Search results for 'Radical economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Mulligan (2006). Transactional Economics: John Dewey's Ways of Knowing and the Radical Subjectivism of the Austrian School. Education and Culture 22 (2):61-82.score: 144.0
    The subjectivism of the Austrian school of economics is a special case of Dewey's transactional philosophy, also known as pragmatism or pragmatic epistemology. The Austrian economists Carl Friedrich Menger (1840-1921) and Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973) adopted an Aristotelian deductive approach to economic issues such as social behavior and exchange. Like Menger and Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) viewed scientific knowledge, even in the social sciences, as asserting and aiming for objective certainty. Hayek was particularly critical of attempts to apply (...)
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  2. Francis Dupuis-Déri & Arnold L. Farr (2013). And Economics, with a Concentration in Globalization, at the University of Pennsylvania, and She Recently Studied English at King's College in London. She is Interested in Human Rights and Genocide Studies. She is the Associate Editor of “Critical Refusals,” the 2013 Double Special Issue of the Radical Phi. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (2):679-683.score: 126.0
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  3. Eli Berman (2009). Radical, Religious, and Violent: The New Economics of Terrorism. The Mit Press.score: 120.0
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  4. Richard John Neuhaus (1984). Demo[C]Racy, Economics, and Radical Pluralism. In Adlai E. Stevenson & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), The Citizen and His Government. Distributed by the University of Texas Press.score: 120.0
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  5. Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
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  6. Martin K. Jones (2011). External Validity and Libraries of Phenomena: A Critique of Guala's Methodology of Experimental Economics. Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):247-271.score: 60.0
    Francesco Guala has developed some novel and radical ideas on the problem of external validity, a topic that has not received much attention in the experimental economics literature. In this paper I argue that his views on external validity are not justified and the conclusions which he draws from these views, if widely adopted, could substantially undermine the experimental economics enterprise. In rejecting the justification of these views, the paper reaffirms the importance of experiments in economics.
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  7. Nicholas Bardsley (2005). Experimental Economics and the Artificiality of Alteration. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):239-251.score: 56.0
    A neglected critique of social science laboratories alleges that they implement phenomena different to those supposedly under investigation. The critique purports to be conceptual and so invulnerable to a technical solution. I argue that it undermines some economics designs seeking to implement features of real societies, and counsels more modesty in experimental write?ups. It also constitutes a plausible argument that laboratory economics experiments are necessarily less demonstrative than natural scientific ones. More radical sceptical conclusions are unwarranted.
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  8. Christian List & Franz Dietrich, Mentalism Versus Behaviourism in Economics: A Philosophy-of-Science Perspective.score: 54.0
    Behaviourism is the view that preferences, beliefs, and other mental states in social-scientific theories are nothing but constructs re-describing people's behavioural dispositions. Mentalism is the view that they capture real phenomena, no less existent than the unobservable entities and properties in the natural sciences, such as electrons and electromagnetic fields. While behaviourism has long gone out of fashion in psychology and linguistics, it remains influential in economics, especially in `revealed preference' theory. We aim to (i) clear up some common (...)
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  9. David Ellerman (1992). Property and Contract in Economics: The Case for Economic Democracy. Blackwell.score: 54.0
    From a pre-publication review by the late Austrian economist, Don Lavoie, of George Mason University: -/- "The book's radical re-interpretation of property and contract is, I think, among the most powerful critiques of mainstream economics ever developed. It undermines the neoclassical way of thinking about property by articulating a theory of inalienable rights, and constructs out of this perspective a "labor theory of property" which is as different from Marx's labor theory of value as it is from neoclassicism. (...)
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  10. Vincent Blok (2013). The Power of Speech Acts: Reflections on a Performative Concept of Ethical Oaths in Economics and Business. Review of Social Economy 71 (2):187-208.score: 54.0
    Ethical oaths for bankers, economists and managers are increasingly seen as successful instruments to ensure more responsible behaviour. In this article, we reflect on the nature of ethical oaths. Based on John Austin's speech act theory and the work of Emmanuel Levinas, we introduce a performative concept of ethical oaths that is characterised by (1) the existential self-performative of the one I want to be, which is (2) demanded by the public context. Because ethical oaths are (3) structurally threatened by (...)
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  11. Angus Burgin (2009). The Radical Conservatism of Frank H. Knight. Modern Intellectual History 6 (3):513-538.score: 54.0
    This article examines the most prominent interwar economist at the University of Chicago, Frank Knight, through the lens of a controversial 1932 lecture in which he exhorted his audience to vote Communist. The fact that he did so poses a historical problem: why did the premier American exponent of conservative economic principles appear to advocate a vote for radical change? This article argues that the speech is representative of Knight's deliberately paradoxical approach, in which he refused to praise markets (...)
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  12. Charles W. Anderson (1981). Book Review:Welfare and Planning: An Analysis of Capitalism Versus Socialism. Heinz Kohler; The Discretionary Economy: A Normative Theory of Political Economy. Marc R. Tool; The Conservative Economic World View. Benjamin Ward; The Liberal Economic World View. Benjamin Ward; The Radical Economic World View. Benjamin Ward. [REVIEW] Ethics 91 (4):675-.score: 50.0
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  13. Mathias Thaler (2012). Deep Contextualism and Radical Criticism: The Argument for a Division of Labour in Contemporary Political Theory. In José Maria Castro Caldas & Vítor Neves (eds.), Facts, Values and Objectivity in Economics. Routledge.score: 48.0
    This paper sheds light on the main issue of this book by affording a side look at a discipline other than economics, namely political theory. It is argued that the contemporary debate in political theory hinges on the question of 'realism'. Through a discussion of Raymond Geuss's work, the paper seeks to show that political theory remains caught between the conflicting requirements of deep contextual analysis and radically critical engagement with the world 'as it is'. Finally, the idea of (...)
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  14. Bernard Hodgson (2005). Thinking and Acting Outside the Neo-Classical Economic Box: Reply to McMurtry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):289 - 303.score: 46.0
    This paper responds to Professor John McMurtry, primarily to his critique (Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 44, 2003) of my recent book, Economics as Moral Science (Springer-Verlag, 2001). Although agreeing with my attribution of a moral a priorism to orthodox or neo-classical economics, McMurtry takes issue with my conversion thesis, that ana priori, ethically committed theory can be transformed into a testable empirical science of actual behaviour through the application of institutional constraints to individual motivations. McMurtry views such (...)
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  15. Paulo Fernando Carneiro Andrade (2010). O Cristianismo diante dos Desafios da Globalização Econômica e Cultural (Christianity before the challenges of economic globalization and cultural) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n15p110. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (15):110-121.score: 46.0
    O presente artigo objetiva refletir sobre os impactos da globalização econômica na cultura contemporânea. O processo acelerado de transformação da cultura e das relações sociais distingue-se de outros processos de mudança estrutural porque as mudanças no campo da economia desde a década de 1980 provocaram uma grave crise cultural. O que mais caracteriza os novos tempos é a expansão do mercado que se torna omniabrangente e omnipresente, transformando as relações humanas em relações de mercado. Globalização neoliberal e a expansão do (...)
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  16. Jonathan Israel (2014). Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850). Diametros 40:73-98.score: 44.0
    Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical (...)
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  17. David L. Prychitko (1993). Formalism in Austrian‐School Welfare Economics: Another Pretense of Knowledge? Critical Review 7 (4):567-592.score: 42.0
    Contemporary Austrian?school economists reject neoclassical welfare theory for being founded on the benchmark of a perfectly competitive general equilibrium, and instead favor a formal theory deemed consistent with the notions of radical subjectivism and disequilibrium analysis. Roy Cordato advances a bold free?market benchmark by which to formally assess social welfare, economic efficiency, and externalities issues. Like all formalist, a priori theory, however, Cordato's reformulation cannot meet its own standards, being theoretically and empirically flawed, and perhaps ideologically suspect.
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  18. Mari Kooskora (2006). Perceptions of Business Purpose and Responsibility in the Context of Radical Political and Economic Development: The Case of Estonia. Business Ethics 15 (2):183–199.score: 40.0
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  19. Alex Schulman (2009). Stockholm Syndrome: Radical Islam and the European Response. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (4):469-492.score: 38.0
    This paper argues that too restrictive an understanding has governed both academic and popular analysis of the social, cultural, and political conflicts between the Western European majorities and their Islamic minorities. These conflicts are typically viewed through the prisms of majority racism and/or minority economic disadvantage. While such social facts are undoubtedly important, I argue that the ideology of radical Islamism must be taken seriously in any analysis of the problem. Thus, I do two things in this essay. I (...)
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  20. Jan-Willem Romeijn & Olivier Roy (2014). Radical Uncertainty: Beyond Probabilistic Models of Belief. Erkenntnis 79 (6):1221-1223.score: 36.0
    Over the past decades or so the probabilistic model of rational belief has enjoyed increasing interest from researchers in epistemology and the philosophy of science. Of course, such probabilistic models were used for much longer in economics, in game theory, and in other disciplines concerned with decision making. Moreover, Carnap and co-workers used probability theory to explicate philosophical notions of confirmation and induction, thereby targeting epistemic rather than decision-theoretic aspects of rationality. However, following Carnap’s early applications, philosophy has more (...)
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  21. B. Brecher (forthcoming). Elizabeth Anderson, Value in Ethics and Economics. Radical Philosophy.score: 36.0
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  22. Warren Montag (2005). Necro-Economics: Adam Smith and Death in the Life of the Universal. Radical Philosophy 134:7.score: 36.0
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  23. Pierluigi Barrotta (2008). Why Economists Should Be Unhappy with the Economics of Happiness. Economics and Philosophy 24 (2):145-165.score: 34.0
    The economics of happiness is an influential research programme, the aim of which is to change welfare economics radically. In this paper I set out to show that its foundations are unreliable. I shall maintain two basic theses: (a) the economics of happiness shows inconsistencies with the first person standpoint, contrary claims on the part of the economists of happiness notwithstanding, and (b) happiness is a dubious concept if it is understood as the goal of welfare policies. (...)
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  24. James Franklin (2011). Caritas in Veritate: Economic Activity as Personal Encounter and the Economy of Gratuitousness. Solidarity 1 (1).score: 34.0
    We first survey the Catholic social justice tradition, the foundation on which Caritas in Veritate builds. Then we discuss Benedict’s addition of love to the philosophical virtues (as applied to economics), and how radical a change that makes to an ethical perspective on economics. We emphasise the reality of the interpersonal aspects of present-day economic exchanges, using insights from two disciplines that have recognized that reality, human resources and marketing. Finally, we examine the prospects for an (...) of gratuitousness at a level higher than the individual, that is, for businesses devoted to social ends more than profit. (shrink)
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  25. Thomas A. Boylan & Pascal F. O'Gorman (1991). The Critique of Equilibrium Theory in Economic Methodology: A Constructive Empiricist Perspective. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):131 – 142.score: 34.0
    Abstract Kaldor, one of the leading figures of the post?war ?Cambridge School?, has produced a large volume of methodological writings since the mid?1960s, which we will argue represents one of the major critiques of orthodox equilibrium economic theory produced this century. While Kaldor's position represents a fundamental and radical rejection of the methodological basis of equilibrium economics, he did not provide a systematically formulated alternative methodology for economics. Recent attempts at providing such a reconstruction has argued that (...)
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  26. B. H. Vollmar (2013). Economic Theory: A Field for the Application of Non-Dualist Thought? A Clarification of Potential Epistemic Benefits. Constructivist Foundations 8 (2):216-226.score: 34.0
    Context: Due to its grounding in a simplistic core model, mainstream theoretical work in economics is heavily conditioned by a realist epistemic framework that may be viewed as the “paradogma” – sensu Mitterer – of economics. Problem: The contribution delineates theoretical developments on the basis of a realist epistemology and their problem-laden consequences for the economic sciences. The subsequent critical discussion seeks to clarify whether economic theory formation is a suitable field for the application of Mitterer’s non-dualist ideas. (...)
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  27. Ash Amin & Joanne Roberts (eds.) (2008). Community, Economic Creativity, and Organization. OUP Oxford.score: 34.0
    It has long been an interest of researchers in economics, sociology, organization studies, and economic geography to understand how firms innovate. Most recently, this interest has begun to examine the micro-processes of work and organization that sustain social creativity, emphasizing the learning and knowing through action when social actors and technologies come together in 'communities of practice'; everyday interactions of common purpose and mutual obligation. These communities are said to spark both incremental and radical innovation. -/- In the (...)
     
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  28. John Sniegocki (2009). Catholic Social Teaching and Economic Globalization: The Quest for Alternatives. Marquette University Press.score: 34.0
    Introduction -- Overview of the contemporary global context : life stories -- Data on poverty, hunger, and inequality in an age of globalization -- The goals and structure of this book -- Development theory and practice : an overview -- Origins of the concept of development -- Modernization theory -- Modernization theory and U.S. aid policy -- The impact of modernizationist development -- Structuralist economic theories -- Dependency theories -- Basic needs approach -- New international economic order -- Alternative development (...)
     
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  29. James M. Buchanan & Viktor J. Vanberg (1991). The Market as a Creative Process. Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):167-.score: 30.0
    Our purpose is to identify a body of criticism of orthodox equilibirum theory in economics that seems to correspond closely with the developments note in the natural sciences, and, second, to elaborate on the implications of this (the radical subjectivist) criticism in some detail and, particularly, in this relation to its near neighbour, the entrepreneurial conception of Israel Kirzner.
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  30. George Khushf (1998). A Radical Rupture in the Paradigm of Modern Medicine: Conflicts of Interest, Fiduciary Obligations, and the Scientific Ideal. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):98 – 122.score: 30.0
    Conflicts of interest serve as a cipher for a radical rupture in the Flexnerian paradigm of medicine, and they can only be addressed if we recognize that health care is now practiced by institutions, not just individual physicians. By showing how "appropriate utilization of services" or "that which is medically indicated" is a function of socioeconomic factors related to institutional responsibilities, I point toward an administrative and organizational ethic as a needed component for addressing conflicts of interest. The argument (...)
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  31. Carolyn Merchant (2005). Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World. Routledge.score: 30.0
    In the first edition of Radical Ecology --the now classic examination major philosophical, ethical, scientific, and economic roots of environmental problems--Carolyn Merchant responded to the profound awareness of environmental crisis which prevailed in the closing decade of the twentieth century. In this provocative and readable study, Merchant examined the ways that radical ecologists can transform science and society in order to sustain life on this planet. Now in this second edition, Merchant continues to emphasize how laws, regulations and (...)
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  32. Herbert Simon (1998). Economics as a Historical Science. Theoria 13 (2):241-260.score: 30.0
    As science deals with invariants and history with dated events, the phrase “historical science” might be thought to be an oxymoron. However, the prevalence in the natural sciences and economics of differential equations filled with time derivatives should persuade us of the legitimacy of joining history with science. The combination can, in fact, take several forms. This paper examines some of the ways inwhich history and economics can be fashioned into economic history, and the reasons why they need (...)
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  33. Zoë Bennett & David B. Gowler (eds.) (2012). Radical Christian Voices and Practice: Essays in Honour of Christopher Rowland. OUP Oxford.score: 30.0
    On the margins of the biblical canon and on the boundaries of what are traditionally called 'mainstream' Christian communities there have been throughout history writings and movements which have been at odds with the received wisdom and the consensus of establishment opinion. If one listens carefully, these dissident voices are reflected in the Bible itself-whether in the radical calls for social change from the Hebrew Bible prophets, with Jesus the apocalyptic prophet who also demanded social and economic justice for (...)
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  34. Todd Davies (2005). Radical Contingency in Sharing Behavior and its Consequences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):821-821.score: 30.0
    The data of Henrich et al., when combined with other research, suggest that sharing behavior probably varies systematically across cultures, situations, and individuals. Economic policies founded on recognition of this “radical contingency” would, I argue, nurture economic pluralism rather than attempting to bring the world under one system.
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  35. Anthony J. Evans & Jeffrey Friedman (2011). “Search” Vs. “Browse”: A Theory of Error Grounded in Radical (Not Rational) Ignorance. Critical Review 23 (1-2):73-104.score: 30.0
    Economists tend to view ignorance as ?rational,? neglecting the possibility that ignorance is unintentional. This oversight is reflected in economists? model of ?information search,? which can be fruitfully contrasted with ?information browsing.? Information searches are designed to discover unknown knowns, whose value is calculable ex ante, such that this value justifies the cost of the search. In this model of human information acquisition, there is no primal or ?radical? ignorance that might prevent people from knowing which information to look (...)
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  36. I. Liebenberg & P. de Kock (2010). Review Article: Transforming the State Away From the State? Radical Social Action and 'Minority Attractions' Under Scrutiny. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (2).score: 30.0
    This review article situates the work Black Flame within a capita selecta of earlier publications on anarchism-syndicalism and radical thought. Schmidt and Van der Walt's contribution (2009) is a recent addition to political thought, theory and socio-economic practice within the broad stream of anarcho-syndicalism. Its treatment of anarchism and anarchist syndicalist groups in the workplace within an international context since the middle 1800s and the attempt to situate the debate in contemporary society are some notable features. The authors engage (...)
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  37. John Grumley (1999). A Utopian Dialectic of Needs? Heller's Theory of Radical Needs. Thesis Eleven 59 (1):53-72.score: 30.0
    The concept of `radical needs' has been a constant element in Heller's social philosophy over the last 25 years despite the fact that her own perspective moved progressively away from Marxian philosophical anthropology towards the position that she now characterizes as reflective post-modernism. This article charts this theoretical journey with a close examination of her articulation of the concept of radical needs in various phases of her work. Beginning with an attempt to rescue Marxism from the clutches of (...)
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  38. Gabriel Vargas Lozano (2001). Liberal Democracy and Radical Democracy. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 11:97-103.score: 30.0
    While the word “democracy” has proliferated in social and political discourse in recent decades, I suggest that the liberal democracy of the past, connected as it is (especially in the West) to the market economy, is insufficient for the challenges facing the contemporary Latin American context. I assess and criticize democratic ideas in order to suggest that the way forward is radical democracy based on socio-economic and political justice. These, however, have to be articulated at a variety of levels, (...)
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  39. Clive Dimmock (2011). Diversifying Schools and Leveraging School Improvement: A Comparative Analysis of the English Radical, and Singapore Conservative, Specialist Schools' Policies. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (4):439 - 458.score: 30.0
    Within the context of fierce global economic competition, school diversification and specialist schools have been seen by governments as cornerstones of education policy to engineer school improvement in both England and Singapore for more than a decade. In both systems, the policy has manifested in different school types, school names and sometimes buildings-in England, specialist status schools, academies and most recently free schools; and in Singapore, specialist schools and niche schools. Diversification is promoted by each school emphasising distinctiveness in its (...)
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  40. Adrian Pabst (2013). The Genesis and Ethos of the Market, Luigino Bruni. Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 240 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):430-437.score: 30.0
    Both modern political economy and capitalism rest on the separation of economics from ethics, which in turn can be traced to a number of shifts within philosophy and theology – notably the move away from practices of reciprocity and the common good towards the sole pursuit of individual freedom and self-interest. In his latest book, Luigino Bruni provides a compelling critique of capitalist markets and an alternative vision that fuses Aristotelian-Thomist virtue ethics with the Renaissance and Neapolitan Enlightenment tradition (...)
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  41. M. N. Roy (2004). M.N. Roy, Radical Humanist: Selected Writings. Prometheus Books.score: 30.0
    The failure of philosophy -- A new political philosophy -- Radical democracy -- Politics of freedom -- The future of democracy -- Decentralization of power -- A Humanist approach to elections -- A new approach to political and economic problems -- Human nature and humanist practice -- Humanist politics -- Integral humanism -- The way out -- New humanism -- The principles of radical democracy.
     
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  42. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.score: 27.0
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly (...)
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  43. Christine Clavien & Rebekka A. Klein (2010). Eager for Fairness or for Revenge? Psychological Altruism in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):267-290.score: 27.0
    To understand the human capacity for psychological altruism, one requires a proper understanding of how people actually think and feel. This paper addresses the possible relevance of recent findings in experimental economics and neuroeconomics to the philosophical controversy over altruism and egoism. After briefly sketching and contextualizing the controversy, we survey and discuss the results of various studies on behaviourally altruistic helping and punishing behaviour, which provide stimulating clues for the debate over psychological altruism. On closer analysis, these studies (...)
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  44. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie (...)
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  45. Barry Smith (1994). The Philosophy of Austrian Economics. Review of Austrian Economics 7:127–132.score: 27.0
    Review of David Gordon, The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics (Auburn 1993).
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  46. Philippe Mongin (2006). Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics. Economica 73 (290):257-286.score: 24.0
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than the other (...)
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  47. Ted Honderich (2006). Radical Externalism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (7-8):3-13.score: 24.0
    If you want a philosophically diligent exposition of a theory, something that has got through review by conventional peers, go elsewhere (Honderich, 2004). If you want an understanding made more immediate by brevity and informality, read on. The theory is a Radical Externalism about the nature of consciousness. If it is not a complete departure from the cranialism of most of the philosophy and science of consciousness, it is a fundamental departure.
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  48. Daniel M. Hausman, Philosophy of Economics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  49. Timothy McCarthy (2002). Radical Interpretation and Indeterminacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    McCarthy develops a theory of radical interpretation--the project of characterizing from scratch the language and attitudes of an agent or population--and applies it to the problems of indeterminacy of interpretation first described by Quine. The major theme in McCarthy's study is that a relatively modest set of interpretive principles, properly applied, can serve to resolve the major indeterminacies of interpretation.
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  50. Julie A. Nelson (2004). Clocks, Creation and Clarity: Insights on Ethics and Economics From a Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):381 - 398.score: 24.0
    This essay discusses the origins, biases, and effects on contemporary discussions of economics and ethics of the unexamined use of the metaphor an economy is a machine. Both neoliberal economics and many critiques of capitalist systems take this metaphor as their starting point. The belief that economies run according to universal laws of motion, however, is shown to be based on a variety of rationalist thinking that – while widely held – is inadequate for explaining lived human experience. (...)
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