Search results for 'Radical economics' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Robert Mulligan (2006). Transactional Economics: John Dewey's Ways of Knowing and the Radical Subjectivism of the Austrian School. Education and Culture 22 (2):61-82.score: 96.0
    The subjectivism of the Austrian school of economics is a special case of Dewey's transactional philosophy, also known as pragmatism or pragmatic epistemology. The Austrian economists Carl Friedrich Menger (1840-1921) and Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973) adopted an Aristotelian deductive approach to economic issues such as social behavior and exchange. Like Menger and Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) viewed scientific knowledge, even in the social sciences, as asserting and aiming for objective certainty. Hayek was particularly critical of attempts to apply (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Francis Dupuis-Déri & Arnold L. Farr (2013). And Economics, with a Concentration in Globalization, at the University of Pennsylvania, and She Recently Studied English at King's College in London. She is Interested in Human Rights and Genocide Studies. She is the Associate Editor of “Critical Refusals,” the 2013 Double Special Issue of the Radical Phi. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (2):679-683.score: 78.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Eli Berman (2009). Radical, Religious, and Violent: The New Economics of Terrorism. The Mit Press.score: 72.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard John Neuhaus (1984). Demo[C]Racy, Economics, and Radical Pluralism. In Adlai E. Stevenson & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), The Citizen and His Government. Distributed by the University of Texas Press.score: 72.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Martin K. Jones (2011). External Validity and Libraries of Phenomena: A Critique of Guala's Methodology of Experimental Economics. Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):247-271.score: 48.0
    Francesco Guala has developed some novel and radical ideas on the problem of external validity, a topic that has not received much attention in the experimental economics literature. In this paper I argue that his views on external validity are not justified and the conclusions which he draws from these views, if widely adopted, could substantially undermine the experimental economics enterprise. In rejecting the justification of these views, the paper reaffirms the importance of experiments in economics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Nicholas Bardsley (2005). Experimental Economics and the Artificiality of Alteration. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):239-251.score: 44.0
    A neglected critique of social science laboratories alleges that they implement phenomena different to those supposedly under investigation. The critique purports to be conceptual and so invulnerable to a technical solution. I argue that it undermines some economics designs seeking to implement features of real societies, and counsels more modesty in experimental write?ups. It also constitutes a plausible argument that laboratory economics experiments are necessarily less demonstrative than natural scientific ones. More radical sceptical conclusions are unwarranted.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Christian List & Franz Dietrich, Mentalism Versus Behaviourism in Economics: A Philosophy-of-Science Perspective.score: 42.0
    Behaviourism is the view that preferences, beliefs, and other mental states in social-scientific theories are nothing but constructs re-describing people's behavioural dispositions. Mentalism is the view that they capture real phenomena, no less existent than the unobservable entities and properties in the natural sciences, such as electrons and electromagnetic fields. While behaviourism has long gone out of fashion in psychology and linguistics, it remains influential in economics, especially in `revealed preference' theory. We aim to (i) clear up some common (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Bernard Hodgson (2005). Thinking and Acting Outside the Neo-Classical Economic Box: Reply to McMurtry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):289 - 303.score: 42.0
    This paper responds to Professor John McMurtry, primarily to his critique (Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 44, 2003) of my recent book, Economics as Moral Science (Springer-Verlag, 2001). Although agreeing with my attribution of a moral a priorism to orthodox or neo-classical economics, McMurtry takes issue with my conversion thesis, that ana priori, ethically committed theory can be transformed into a testable empirical science of actual behaviour through the application of institutional constraints to individual motivations. McMurtry views such (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David Ellerman (1992). Property and Contract in Economics: The Case for Economic Democracy. Blackwell.score: 42.0
    From a pre-publication review by the late Austrian economist, Don Lavoie, of George Mason University: -/- "The book's radical re-interpretation of property and contract is, I think, among the most powerful critiques of mainstream economics ever developed. It undermines the neoclassical way of thinking about property by articulating a theory of inalienable rights, and constructs out of this perspective a "labor theory of property" which is as different from Marx's labor theory of value as it is from neoclassicism. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Vincent Blok (2013). The Power of Speech Acts: Reflections on a Performative Concept of Ethical Oaths in Economics and Business. Review of Social Economy 71 (2):187-208.score: 42.0
    Ethical oaths for bankers, economists and managers are increasingly seen as successful instruments to ensure more responsible behaviour. In this article, we reflect on the nature of ethical oaths. Based on John Austin's speech act theory and the work of Emmanuel Levinas, we introduce a performative concept of ethical oaths that is characterised by (1) the existential self-performative of the one I want to be, which is (2) demanded by the public context. Because ethical oaths are (3) structurally threatened by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paulo Fernando Carneiro Andrade (2010). O Cristianismo diante dos Desafios da Globalização Econômica e Cultural (Christianity before the challenges of economic globalization and cultural) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n15p110. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (15):110-121.score: 42.0
    O presente artigo objetiva refletir sobre os impactos da globalização econômica na cultura contemporânea. O processo acelerado de transformação da cultura e das relações sociais distingue-se de outros processos de mudança estrutural porque as mudanças no campo da economia desde a década de 1980 provocaram uma grave crise cultural. O que mais caracteriza os novos tempos é a expansão do mercado que se torna omniabrangente e omnipresente, transformando as relações humanas em relações de mercado. Globalização neoliberal e a expansão do (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Angus Burgin (2009). The Radical Conservatism of Frank H. Knight. Modern Intellectual History 6 (3):513-538.score: 42.0
    This article examines the most prominent interwar economist at the University of Chicago, Frank Knight, through the lens of a controversial 1932 lecture in which he exhorted his audience to vote Communist. The fact that he did so poses a historical problem: why did the premier American exponent of conservative economic principles appear to advocate a vote for radical change? This article argues that the speech is representative of Knight's deliberately paradoxical approach, in which he refused to praise markets (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Clive L. Spash (1999). The Development of Environmental Thinking in Economics. Environmental Values 8 (4):413 - 435.score: 42.0
    There has always been a sub-group of established economists trying to convey an environmental critique of the mainstream. This paper traces their thinking into the late 20th century via the development of associations and journals in the USA and Europe. There is clearly a divergence between the conformity to neo-classical economics favoured by resource and environmental economists and the acceptance of more radical critiques apparent in ecological economics. Thus, the progressive elements of ecological economics are increasingly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mathias Thaler (2012). Deep Contextualism and Radical Criticism: The Argument for a Division of Labour in Contemporary Political Theory. In José Maria Castro Caldas & Vítor Neves (eds.), Facts, Values and Objectivity in Economics. Routledge.score: 36.0
    This paper sheds light on the main issue of this book by affording a side look at a discipline other than economics, namely political theory. It is argued that the contemporary debate in political theory hinges on the question of 'realism'. Through a discussion of Raymond Geuss's work, the paper seeks to show that political theory remains caught between the conflicting requirements of deep contextual analysis and radically critical engagement with the world 'as it is'. Finally, the idea of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jonathan Israel (2014). Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850). Diametros 40:73-98.score: 36.0
    Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. James M. Buchanan & Viktor J. Vanberg (1991). The Market as a Creative Process. Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):167-.score: 30.0
    Our purpose is to identify a body of criticism of orthodox equilibirum theory in economics that seems to correspond closely with the developments note in the natural sciences, and, second, to elaborate on the implications of this (the radical subjectivist) criticism in some detail and, particularly, in this relation to its near neighbour, the entrepreneurial conception of Israel Kirzner.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. James Franklin (2011). Caritas in Veritate: Economic Activity as Personal Encounter and the Economy of Gratuitousness. Solidarity 1 (1).score: 30.0
    We first survey the Catholic social justice tradition, the foundation on which Caritas in Veritate builds. Then we discuss Benedict’s addition of love to the philosophical virtues (as applied to economics), and how radical a change that makes to an ethical perspective on economics. We emphasise the reality of the interpersonal aspects of present-day economic exchanges, using insights from two disciplines that have recognized that reality, human resources and marketing. Finally, we examine the prospects for an (...) of gratuitousness at a level higher than the individual, that is, for businesses devoted to social ends more than profit. (shrink)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thomas A. Boylan & Pascal F. O'Gorman (1991). The Critique of Equilibrium Theory in Economic Methodology: A Constructive Empiricist Perspective. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):131 – 142.score: 30.0
    Abstract Kaldor, one of the leading figures of the post?war ?Cambridge School?, has produced a large volume of methodological writings since the mid?1960s, which we will argue represents one of the major critiques of orthodox equilibrium economic theory produced this century. While Kaldor's position represents a fundamental and radical rejection of the methodological basis of equilibrium economics, he did not provide a systematically formulated alternative methodology for economics. Recent attempts at providing such a reconstruction has argued that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David L. Prychitko (1993). Formalism in Austrian‐School Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge? Critical Review 7 (4):567-592.score: 30.0
    Contemporary Austrian?school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free?market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Charles W. Anderson (1981). Book Review:Welfare and Planning: An Analysis of Capitalism Versus Socialism. Heinz Kohler; The Discretionary Economy: A Normative Theory of Political Economy. Marc R. Tool; The Conservative Economic World View. Benjamin Ward; The Liberal Economic World View. Benjamin Ward; The Radical Economic World View. Benjamin Ward. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (4):675-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. B. H. Vollmar (2013). Economic Theory: A Field for the Application of Non-Dualist Thought? A Clarification of Potential Epistemic Benefits. Constructivist Foundations 8 (2):216-226.score: 30.0
    Context: Due to its grounding in a simplistic core model, mainstream theoretical work in economics is heavily conditioned by a realist epistemic framework that may be viewed as the “paradogma” – sensu Mitterer – of economics. Problem: The contribution delineates theoretical developments on the basis of a realist epistemology and their problem-laden consequences for the economic sciences. The subsequent critical discussion seeks to clarify whether economic theory formation is a suitable field for the application of Mitterer’s non-dualist ideas. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alex Schulman (2009). Stockholm Syndrome: Radical Islam and the European Response. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (4):469-492.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that too restrictive an understanding has governed both academic and popular analysis of the social, cultural, and political conflicts between the Western European majorities and their Islamic minorities. These conflicts are typically viewed through the prisms of majority racism and/or minority economic disadvantage. While such social facts are undoubtedly important, I argue that the ideology of radical Islamism must be taken seriously in any analysis of the problem. Thus, I do two things in this essay. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ash Amin & Joanne Roberts (eds.) (2008). Community, Economic Creativity, and Organization. OUP Oxford.score: 30.0
    It has long been an interest of researchers in economics, sociology, organization studies, and economic geography to understand how firms innovate. Most recently, this interest has begun to examine the micro-processes of work and organization that sustain social creativity, emphasizing the learning and knowing through action when social actors and technologies come together in 'communities of practice'; everyday interactions of common purpose and mutual obligation. These communities are said to spark both incremental and radical innovation. -/- In the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Adrian Pabst (2013). The Genesis and Ethos of the Market, Luigino Bruni. Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 240 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):430-437.score: 30.0
    Both modern political economy and capitalism rest on the separation of economics from ethics, which in turn can be traced to a number of shifts within philosophy and theology – notably the move away from practices of reciprocity and the common good towards the sole pursuit of individual freedom and self-interest. In his latest book, Luigino Bruni provides a compelling critique of capitalist markets and an alternative vision that fuses Aristotelian-Thomist virtue ethics with the Renaissance and Neapolitan Enlightenment tradition (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Sniegocki (2009). Catholic Social Teaching and Economic Globalization: The Quest for Alternatives. Marquette University Press.score: 30.0
    Introduction -- Overview of the contemporary global context : life stories -- Data on poverty, hunger, and inequality in an age of globalization -- The goals and structure of this book -- Development theory and practice : an overview -- Origins of the concept of development -- Modernization theory -- Modernization theory and U.S. aid policy -- The impact of modernizationist development -- Structuralist economic theories -- Dependency theories -- Basic needs approach -- New international economic order -- Alternative development (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Pierluigi Barrotta (2008). Why Economists Should Be Unhappy with the Economics of Happiness. Economics and Philosophy 24 (2):145-165.score: 26.0
    The economics of happiness is an influential research programme, the aim of which is to change welfare economics radically. In this paper I set out to show that its foundations are unreliable. I shall maintain two basic theses: (a) the economics of happiness shows inconsistencies with the first person standpoint, contrary claims on the part of the economists of happiness notwithstanding, and (b) happiness is a dubious concept if it is understood as the goal of welfare policies. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Anthony Curtis Adler (2007). The Practical Absolute: Fichte's Hidden Poetics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (4):407-433.score: 24.0
    The following paper argues that J.G. Fichte, despite his apparent philosophical neglect of art and aesthetics, does develop a strong, original, and coherent account of art, which not only allows the theorization of modern, non-representative art forms, but indeed anticipates Nietzsche and Heidegger in conceiving of truth in terms of art rather than scientific rationality. While the basis of Fichte’s philosophy of art is presented in the essay “On Spirit and Letter in Philosophy,” it is not developed systematically either in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kevin deLaplante, Philosophy of Ecology: An Overview.score: 24.0
    The philosophy of ecology addresses foundational conceptual and methodological issues in ecological science. Specifying these issues is complicated by the fact that there is disagreement among ecologists over how to identify the proper domain of ecology. Many ecologists prefer a more restrictive definition that focuses on properties of nonhuman organisms in natural environments. Others defend a more expansive definition that includes the study of human-environment relations, a view that challenges the traditional conception of ecology as strictly a natural biological science. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Nick Chater (1999). Why Biological Neuroscience Cannot Replace Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):834-834.score: 24.0
    Gold & Stoljar argue persuasively that there is presently not a good case for the “radical neuron doctrine.” There are strong reasons to believe that this doctrine is false. An analogy between psychology and economics strongly throws the radical neuron doctrine into doubt.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Lorraine Daston & Fernando Vidal (eds.) (2004). The Moral Authority of Nature. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    For thousands of years, people have used nature to justify their political, moral, and social judgments. Such appeals to the moral authority of nature are still very much with us today, as heated debates over genetically modified organisms and human cloning testify. The Moral Authority of Nature offers a wide-ranging account of how people have used nature to think about what counts as good, beautiful, just, or valuable. The eighteen essays cover a diverse array of topics, including the connection of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Brian Weatherson, Keynes and Wittgenstein.score: 24.0
    Three recent books have argued that Keynes’s philosophy, like Wittgenstein’s, underwent a radical foundational shift. It is argued that Keynes, like Wittgenstein, moved from an atomic Cartesian individualism to a more conventionalist, intersubjective philosophy. It is sometimes argued this was caused by Wittgenstein’s concurrent conversion. Further, it is argued that recognising this shift is important for understanding Keynes’s later economics. In this paper I argue that the evidence adduced for these theses is insubstantial, and other available evidence contradicts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Vivienne Brown (1994). Adam Smith's Discourse: Canonicity, Commerce, and Conscience. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Adam Smith's name has become synonymous with free market economics. Recent scholarship has given us a richer, more nuanced figure, steeped in the intricacies of enlightenment social and political philosophy. Adam Smith's Discourse develops this literature and gives it a radical new dimension. The first book on Adam Smith to deal with recent debates in literary theory, this interdisciplinary work examines Smith's major texts and places them within the context of enlightenment thought. It considers Smith's major writings--the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Paul Bloom (2013). Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil. Crown.score: 24.0
    A leading cognitive scientist argues that a deep sense of good and evil is bred in the bone. From John Locke to Sigmund Freud, philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates. Many of us take for granted that babies are born selfish and that it is the role of society—and especially parents—to transform them from little sociopaths into civilized beings. In Just Babies, Paul Bloom argues that humans are in fact hardwired with a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gavin Rae (2010). Marcuse, Aesthetics, and the Logic of Modernity. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):383-398.score: 24.0
    Herbert Marcuse is a thinker associated with one of the most radical and totalising critiques of modernity ever produced. Marcuse maintains that contemporary capitalist society is a one-dimensional prison that is capable of perpetuating itself by incorporating any criticism into its logic. Despite this totalisation, Marcuse insists that the realm of aesthetics is capable of escaping the logic of modern capitalism and establishing an alternative society that is grounded in an alternative non-repressive logic. However, it is argued that not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Eleanor Courtemanche (2012). Marx, Heine, and German Cosmopolitanism: The 1844 Deutsch-Französische Jahrbücher. Telos 2012 (159):49-63.score: 24.0
    ExcerptIn the tradition of classical political economy, Marx is usually read as an oppositional figure, rejecting the optimistic dogma of free trade and replacing it with a catastrophic vision of capitalism's self-destruction. Yet Marx was also a cosmopolitan figure who, like the classical economists, rejected a narrow nationalism for the vision of an internationally just economic sphere. The Communist Manifesto, for example, is addressed to “Workers of All Nations” and not just German workers. Marx saw his intervention as a combination (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Simon Ferrari & Ian Bogost (2013). Reviewing Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games. Continent 3 (1):50-52.score: 24.0
    Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter. Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games . Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2009. 320pp. pbk. $19.95 ISBN-13: 978-0816666119. In Games of Empire , Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter expand an earlier study of “the video game industry as an aspect of an emerging postindustrial, post-Fordist capitalism” (xxix) to argue that videogames are “exemplary media of Empire” (xxix). Their notion of “Empire” is based on Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s Empire (2000), which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Michael Keaney (1997). The Poverty of Rhetoricism: Popper, Mises and the Riches of Historicism. History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):1-22.score: 24.0
    The attacks on historicism by radical individualists such as Popper and Mises have had lasting repercussions in the social sciences. Specifically, the term is used to connote deterministic, teleological theories of history, associated with Hegelian notions of destiny and positivist ideas of historical laws. This article argues that historicism is very different in character, in that it essentially amounts to the belief that social science and history are one and the same, whilst emphasizing the separate epis temology of natural (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Alan Cottey (2013). Moral Equivalents of Greed. AI and Society 28 (4):531-539.score: 24.0
    The author considers James’ (1910) essay The Moral Equivalent of War and applies some of its ideas to another pressing problem of our times, which for short is called greed, but can be described more precisely as the working out of the possessive market society under the conditions of neoliberalism and great technological power. James considered that pacifists had the best arguments, but failed to persuade mainstream society. The same can be said today of the critics of neoliberalism. There is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Mercedes Barischetti (2011). Una lectura educativa de La institución imaginaria de la sociedad. Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 13 (2):78-82.score: 24.0
    Pensadores griegos y orientales, filósofos antiguos, medioevales y modernos, han tocado el tema de lo corporal de manera fragmentaria que reducen lo corpóreo a mero instrumento. Para evitar este tipo de interpretaciones, queda el expediente de acudir a la síntesis holística; a la versión del "cuerpo total" que somos. La economía imperante es la del "cuerpo poseído". Se tasa, vende y desecha en el mercado la fuerza de trabajo. Se ejerce sobre él una violencia que nos rebasa en todos los (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Alicia Ferreira Gonçalves & Joannes Paulus Silva Forte (2013). A Cáritas brasileira e a Economia Popular Solidária: O Agente de Cáritas e a Caridade Libertadora (Brazilian Caritas and the Popular Solidarity Economy: The Agent of Caritas and the Charity Liberating) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n32p1506. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (32):1506-1524.score: 24.0
    O presente artigo analisa as ligações entre a Cáritas Brasileira e a Economia Popular Solidária a partir do trabalho do Agente de Cáritas. A problemática central do artigo remete às representações sociais que esses Agentes constroem em seus relatos sobre os princípios da Teologia da Libertação que norteiam os projetos em economia solidária da referida instituição religiosa. A metodologia de base qualitativa e etnográfica consistiu na realização da revisão bibliográfica, consulta a materiais institucionais, observação in loco e entrevistas semiestruturadas com (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Paul Heyne (1992). For the Common Good? Critical Review 6 (2-3):185-209.score: 24.0
    Herman E. Daly, an economist, and John B. Cobb, Jr., a theologian, have teamed up to write a book that calls for a radical restructuring of the way we organize production and exchange. They believe that the pressure of human population and production on the biosphere will soon compel thoroughgoing changes in the way we live. They also believe that we would want radical changes, with more emphasis on community and less on the pursuit of individual advantage, if (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mari Kooskora (2006). Perceptions of Business Purpose and Responsibility in the Context of Radical Political and Economic Development: The Case of Estonia. Business Ethics 15 (2):183–199.score: 24.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Andrew Brennan (1992). Moral Pluralism and the Environment. Environmental Values 1 (1):15 - 33.score: 24.0
    Cost-benefit analysis makes the assumption that everything from consumer goods to endangered species may in principle be given a value by which its worth can be compared with that of anything else, even though the actual measurement of such value may be difficult in practice. The assumption is shown to fail, even in simple cases, and the analysis to be incapable of taking into account the transformative value of new experiences. Several kinds of value are identified, by no means all (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Renata Lemos-Morais (2010). Money as Media: Gilson Schwartz on the Semiotics of Digital Currency. Continent 1 (1):22-25.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 22-25. The Author gratefully acknowledges the financial support of CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento do Ensino Superior), Brazil. From the multifarious subdivisions of semiotics, be they naturalistic or culturalistic, the realm of semiotics of value is a ?eld that is getting more and more attention these days. Our entire political and economic systems are based upon structures of symbolic representation that many times seem not only to embody monetary value but also to determine it. The connection between monetary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Arturo Rico Bovio (2011). The Reasons of the Body: an Ethics to Assume Violence. Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 13 (2):61-69.score: 24.0
    Pensadores griegos y orientales, filósofos antiguos, medioevales y modernos, han tocado el tema de lo corporal de manera fragmentaria que reducen lo corpóreo a mero instrumento. Para evitar este tipo de interpretaciones, queda el expediente de acudir a la síntesis holística; a la versión del "cuerpo total" que somos. La economía imperante es la del "cuerpo poseído". Se tasa, vende y desecha en el mercado la fuerza de trabajo. Se ejerce sobre él una violencia que nos rebasa en todos los (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. B. Brecher (forthcoming). Elizabeth Anderson, Value in Ethics and Economics. Radical Philosophy.score: 24.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. María Verónica Godoy (2011). Los relatos populares andinos: Expresión de conflictos. Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 13 (2):73-74.score: 24.0
    Pensadores griegos y orientales, filósofos antiguos, medioevales y modernos, han tocado el tema de lo corporal de manera fragmentaria que reducen lo corpóreo a mero instrumento. Para evitar este tipo de interpretaciones, queda el expediente de acudir a la síntesis holística; a la versión del "cuerpo total" que somos. La economía imperante es la del "cuerpo poseído". Se tasa, vende y desecha en el mercado la fuerza de trabajo. Se ejerce sobre él una violencia que nos rebasa en todos los (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Leticia Katzer (2011). Los relatos populares andinos: Expresión de conflictos. Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 13 (2):75-77.score: 24.0
    Pensadores griegos y orientales, filósofos antiguos, medioevales y modernos, han tocado el tema de lo corporal de manera fragmentaria que reducen lo corpóreo a mero instrumento. Para evitar este tipo de interpretaciones, queda el expediente de acudir a la síntesis holística; a la versión del "cuerpo total" que somos. La economía imperante es la del "cuerpo poseído". Se tasa, vende y desecha en el mercado la fuerza de trabajo. Se ejerce sobre él una violencia que nos rebasa en todos los (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Maurice Lagueux, Ronald Coase on Methodology By.score: 24.0
    Ronald Coase is usually considered anything but a methodologist. Thus, it is not surprising that, in the introduction to "How Should Economists Choose?", which is the only paper Coase wrote on a methodological topic, he readily confessed his relative ignorance of philosophy of science, candidly observing that "Words like epistemology do not come tripping from my tongue" (HSEC, 6). However, given the importance of this Nobel Prize winner's contribution to the renewal of theoretical thinking in economics, everyone should admit (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000