Search results for 'Rafael G. Locke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rafael G. Locke (2011). The Future of a Discipline: Considering the Ontological/Methodological Future of the Anthropology of Consciousness, Part III. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):106-135.score: 870.0
    The anthropology of consciousness is a field of enormous and demanding scope. In this article, there is no attempt to address all of the current trends in thinking and research; rather, the aim was to draw a line through the field that extends from the 19th century and European philosophies to some contemporary expressions of those philosophies in social science research. In particular, taking the original project of Edmund Husserl, an approach to the phenomenological investigation of the nature of consciousness (...)
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  2. John Locke (1990). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Drafts for the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and Other Philosophical Writings: In Three Volumes: Volume 1: Drafts A and B. Clarendon Press.score: 600.0
    This is the first of three volumes which will contain all of Locke's extant philosophical writings relating to An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, not included in other Clarendon editions like the Correspondence. It contains the earliest known drafts of the Essay, Drafts A and B, both written in 1671, and provides for the first time an accurate version of Locke's text. Virtually all his changes are recorded in footnotes on each page. -/- Peter Nidditch, whose highly acclaimed edition (...)
     
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  3. Hillary S. Webb (2010). Book Review: Altered States of Consciousness and Psi: An Historical Survey and Research Prospectus (Parapsychological Monograph Series No. 18). Edward F. Kelly and Rafael G. Locke. [REVIEW] Anthropology of Consciousness 21 (2):224-226.score: 450.0
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  4. Don Locke (1968). The Identity Theory of Mind. Ed. G. F. Presly. (Australia: University of Queensland Press; London: C. Hurst & Co., 1967. Pp. Xix + 164. Price $Aus. 4.25; £2 5s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 43 (166):385-.score: 360.0
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  5. B. H. G. (1979). Hobbes and Locke. Review of Metaphysics 32 (3):554-556.score: 360.0
  6. Don Locke (1965). Body and Mind, Readings in Philosophy. Edited by G. N. A. Vesey. (London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd, 1964. Pp. 472. Price 52s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 40 (152):180-.score: 360.0
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  7. Ralph G. Locke & Edward F. Kelly (1985). A Preliminary Model for the Cross‐Cultural Analysis of Altered States of Consciousness. Ethos 13 (1):3-55.score: 240.0
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  8. Nicholas Jolley (2001). Locke's Enlightenment. G.A.J. Rogers. Mind 110 (439):821-824.score: 120.0
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  9. Don Locke (1974). Action, Movement, and Neurophysiology. Inquiry 17 (1-4):23 – 42.score: 120.0
    Action is to be distinguished from (mere) bodily movement not by reference to an agent's intentions, or his conscious control of his movements (Sect. I), but by reference to the agent as cause of those movements, though this needs to be understood in a way which destroys the alleged distinction between agent-causation and event-causation (Sect. II). It also raises the question of the relation between an agent and his neurophysiology (Sect. III), and eventually the question of the compatibility of purposive (...)
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  10. D. Daiches Raphael (1950). The Life of Reason: Hobbes, Locke, Bolingbroke. By D. G. James. (London: Longmans, Green & Co. 1949. Pp. Xiii + 272. Price 18s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 25 (94):281-.score: 120.0
  11. Peter Schouls (2000). Locke's Enlightenment: Aspects of the Origin, Nature, and Impact of His Philosophy G. A. J. Rogers Hildesheim, Zurich, and New York: Georg Olms Verlag, 1998, Xiv + 194 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 39 (02):414-.score: 120.0
  12. Robert A. Wilson (2002). Locke's Primary Qualities. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):201-228.score: 66.0
    Introduction in chapter viii of book ii of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, John Locke provides various putative lists of primary qualities. Insofar as they have considered the variation across Locke's lists at all, commentators have usually been content simply either to consider a self-consciously abbreviated list (e.g., "Size, Shape, etc.") or a composite list as the list of Lockean primary qualities, truncating such a composite list only by omitting supposedly co-referential terms. Doing the latter with minimal judgment (...)
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  13. David Owen (2007). Locke on Judgment. In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Locke usually uses the term “judgment” in a rather narrow but not unusual sense, as referring to the faculty that produces probable opinion or assent.2 His account is explicitly developed in analogy with knowledge, and like knowledge, it is developed in terms of the relation various ideas bear to one another. Whereas knowledge is the perception of the agreement or disagreement of any of our ideas, judgment is the presumption of their agreement or disagreement. Intuitive knowledge is the immediate (...)
     
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  14. Tom G. Palmer (1998). G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality. Critical Review 12 (3):225-251.score: 60.0
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support his egalitarian conclusions, (...)
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  15. Susan G. Sterrett, Locke, Memory & Personal Identity: Me and My Memory, Together Forever.score: 60.0
    Locke's views on memory are too often oversimplified. This previously unpublished essay by S. G. Sterrett takes a sympathetic look at Locke's writings on the topic. The most interesting (and plausible) accounts of memory hold that, rather than simply retrieving stored entities, remembering is an act intrinsically and intimately involving a specific person --- if person is taken in Locke's sense -- and so these accounts support Locke's appeal to memory in his discussion of personal identity.
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  16. I. C. Tipton (ed.) (1977). Locke on Human Understanding: Selected Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 58.0
    Wall, G. Locke's attack on innate knowledge.--Harris, J. Leibniz and Locke on innate ideas.--Greenlee, D. Locke's idea of idea.--Aspelin, G. Idea and perception in Locke's essay.--Greenlee, D. Idea and object in the essay.--Mathews, H. E. Locke, Malebranche and the representative theory.--Alexander, P. Boyle and Locke on primary and secondary qualities.--Ayers, M. R. The ideas of power and substance in Locke's philosophy.--Allison, H. E. Locke's theory of personal identity.--Kretzmann, N. The main thesis of (...)
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  17. Dan Kaufman (2007). Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499-534.score: 54.0
    In this paper, I examine the crucial relationship between Locke’s theory of individuation and his theory of kinds. Locke holds that two material objects -- e.g., a mass of matter and an oak tree -- can be in the same place at the same time, provided that they are ‘of different kinds’. According to Locke, kinds are nominal essences, that is, general abstract ideas based on objective similarities between particularindividuals. I argue that Locke’s view on coinciding (...)
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  18. Rafael De Clercq (2005). A Criterion of Diachronic Identity Based on Locke's Principle. Metaphysica 6 (1):23-38.score: 54.0
    The aim of this paper is to derive a perfectly general criterion of identity through time from Locke’s Principle, which says that two things of the same kind cannot occupy the same space at the same time. In this way, the paper pursues a suggestion made by Peter F. Strawson almost thirty years ago in an article called ‘Entity and Identity’. The reason why the potential of this suggestion has so far remained unrealized is twofold: firstly, the suggestion was (...)
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  19. Michael Jacovides (2012). Locke and the Visual Array. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):69-91.score: 54.0
    A.D. Smith opens his excellent paper, “Space and Sight,” by remarking, One of the most notable features of both philosophy and psychology throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is the almost universal denial that we are immediately aware through sight of objects arrayed in three-dimensional space. This was not merely a denial of Direct Realism, but a denial that truly visual objects are even phenomenally presented in depth (481). Times have changed. As Smith writes, “It is hard to think of (...)
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  20. James Hill (2009). Primary Qualities, Secondary Qualities and Locke's Impulse Principle. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):85 – 98.score: 54.0
    In this paper I shall focus attention on a principle which lies at the heart of Locke's distinction between primary and secondary qualities. It is to be found explicitly or implicitly stated at many places in the Essay , but its clearest expression is at E.II.viii.11, where Locke writes that ' Impulse [is] the only way which we can conceive Bodies operate in'. Let us call it 'the impulse principle'. The first task is to describe what exactly the (...)
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  21. Rafael De Clercq (2013). Locke's Principle is an Applicable Criterion of Identity. Noûs 47 (4):697-705.score: 54.0
    According to Locke’s Principle, material objects are identical if and only if they are of the same kind and once occupy the same place at the same time. There is disagreement about whether this principle is true, but what is seldom disputed is that, even if true, the principle fails to constitute an applicable criterion of identity. In this paper, I take issue with two arguments that have been offered in support of this claim by arguing (i) that we (...)
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  22. Kevin Scharp (2008). Locke's Theory of Reflection. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):25 – 63.score: 54.0
    Those concerned with Locke’s Essay have largely ignored his account of reflection. I present and defend an interpretation of Locke’s theory of reflection on which reflection is not a variety of introspection; rather, for Locke, we acquire ideas of our mental operations indirectly. Furthermore, reflection is involuntary and distinct from consciousness. The interpretation I present also explains reflection’s role in the acquisition of non-sensory ideas (e.g., ideas of pleasure, existence, succession, etc.). I situate this reading within the (...)
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  23. Michael J. White, Locke on Newton's Principia: Mathematics or Natural Philosophy?score: 54.0
    In his Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke explicitly refers to Newton’s Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica in laudatory but restrained terms: “Mr. Newton, in his never enough to be admired Book, has demonstrated several Propositions, which are so many new Truths, before unknown to the World, and are farther Advances in Mathematical Knowledge” (Essay, 4.7.3). The mathematica of the Principia are thus acknowledged. But what of philosophia naturalis? Locke maintains that natural philosophy, conceived as natural science (as opposed (...)
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  24. Adam Mossoff (2012). Saving Locke From Marx: The Labor Theory of Value in Intellectual Property Theory. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):283-317.score: 54.0
    The labor theory of value is fundamental to John LockeJustifying Intellectual Property,s physical labor contributes only proportionally to this socially-created market value. Robert Nozick, G. A. Cohen, and other philosophers similarly dismiss the labor theory of value as illogical or incoherent. But these philosophers redefine Lockes labor theory of economic value. The principle of interpretative charity demands reconsideration of Lockes property theory within the context of his natural law ethical theory, as presented in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and in (...)
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  25. María G. Navarro (2011). Review of 'The Great Ocean of Knowledge. The Influence of Travel Literature on the Work of John Locke' by Ann Talbot. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 69 (3&4):162-164.score: 54.0
    The resercher Ann Talbot presents in this book one of the more complex and in-depth studies ever written about the influence of travel literature on the work of the British philospher John Locke (1632-1704). At the end of the 18th century the study of travel literature was an alternative to academic studies. The philosopher John Locke recommended with enthousiasm these books as a way to comprehend human understanding. Several members of the Royal Society like John Harris (1966-1719) affirmed (...)
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  26. Clement W. K. Mundle (1971). Perception: Facts And Theories. London,: Oxford University Press,.score: 48.0
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  27. Fraser Cowley (1968). A Critique Of British Empiricism. Macmillan.score: 48.0
  28. Athanasios P. Fotinis (1974). Perception and the External World: A Historical and Critical Account. Philosophia 4:433-448.score: 48.0
  29. Nicholas Pastore (1971). Selective History Of Theories Of Visual Perception, 1650-1950. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
  30. James G. Buickerood (1985). The Natural History of the Understanding: Locke and the Rise of Facultative Logic in the Eighteenth Century. History and Philosophy of Logic 6 (1):157-190.score: 42.0
    Whatever its merits and difficulties, the concept of logic embedded in much of the ?new philosophy? of the early modern period was then understood to supplant contemporary views of formal logic. The notion of compiling a natural history of the understanding constituted the basis of this new concept of logic. The following paper attempts to trace this view of logic through some of the major and numerous minor texts of the period, centering on the development and influence of John (...)'s understanding of the analysis of the cognitive faculties as the discipline of logic. (shrink)
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  31. G. A. J. Rogers (2004). Locke and the Objects of Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):245–254.score: 42.0
    It is common to assume that if Locke is to be regarded as a consistent epistemologist he must be read as holding that either ideas are the objects of perception or that (physical) objects are. He must either be a direct realist or a representationalist. But perhaps, paradoxical as it at first sounds, there is no reason to suppose that he could not hold both to be true. We see physical objects and when we do so we have ideas. (...)
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  32. G. A. J. Rogers (ed.) (1994). Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Three hundred years after his major publications, John Locke remains one of the most potent philosophical influences in the world today. His epistemology has become embedded in our everyday presumptions about the world, and his political theory lies at the heart of the liberal democratic state. This collection by a distinguished international group of scholars looks both at core areas of Locke's philosophy and political theory and at areas not usually discussed--the links between Locke's philosophy and his (...)
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  33. Thomas G. West (2012). The Ground of Locke's Law of Nature. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):1-50.score: 42.0
    This essay will show that Lockes writings. Locke draws his reader into an amazingly complex line of reasoning, scattered up and down in several of his books, leading finally to the real basis of his teaching on the law of nature. Locke engages the reader in a dialogue, in which initially plausible arguments are put forward, then implicitly questioned, leading to new arguments, which again are questioned, and so on. Locke says that are necessary to discover the (...)
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  34. G. A. J. Rogers (1988). Revolutionary Politics and Locke's "Two Treatises of Government". Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (4):668-670.score: 42.0
    'It would ... be a pity if the sketch of religious controversy in the 1670s contained in Richard Ashcraft's bold and exhilarating attempt to reconstruct the argument and intellectual framework of Locke's political thinking and activity should be thought to represent the entire debate accurately.' (Spurr 1988, 567 n. 17) 'has also taken the view that Locke equated the dissolution of government with the state of nature [pp. 576–6]. Important opponents of this view include Dunn [1969, p. 181] (...)
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  35. Steven Tester (2013). G.C. Lichtenberg on Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 95 (3):336-359.score: 42.0
  36. Raymond G. McInnis & Amy L. Lindemuth (1996). Discursive Communities/Interpretive Communities: The New Logic, John Locke, and Dictionary-Making, 1660-1760. Social Epistemology 10 (1):107 – 122.score: 42.0
    (1996). Discursive communities/interpretive communities: The new logic, John Locke, and dictionary‐making, 1660–1760. Social Epistemology: Vol. 10, Discourse Synthesis, pp. 107-122.
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  37. Vincent G. Potter (ed.) (1993). Readings in Epistemology: From Aquinas, Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant. Fordham University Press.score: 42.0
    A companion volume to On Understanding Understanding, this second edition incorporates corrections to the previous text and includes new readings. The works collected in this volume are mainly from the British Empiricists. The breadth of the selection is not so diverse that the pieces cannot be readily understood by a newcomer to Epistemology, they have a logical progression of development (from Locke to Berkeley to Hume), and all of the philosophers whose work is represented have had great influence on (...)
     
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  38. Robert G. Meyers (2001). Was Locke an Empiricist? Locke Studies 1:63-85.score: 42.0
     
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  39. John G. Bennett (1979). A Note on Locke's Theory of Tacit Consent. Philosophical Review 88 (2):224-234.score: 36.0
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  40. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). Berkeley's Pantheistic Discourse. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (3):179-194.score: 36.0
    Berkeley's immaterialism has more in common with views developed by Henry More, the mathematician Joseph Raphson, John Toland, and Jonathan Edwards than those of thinkers with whom he is commonly associated (e.g., Malebranche and Locke). The key for recognizing their similarities lies in appreciating how they understand St. Paul's remark that in God "we live and move and have our being" as an invitation to think to God as the space of discourse in which minds and ideas are identified. (...)
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  41. Lorenne M. G. Clark (1977). Women and John Locke; Or, Who Owns the Apples in the Garden of Eden? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):699 - 724.score: 36.0
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  42. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1969). A Paradox in Locke's Theory of Natural Rights. Dialogue 8 (02):256-271.score: 36.0
  43. G. A. J. Rogers (1986). Leibniz and Locke. A Study of the "New Essays on Human Understanding". Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (4):556-558.score: 36.0
  44. J. G. A. Pocock (1983). English Historical Thought in the Age of Harrington and Locke. Topoi 2 (2):149-162.score: 36.0
  45. Bruce Langtry (1975). Locke and the Relativisation of Identity. Philosophical Studies 27 (6):401 - 409.score: 36.0
    Arc there cases in which an object x is thc same F as an object y but x is not the same G as y, cvcn though x is a G? A11 aihrmativc answer will have drastic repercussions 011 0ne’s account of identity and on one’s quantification theory. For suppose that the expression ‘x is the same F as y’ can be understood as ‘x is an F and y is an F and x is identical with y’, and that (...)
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  46. Am Feallsanach (1998). Locke and Libertarian Property Rights: Reply to Weinberg. Critical Review 12 (3):319-323.score: 36.0
    Abstract In his ?Freedom, Self?Ownership, and Libertarian Philosophical Diaspora, ?Justin Weinberg attempts to show, by using arguments from G.A. Cohen, that philosophical defenses of libertarian natural rights are doomed to failure, because they are either circular (by basing libertarianism on the value of ?freedom") or invalid (by basing libertarianism on a self?ownership premise that actually leads to some form of egalitarianism). In fact, however, a natural?rights libertarianism based on the self?ownership premise is not inconsistent if it holds that the (...)
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  47. Dean A. Kowalski (ed.) (2012). The Big Bang Theory and Philosophy: Rock, Paper, Scissors, Aristotle, Locke. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 36.0
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgments Introduction: "Unraveling the Mysteries" Part One. "It All Began on a Warm Summer's Evening in Greece": Aristotelian Insights 1. Aristotle on Sheldon Cooper: Ancient Greek Meets Modern Geek Greg Littmann 2. "You're a Sucky, Sucky Friend": Seeking Aristotelian Friendship in The Big Bang Dean A. Kowalski 3. The Big Bang Theory on the Use and Abuse of Modern Technology Kenneth Wayne Sayles III Part Two. "Is It Wrong to Say I Love Our Killer Robot?": Ethics (...)
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  48. Henry G. Leeuwevann (1981). Locke's Theory of Sensitive Knowledge. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2).score: 36.0
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  49. G. A. J. Rogers (1988). Ideas, Qualities and Corpuscles: Locke and Boyle on the External World By Peter Alexander Cambridge University Press, 1985, Ix + 336 Pp., £32.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 63 (246):548-.score: 36.0
  50. G. A. J. Rogers (1972). Locke's Philosophy of Science and Knowledge. A Consideration of Some Aspects of 'an Essay Concerning Human Understanding'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):183-189.score: 36.0
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