Search results for 'Radical economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eli Berman (2009). Radical, Religious, and Violent: The New Economics of Terrorism. The MIT Press.
    How do radical religious sects run such deadly terrorist organizations? Hezbollah, Hamas, Lashkar-e-Taiba, and the Taliban all began as religious groups dedicated to piety and charity. Yet once they turned to violence, they became horribly potent, executing campaigns of terrorism deadlier than those of their secular rivals. In [title], Eli Berman approaches the question using the economics of organizations. He first dispels some myths: radical religious terrorists are not generally motivated by the promise of rewards in the (...)
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  2.  16
    Robert Mulligan (2006). Transactional Economics: John Dewey's Ways of Knowing and the Radical Subjectivism of the Austrian School. Education and Culture 22 (2):61-82.
    The subjectivism of the Austrian school of economics is a special case of Dewey's transactional philosophy, also known as pragmatism or pragmatic epistemology. The Austrian economists Carl Friedrich Menger (1840-1921) and Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973) adopted an Aristotelian deductive approach to economic issues such as social behavior and exchange. Like Menger and Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) viewed scientific knowledge, even in the social sciences, as asserting and aiming for objective certainty. Hayek was particularly critical of attempts to apply (...)
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  3. Eli Berman (2011). Radical, Religious, and Violent: The New Economics of Terrorism. The MIT Press.
    How do radical religious sects run such deadly terrorist organizations? Hezbollah, Hamas, Lashkar-e-Taiba, and the Taliban all began as religious groups dedicated to piety and charity. Yet once they turned to violence, they became horribly potent, executing campaigns of terrorism deadlier than those of their secular rivals. In [title], Eli Berman approaches the question using the economics of organizations. He first dispels some myths: radical religious terrorists are not generally motivated by the promise of rewards in the (...)
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  4. Francis Dupuis-Déri & Arnold L. Farr (2013). And Economics, with a Concentration in Globalization, at the University of Pennsylvania, and She Recently Studied English at King's College in London. She is Interested in Human Rights and Genocide Studies. She is the Associate Editor of “Critical Refusals,” the 2013 Double Special Issue of the Radical Phi. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (2):679-683.
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  5. Richard John Neuhaus (1984). Demo[C]Racy, Economics, and Radical Pluralism. In Adlai E. Stevenson & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), The Citizen and His Government. Distributed by the University of Texas Press
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  6.  26
    D. Wade Hands (2012). Realism, Commonsensibles, and Economics:The Case of Contemporary Revealed Preference Theory. In Aki Lehtinen, Jaakko Kuorikoski & Petri Ylikoski (eds.), Economics for Real: Uskali Mäki and the Place of Truth in Economics. Routledge 156-178.
    This paper challenges Mäki's argument about commonsensibles by offering a case study from contemporary microeconomics – contemporary revealed preference theory (hereafter CRPT) – where terms like "preference," "utility," and to some extent "choice," are radical departures from the common sense meanings of these terms. Although the argument challenges the claim that economics is inhabited solely by commonsensibles, it is not inconsistent with such folk notions being common in economic theory.
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  7.  87
    Christian List & Franz Dietrich (forthcoming). Mentalism Versus Behaviourism in Economics: A Philosophy-of-Science Perspective. Economics and Philosophy.
    Behaviourism is the view that preferences, beliefs, and other mental states in social-scientific theories are nothing but constructs re-describing people's behaviour. Mentalism is the view that they capture real phenomena, on a par with the unobservables in science, such as electrons and electromagnetic fields. While behaviourism has gone out of fashion in psychology, it remains influential in economics, especially in ‘ revealed preference ’ theory. We defend mentalism in economics, construed as a positive science, and show that it (...)
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  8.  38
    Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
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  9.  10
    Martin K. Jones (2011). External Validity and Libraries of Phenomena: A Critique of Guala's Methodology of Experimental Economics. Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):247-271.
    Francesco Guala has developed some novel and radical ideas on the problem of external validity, a topic that has not received much attention in the experimental economics literature. In this paper I argue that his views on external validity are not justified and the conclusions which he draws from these views, if widely adopted, could substantially undermine the experimental economics enterprise. In rejecting the justification of these views, the paper reaffirms the importance of experiments in economics.
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  10.  17
    Vincent Blok (2013). The Power of Speech Acts: Reflections on a Performative Concept of Ethical Oaths in Economics and Business. Review of Social Economy 71 (2):187-208.
    Ethical oaths for bankers, economists and managers are increasingly seen as successful instruments to ensure more responsible behaviour. In this article, we reflect on the nature of ethical oaths. Based on John Austin's speech act theory and the work of Emmanuel Levinas, we introduce a performative concept of ethical oaths that is characterised by (1) the existential self-performative of the one I want to be, which is (2) demanded by the public context. Because ethical oaths are (3) structurally threatened by (...)
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  11.  4
    Nicholas Bardsley (2005). Experimental Economics and the Artificiality of Alteration. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):239-251.
    A neglected critique of social science laboratories alleges that they implement phenomena different to those supposedly under investigation. The critique purports to be conceptual and so invulnerable to a technical solution. I argue that it undermines some economics designs seeking to implement features of real societies, and counsels more modesty in experimental write?ups. It also constitutes a plausible argument that laboratory economics experiments are necessarily less demonstrative than natural scientific ones. More radical sceptical conclusions are unwarranted.
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  12.  3
    Angus Burgin (2009). The Radical Conservatism of Frank H. Knight. Modern Intellectual History 6 (3):513-538.
    This article examines the most prominent interwar economist at the University of Chicago, Frank Knight, through the lens of a controversial 1932 lecture in which he exhorted his audience to vote Communist. The fact that he did so poses a historical problem: why did the premier American exponent of conservative economic principles appear to advocate a vote for radical change? This article argues that the speech is representative of Knight's deliberately paradoxical approach, in which he refused to praise markets (...)
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  13.  67
    Lonnie Athens (2007). Radical Interactionism: Going Beyond Mead. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (2):137–165.
    George Herbert Mead argues that human society is comprised of six basic institutions—language, family, economics, religion, polity, and science. I do not believe that he can be criticized for making institutions the cornerstones of a society, but he can definitely be criticized for his explanation of how our basic institutions originate, how these institutions operate in society after their inception, and how they later change, modifying society in the process. The problem with Mead's explanation of these three critical matters (...)
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  14.  77
    David Ellerman (1992). Property and Contract in Economics: The Case for Economic Democracy. Blackwell.
    From a pre-publication review by the late Austrian economist, Don Lavoie, of George Mason University: -/- "The book's radical re-interpretation of property and contract is, I think, among the most powerful critiques of mainstream economics ever developed. It undermines the neoclassical way of thinking about property by articulating a theory of inalienable rights, and constructs out of this perspective a "labor theory of property" which is as different from Marx's labor theory of value as it is from neoclassicism. (...)
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  15.  4
    Amanda Fulford (2015). Higher Education, Collaboration and a New Economics. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2).
    In this article I take as my starting point the economist, Jeremy Rifkin's, claims about the rise of what he calls the ‘collaborative commons’. For Rifkin, this is nothing less than the emergence of a new economic paradigm where traditional consumers exploit the possibilities of technology, and position themselves as ‘pro-sumers’. This emphasises their role in production rather than consumption alone, and shows how they aim to bypass a range of capitalist markets, from publishing to the music industry. In asking (...)
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  16. Chris Matthew Sciabarra (1988). Toward a Radical Critique of Utopianism: Dialectics and Dualism in the Works Offriedrich Hayek, Murray Rothbard and Karl Marx. Dissertation, New York University
    This thesis develops a radical critique of utopian thinking by examining the dialectical and dualistic methodological elements in Hayekian, Rothbardian, and Marxian theory. Utopianism is defined as an abstract, dualistic, ahistorical form of social thought. Its central failure is its inability to resolve the polarity between its progressive intentions and the emergent, unintended consequences of human interaction. It grants to men an illusory degree of cognitive efficacy in its construction of a new society. Radicalism, however, recognizes socio-historical conditions in (...)
     
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  17. Ferdinando Targetti (1992). Nicholas Kaldor: The Economics and Politics of Capitalism as a Dynamic System. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Nicholas Kaldor was one of this century's most original thinkers on economics, his influence on British economic policy second only to that of Keynes. This book traces the development of Kaldor's thought as it underwent a remarkable evolution from his membership of the Austrian neoclassical school to his embracing of radical Keynesianism. He was also extremely quick to grasp essential changes in economic reality and to forge analytical tools to explain them. Although he was innovative from 1938 onwards, (...)
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  18.  23
    Mathias Thaler (2012). Deep Contextualism and Radical Criticism: The Argument for a Division of Labour in Contemporary Political Theory. In José Maria Castro Caldas & Vítor Neves (eds.), Facts, Values and Objectivity in Economics. Routledge
    This paper sheds light on the main issue of this book by affording a side look at a discipline other than economics, namely political theory. It is argued that the contemporary debate in political theory hinges on the question of 'realism'. Through a discussion of Raymond Geuss's work, the paper seeks to show that political theory remains caught between the conflicting requirements of deep contextual analysis and radically critical engagement with the world 'as it is'. Finally, the idea of (...)
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  19.  17
    Jan-Willem Romeijn & Olivier Roy (2014). Radical Uncertainty: Beyond Probabilistic Models of Belief. Erkenntnis 79 (6):1221-1223.
    Over the past decades or so the probabilistic model of rational belief has enjoyed increasing interest from researchers in epistemology and the philosophy of science. Of course, such probabilistic models were used for much longer in economics, in game theory, and in other disciplines concerned with decision making. Moreover, Carnap and co-workers used probability theory to explicate philosophical notions of confirmation and induction, thereby targeting epistemic rather than decision-theoretic aspects of rationality. However, following Carnap’s early applications, philosophy has more (...)
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  20.  10
    David L. Prychitko (1993). Formalism in Austrian‐School Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge? Critical Review 7 (4):567-592.
    Contemporary Austrian?school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free?market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
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  21.  20
    Bernard Hodgson (2005). Thinking and Acting Outside the Neo-Classical Economic Box: Reply to McMurtry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):289 - 303.
    This paper responds to Professor John McMurtry, primarily to his critique of my recent book, Economics as Moral Science . Although agreeing with my attribution of a "moral a priorism" to orthodox or neo-classical economics, McMurtry takes issue with my "conversion thesis", that an a priori, ethically committed theory can be transformed into a testable empirical science of actual behaviour through the application of institutional constraints to individual motivations. McMurtry views such a thesis as "logically possible but morally (...)
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  22.  4
    Paulo Fernando Carneiro Andrade (2010). O Cristianismo diante dos Desafios da Globalização Econômica e Cultural (Christianity before the challenges of economic globalization and cultural) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n15p110. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (15):110-121.
    O presente artigo objetiva refletir sobre os impactos da globalização econômica na cultura contemporânea. O processo acelerado de transformação da cultura e das relações sociais distingue-se de outros processos de mudança estrutural porque as mudanças no campo da economia desde a década de 1980 provocaram uma grave crise cultural. O que mais caracteriza os novos tempos é a expansão do mercado que se torna omniabrangente e omnipresente, transformando as relações humanas em relações de mercado. Globalização neoliberal e a expansão do (...)
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  23. Christine Battersby, Frederick Lee & Sandra Harley (1997). Dictating Research: Feminist Philosophy and the RAE; The Case of Economics. Radical Philosophy 85.
     
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  24. B. Brecher (forthcoming). Elizabeth Anderson, Value in Ethics and Economics. Radical Philosophy.
     
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  25. Bob Brecher (1995). Value in Ethics and Economics. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 71.
     
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  26. Diana Coole (2000). Conference Report: Political Studies Association Annual Conference, London School of Economics, 10–13 April 2000. Radical Philosophy 102.
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  27. Elias L. Khalil (2008). Action, Entrepreneurship and Evolution.”. In Weber (ed.), Handbook of Whiteheadian Process Thought. De Gruyter 145-160.
    This chapter offers a subtle but subversive thesis: There is no difference between everyday action and creativity and, consequently, evolution. This thesis is subversive. It goes against the dominant dogmas in economics (i.e., neoclassical theory) and evolutionary biology (i.e., neo-Darwinian theory). Both dogmas draw a radical divide between action and evolution. For neo-Darwinian theory, action is phenotype ultimately determined by genotype—while the genotype evolves according to another mechanism. For neoclassical economics, action is determined by rational calculation of (...)
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  28. Warren Montag (2005). Necro-Economics: Adam Smith and Death in the Life of the Universal. Radical Philosophy 134:7.
     
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  29.  35
    Adrian Pabst (2013). The Genesis and Ethos of the Market, Luigino Bruni. Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 240 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):430-437.
    Both modern political economy and capitalism rest on the separation of economics from ethics, which in turn can be traced to a number of shifts within philosophy and theology – notably the move away from practices of reciprocity and the common good towards the sole pursuit of individual freedom and self-interest. In his latest book, Luigino Bruni provides a compelling critique of capitalist markets and an alternative vision that fuses Aristotelian-Thomist virtue ethics with the Renaissance and Neapolitan Enlightenment tradition (...)
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  30. Martin O'Neill, Piketty, Meade and Predistribution. Crooked Timber Book Seminar on Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century.
    If solutions to the problem of inequality are to be as radical as reality now demands, what is instead required is a reimagining of what would be involved comprehensively to tame capitalism through democratic means. This will involve much further development of the kind of plurality of institutional and policy proposals sketched by Meade, and will involve both the private and public – individual and collective – forms of capital predistribution that Meade advocated. Piketty, like Meade, sees the need (...)
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  31. Christopher Clarke (forthcoming). Preferences and Positivist Methodology in Economics. Philosophy of Science.
    I distinguish several doctrines that economic methodologists have found attractive, all of which have a positivist flavour. One of these is the doctrine that preference assignments in economics are just shorthand descriptions of agents' choice behaviour. Although most of these doctrines are problematic, the latter doctrine about preference assignments is a respectable one, I argue. It doesn't entail any of the problematic doctrines, and indeed it is warranted independently of them.
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  32.  11
    Eric Palmer (forthcoming). Less Radical Enlightenment: A Christian Wing of the French Enlightenment. In Steffen Ducheyne (ed.), Reassessing the Radical Enlightenment. Routledge
    (Forthcoming 2016: pre-review draft link below) Jonathan I. Israel claims that Christian ‘controversialists’ endeavoured first to obscure or efface Spinozism, materialism, and non-authoritarian free thought, and then, in the early eighteenth century, to fight these openly, and desperately. Israel appears to have adopted the view of enlightenment as a battle against what Voltaire has called ‘l’infâme’, and David Hume has labelled ‘stupidity, Christianity, and ignorance’. These authors’ barbs were launched later in the century, however, in the period of the high (...)
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  33.  64
    D. Wade Hands (2013). Mark Blaug on the Normativity of Welfare Economics. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6:1-25.
    Abstract: This paper examines Mark Blaug's position on the normative character of Paretian welfare economics: in general, and specifically with respect to his debate with Pieter Hennipman over this question during the 1990s. The paper also clarifies some of the confusions that emerged within the context of this debate, and closes by providing some additional arguments supporting Blaug's position that he himself did not provide.
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  34.  45
    Anna Alexandrova & Robert Northcott (2009). Progress in Economics: Lessons From the Spectrum Auctions. In Harold Kincaid & Don Ross (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Oxford University Press 306--337.
    The 1994 US spectrum auction is now a paradigmatic case of the successful use of microeconomic theory for policy-making. We use a detailed analysis of it to review standard accounts in philosophy of science of how idealized models are connected to messy reality. We show that in order to understand what made the design of the spectrum auction successful, a new such account is required, and we present it here. Of especial interest is the light this sheds on the issue (...)
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  35.  73
    Christine Clavien & Rebekka A. Klein (2010). Eager for Fairness or for Revenge? Psychological Altruism in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):267-290.
    To understand the human capacity for psychological altruism, one requires a proper understanding of how people actually think and feel. This paper addresses the possible relevance of recent findings in experimental economics and neuroeconomics to the philosophical controversy over altruism and egoism. After briefly sketching and contextualizing the controversy, we survey and discuss the results of various studies on behaviourally altruistic helping and punishing behaviour, which provide stimulating clues for the debate over psychological altruism. On closer analysis, these studies (...)
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  36. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly (...)
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  37. Deirdre N. McCloskey (2006). The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce. University of Chicago Press.
    For a century and a half, the artists and intellectuals of Europe have scorned the bourgeoisie. And for a millennium and a half, the philosophers and theologians of Europe have scorned the marketplace. The bourgeois life, capitalism, Mencken’s “booboisie” and David Brooks’s “bobos”—all have been, and still are, framed as being responsible for everything from financial to moral poverty, world wars, and spiritual desuetude. Countering these centuries of assumptions and unexamined thinking is Deirdre McCloskey’s _The Bourgeois Virtues_, a magnum opus (...)
     
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  38.  9
    Megan Blomfield (2012). Ethics in Economics: Lessons From Human Subjects Research. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):24-44.
    Many economists, it is said, “are inclined to deny that moral philosophy has anything to do with economics” . In this paper I challenge such inclinations bydrawing an analogy between economic interventions and humansubjects research. It is undeniable that investigators engaged in thelatter should adhere to specific ethical principles. I argue that analogousfeatures of economic interventions should lead us to recognise thatsimilar ethical concerns actually arise in both activities, and thusthat economic interventions should also be conducted in accordancewith ethical (...)
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  39.  18
    Barry Smith (1994). The Philosophy of Austrian Economics. [REVIEW] Review of Austrian Economics 7:127–132.
    Review of David Gordon, The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics.
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  40.  39
    Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie (...)
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  41.  56
    Tony Lawson (1997). Economics and Reality. Routledge.
    There is an increasingly widespread belief, both within and outside the discipline, that modern economics is irrelevant to the understanding of the real world. Economics and Reality traces this irrelevance to the failure of economists to match their methods with their subject, showing that formal, mathematical models are unsuitable to the social realities economists purport to address. Tony Lawson examines the various ways in which mainstream economics is rooted in positivist philosophy and examines the problems this causes. (...)
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  42.  38
    John Broome (1999). Ethics Out of Economics. Cambridge University Press.
    Many economic problems are also ethical problems: should we value economic equality? how much should we care about preserving the environment? how should medical resources be divided between saving life and enhancing life? This book examines some of the practical issues that lie between economics and ethics, and shows how utility theory can contribute to ethics. John Broome's work has, unusually, combined sophisticated economic and philosophical expertise, and Ethics Out of Economics brings together some of his most important (...)
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  43.  40
    Paul Bloom (2013). Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil. Crown.
    A leading cognitive scientist argues that a deep sense of good and evil is bred in the bone. From John Locke to Sigmund Freud, philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates. Many of us take for granted that babies are born selfish and that it is the role of society—and especially parents—to transform them from little sociopaths into civilized beings. In Just Babies, Paul Bloom argues that humans are in fact hardwired with a (...)
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  44.  48
    Vernon L. Smith (2008). Rationality in Economics: Constructivist and Ecological Forms. Cambridge University Press.
    The principal findings of experimental economics are that impersonal exchange in markets converges in repeated interaction to the equilibrium states implied by economic theory, under information conditions far weaker than specified in the theory. In personal, social, and economic exchange, as studied in two-person games, cooperation exceeds the prediction of traditional game theory. This book relates these two findings to field studies and applications and integrates them with the main themes of the Scottish Enlightenment and with the thoughts of (...)
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  45.  51
    Alexander Rosenberg (1992). Economics: Mathematical Politics or Science of Diminishing Returns? University of Chicago Press.
    Economics today cannot predict the likely outcome of specific events any better than it could in the time of Adam Smith. This is Alexander Rosenberg's controversial challenge to the scientific status of economics. Rosenberg explains that the defining characteristic of any science is predictive improvability--the capacity to create more precise forecasts by evaluating the success of earlier predictions--and he forcefully argues that because economics has not been able to increase its predictive power for over two centuries, it (...)
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  46.  36
    Benedetta Giovanola (2009). Re-Thinking the Anthropological and Ethical Foundation of Economics and Business: Human Richness and Capabilities Enhancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):431 - 444.
    This article aims at showing the need for a sound ethical and anthropological foundation of economics and business, and argues the importance of a correct understanding of human values and human nature for the sake of economics and of businesses themselves. It is suggested that the ethical-anthropological side of economics and business can be grasped by taking Aristotle’s virtue ethics and Amartya Sen’s capability approach (CA) as major reference points. We hold that an “Aristotelian economics of (...)
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  47.  74
    Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Radical Concept Nativism. Cognition 86 (1):25-55.
    Radical concept nativism is the thesis that virtually all lexical concepts are innate. Notoriously endorsed by Jerry Fodor (1975, 1981), radical concept nativism has had few supporters. However, it has proven difficult to say exactly what’s wrong with Fodor’s argument. We show that previous responses are inadequate on a number of grounds. Chief among these is that they typically do not achieve sufficient distance from Fodor’s dialectic, and, as a result, they do not illuminate the central question of (...)
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  48.  90
    Elizabeth Anderson (1993). Value in Ethics and Economics. Harvard University Press.
    Women as commercial baby factories, nature as an economic resource, life as one big shopping mall: This is what we get when we use the market as a common ...
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  49.  43
    David Roden, Reduction, Elimination and Radical Uninterpretability.
    In this paper I argue that the anti-reductionist thesis supports a case for the uselessness of intentional idioms in the interpretation of highly flexible, self-modifying agents that I refer to as “hyperplastic” agents. An agent is hyperplastic if it can make arbitrarily fine changes to any part of its functional or physical structure without compromising its agency or its capacity for hyperplasticity. Using Davidson’s anomalous monism (AM) as an exemplar of anti-reductionism, I argue that AM implies that no hyperplastic could (...)
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  50. Philippe Mongin (2006). Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics. Economica 73 (290):257-286.
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than the other (...)
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