16 found
Sort by:
  1. Rachel Zuckert (2013). After Herder: Philosophy of Language in the German Tradition, by Michael N. Forster. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 21 (S1):E7--E12.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Rachel Zuckert (2012). Gerard, Kames, Alison, and Stewart. In Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.), The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press. 64.
  3. Rachel Zuckert (2010). Kant's Account of Practical Fanaticism. In Benjamin Lipscomb & James Krueger (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics: God, Freedom, and Immortality. De Gruyter. 291.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Rachel Zuckert (2010). sChelling and Hegel. In Dean Moyar (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. 165.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Rachel Zuckert (2009). Kames's Naturalist Aesthetics and the Case of Tragedy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (2):147-162.
    In this essay, I discuss Kames' aesthetic theory, as presented in his essay, ‘Our Attachment to Objects of Distress’ (concerning the problem of tragedy), and in Elements of Criticism. I argue that Kames' (non-)response to the problem of tragedy – that we find tragedies painful (not pleasing), yet are ‘attracted to them through the workings of the “blind instinct” of sympathy’ – is intended to call the standard formulation of the problem of tragedy (‘why do we find such painful things (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Rachel Zuckert (2009). Sculpture and Touch: Herder's Aesthetics of Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):285-299.
  7. Rachel Zuckert (2007). Kant on Beauty and Biology: An Interpretation of the Critique of Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book is the first to interpret the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains. She argues that on Kant's view, human beings demonstrate a distinctive cognitive ability in appreciating beauty and understanding organic life: an ability to anticipate a whole that we do not completely understand according to preconceived categories. This ability is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Rachel Zuckert (2007). Kant's Rationalist Aesthetics. Kant-Studien 98 (4):443-463.
    It is quite standard, even banal, to describe Kant's project in the Critique of Pure Reason [KrV] as a critical reconciliation of rationalism and empiricism, most directly expressed in Kant's claim that intuitions and concepts are two distinct, yet equally necessary, and necessarily interdependent sources of cognition. Similarly, though Kant rejects both the rationalist foundation of morality in the concept of perfection and that of the empiricists in feeling or in the moral sense, one might broadly characterize Kant's moral philosophy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Rachel Zuckert (2006). Expressivism and Aesthetics. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 27 (2):1-24.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Rachel Zuckert (2006). The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):599-622.
  11. Rachel Zuckert (2005). Boring Beauty and Universal Morality: Kant on the Ideal of Beauty. Inquiry 48 (2):107 – 130.
    This paper argues that Kant's account of the "ideal of beauty" in paragraph 17 of the Critique of Judgment is not only a plausible account of one kind of beauty ("boring" beauty), but also that it can address some of our moral qualms concerning the aesthetic evaluation of persons, including our psychological propensity to take a person's beauty to represent her moral character.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Rachel Zuckert (2005). Living with Nietzsche. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):453-454.
  13. Rachel Zuckert (2004). Review of Karl Ameriks, Interpreting Kant's Critiques. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (5).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Rachel Zuckert (2003). Awe or Envy: Herder Contra Kant on the Sublime. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):217–232.
  15. Rachel Zuckert (2003). Review of Rodolphe Gasche, The Idea of Form: Rethinking Kant's Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (6).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rachel Zuckert (2002). A New Look at Kant's Theory of Pleasure. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):239–252.
    I argue (contra Guyer et al.) that in the Critique of Judgment Kant espouses a formal, intentional theory of pleasure, and reconstruct Kant's arguments that this view can both identify what all pleasures have in common, and differentiate among kinds of pleasure. Through his investigation of aesthetic experience in the Critique of Judgment, I argue, Kant radically departs from his views about pleasure as mere sensation in the Groundwork and the Critique of Practical Reason, and provides a view of pleasure (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation