looking Beyond the Moral Status of the Embryo. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):109-119.
    Human embryonic stem cell research has generated considerable discussion and debate in bioethics. Bioethical discourse tends to focus on the moral status of the embryo as the central issue, however, and it is unclear how much this reflects broader community values and beliefs related to stem cell research. This paper presents the results of a study which aims to identify and classify the issues and arguments that have arisen in public discourse associated with one prominent policy episode in (...)
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  18. John E. J. Rasko, Gabrielle O'Sullivan & Rachel A. Ankeny (eds.) (2006). The Ethics of Inheritable Genetic Modification: A Dividing Line? Cambridge University Press.
    Is inheritable genetic modification the new dividing line in gene therapy? The editors of this searching investigation, representing clinical medicine, public health and biomedical ethics, have established a distinguished team of scientists and scholars to address the issues from the perspectives of biological and social science, law and ethics, including an intriguing Foreword from Peter Singer. Their purpose is to consider how society might deal with the ethical concerns raised by inheritable genetic modification, and to re-examine prevailing views about whether (...)
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  19. Gabrielle Samuel, Rachel Ankeny & Ian Kerridge (2006). Mixing Metaphors in Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):58-59.
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  20. Rachel A. Ankeny (2004). Dealing Drugs with the Bush. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (03):241-244.
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  21. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig (2004). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
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  22. Rachel A. Ankeny & Ian Kerridge (2004). On Not Taking Objective Risk Assessments at Face Value. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):35 – 37.
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  23. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). Angela N.H. Creager,The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930–1965. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (3):341-344.
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  24. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). Back to Basics for Bioethics. Metascience 12 (2):177-182.
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  25. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). How History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Could Save the Life of Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):115 – 125.
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  26. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). No Real Categories, Only Chimeras and Illusions: The Interplay Between Morality and Science in Debates Over Embryonic Chimeras. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):31-33.
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  27. Rachel A. Ankeny (2003). A View of Bioethics From Down Under. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (03):242-246.
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  28. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Alister Browne, Nuket Buken, Murat Civaner, Arthur R. Derse, Brent Dickson, Dan Eastwood, Todd Gilmer & Michael L. Gross (2003). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:229-231.
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  29. Rachel Allyson Ankeny (2003). Piecing Together the Mosaic of Virus History (Book Review of Angela NH Creager, The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Esperimental Model, 1930-1965). [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (3):341-344.
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  30. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). Model Organisms as Models: Understanding the 'Lingua Franca' of the Human Genome Project. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S251-.
    Through an examination of the actual research strategies and assumptions underlying the Human Genome Project (HGP), it is argued that the epistemic basis of the initial model organism programs is not best understood as reasoning via causal analog models (CAMs). In order to answer a series of questions about what is being modeled and what claims about the models are warranted, a descriptive epistemological method is employed that uses historical techniques to develop detailed accounts which, in turn, help to reveal (...)
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  31. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). Send in the Clones. Metascience 10 (3):401-405.
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  32. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). The Moral Status of Preferences for Directed Donation: Who Should Decide Who Gets Transplantable Organs? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):387-398.
    Bioethics has entered a new era: as many commentators have noted, the familiar mantra of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice has proven to be an overly simplistic framework for understanding problems that arise in modern medicine, particularly at the intersection of public policy and individual preferences. A tradition of liberal pluralism grounds respect for individual preferences and affirmation of competing conceptions of the good. But we struggle to maintain (or at times explicitly reject) this tradition in the face of individual (...)
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  33. Rachel Allyson Ankeny (2001). Cloning Around (Survey Review of Books on Cloning). Metascience 10 (3):401-405.
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  34. Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):272.
    The biological sciences have become increasingly reliant on so-called 'model organisms'. I argue that in this domain, the concept of a descriptive model is essential for understanding scientific practice. Using a case study, I show how such a model was formulated in a preexplanatory context for subsequent use as a prototype from which explanations ultimately may be generated both within the immediate domain of the original model and in additional, related domains. To develop this concept of a descriptive model, I (...)
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  35. Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Marvelling at the Marvel: The Supposed Conversion of A. D. Darbishire to Mendelism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (2):315 - 347.
    The so-called "biometric-Mendelian controversy" has received much attention from science studies scholars. This paper focuses on one scientist involved in this debate, Arthur Dukinfield Darbishire, who performed a series of hybridization experiments with mice beginning in 1901. Previous historical work on Darbishire's experiments and his later attempt to reconcile Mendelian and biometric views describe Darbishire as eventually being "converted" to Mendelism. I provide a new analysis of this episode in the context of Darbishire's experimental results, his underlying epistemology, and his (...)
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  36. Manfred D. Laubichier & Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
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  37. David Turnbull, Henry Krips, Val Dusek, Steve Fuller, Alan Sokal, Jean Bricmont, Alan Frost, Alan Chalmers, Anna Salleh, Alfred I. Tauber, Yvonne Luxford, Nicolaas Rupke, Steven French, Peter G. Brown, Hugh LaFollette, Peter Machamer, Nicolas Rasmussen, Andy J. Miller, Marya Schechtman, Ross S. West, John Forge, David Oldroyd, Nancy Demand, Darrin W. Belousek, Warren Schmaus, Sungook Hong, Rachel A. Ankeny, Peter Anstey, Jeremy Butterfield & Harshi Gunawardena (2000). Clarity, Charity and Criticism, Wit, Wisdom and Worldliness: Avoiding Intellectual Impositions. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (3):347-498.
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  38. Rachel A. Ankeny (1999). Recasting the Debate on Multiple Listing for Transplantation Through Consideration of Both Principles and Practice. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (03):330-339.
    Debates continue to surround the system in the United States for allocating transplantable cadaveric organs, due in large part to the scarcity of such organs in relation to the number of individuals waiting to undergo transplantation. Candidates awaiting transplantation gain access to cadaveric organs by being placed by individual transplant programs on the national list of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), overseen by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). In recent years, the UNOS board has visited (and (...)
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  39. Rachel Ankeny (1997). Paul Rabinow, Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (1):67-69.
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